T Nation

If You Want to Eat Pure Food, You're CRAZY!


#1

Fixation with healthy eating can be sign of serious psychological disorder.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2009/aug/16/orthorexia-mental-health-eating-disorder

That's it, boys and girls. We're all orthorexics now. This is bullshit of the very highest order.


Orthorexia Nervosa
Orthorexia Nervosa
#2

It isn’t bullshit. The bodybuilding community is FULL of people with personality disorders, including eating disorders. Calling the problem “bullshit” only displays how out-of-touch with reality you really are.

By the way, 2.5 hours have elapsed since your last meal. Shouldn’t you be heating up another boiled chicken breast and 3 oz plain sweetpotato?


#3

[quote]JMoUCF87 wrote:
It isn’t bullshit. The bodybuilding community is FULL of people with personality disorders, including eating disorders. Calling the problem “bullshit” only displays how out-of-touch with reality you really are.

By the way, 2.5 hours have elapsed since your last meal. Shouldn’t you be heating up another boiled chicken breast and 3 oz plain sweetpotato?[/quote]

And your post indicates to me that you either didn’t bother to read the article, or didn’t understand it.

I don’t particularly care for sweet potatoes (had a bad one in Japan, and have never liked them since), and I would never boil a chicken breast.

Illustrated above is more representative of what I eat:

Broiled grass-fed porterhouse steak, rubbed in herbs, garlic, pepper and olive oil
Organic raspberries, wild blueberries and black grapes
Organic baby herbs and baby spinach
Sauteed organic brown mushrooms, spinach and zucchini

Clearly indicative of an eating disorder, I know. I’d seek medical help, but I’m too out of touch with reality.


#4

Hmmm. Picture didn’t go. Try again.


#5

[quote]Varqanir wrote:
I’d seek medical help, but I’m too out of touch with reality. [/quote]

Combined with your avatar - Im now scared :wink:

All jokes aside… with so many fatasses raised on mcdonalds and pop tarts… why the shit is the average joe trying try drag down those who are striving for dietary perfection?


#6

Here’s another.

Two chicken breasts, sauteed in olive oil with garlic, mushrooms, spinach and herbs, on a bed of organic baby spinach leaves, organic strawberries, green and red pepper, and avocado.

Somebody save me from myself. I clearly have a serious problem.


#7

[quote]benmoore wrote:
Varqanir wrote:
I’d seek medical help, but I’m too out of touch with reality.

Combined with your avatar - Im now scared :wink:

All jokes aside… with so many fatasses raised on mcdonalds and pop tarts… why the shit is the average joe trying try drag down those who are striving for dietary perfection?[/quote]

“striving for dietary perfection”?

they say admitting there’s a problem is the first step, ya know.


#8

I’d say that, if your dietary requirements are making you socially isolated, it’s possible you’re doing something wrong.


#9

Where do you draw the line though? I second that if your eating is causing you to lose friends/spend a lot less time with them, then you’ve gone to far.


#10

[quote]The other Rob wrote:
Where do you draw the line though? I second that if your eating is causing you to lose friends/spend a lot less time with them, then you’ve gone to far.[/quote]

yeah whatever bro, you’re just jealous of my hawt abz.

what’s that? you wanna go out to the club tonight? Sorry bro, I can’t my next scheduled meal is in an hour and a half: 4 organic free range omega-3 enriched eggs, 1 oz of cheese from grass-fed cows, and a slice of pesticide free, non-GMO, organic, sprouted-grain bread with 2 tbsp of omega-3 enhanced, flax-almond butter.


#11

What sort of person would stop being your friend because you eat healthy foods? What sort of activities are they doing that you, in avoiding these activities, must avoid spending time with them?

Sounds to me that these sort of friendships weren’t terribly strong to begin with.


#12

[quote]Otep wrote:
I’d say that, if your dietary requirements are making you socially isolated, it’s possible you’re doing something wrong.[/quote]

One could say that about one’s exercise requirements as well.

The trick is to make friends with people who share your interests.


#13

[quote]Varqanir wrote:
What sort of person would stop being your friend because you eat healthy foods? What sort of activities are they doing that you, in avoiding these activities, must avoid spending time with them?

Sounds to me that these sort of friendships weren’t terribly strong to begin with.[/quote]

In America, eating out and drinking is a huge social event. I know there have been times when I haven’t gone out because I know I’m not going to drink.

Granted, it doesn’t happen every time my friends go out, there have been times. Usually I go and have only a drink or two, and I make sure to eat plenty before I go to bed.


#14

I can see this being a problem if I were dieting down, but otherwise I think eating a little ‘dirtier’ would benifite most peoples mass building endervours anyways. I did the constant macronutrient measurements all last year and I don’t think it really made a huge difference on my physique. I did get a big taste of what it’s like to diet down though, and how much it actually took for me to bulk (5000ckals at 200lbs :o

But as long as you aren’t being too antiscocial it’s all good, there’s a balance.


#15

[quote]DOHCrazy wrote:
In America, eating out and drinking is a huge social event. I know there have been times when I haven’t gone out because I know I’m not going to drink. [/quote]

If you don’t want to drink alcohol, then don’t drink it. Doesn’t mean you can’t still go out. You can always say you the designated driver.

And no matter what my dietary requirements happen to be, there’s always something on the menu that I can eat, with a little imagination and creative ordering. It’s usually not as good as something I can make myself, but there’s always something.

And if not, then it’s likely not a restaurant that I or any of my friends would go to anyway, so no worries.


#16

I agree with the OP mostly.

From somebody who’s known some people with real eating disorders the article is BS.
First off it implies that you can’t have a healthy dieting being nutritionally “perfectionist.” That’s bullshit. It wants to insult those who strive to be healthy.

The article has some merit in that it can be a problem if you rule out TOO many foods (for instance ALL carbs, or ALL fats or whatnot). So long as you are getting all the nutrients and
such it should be fine. They make it out to be a big deal.

If you’re losing friends chances are there may be a problem. And just finding new friends that have the same issues might not be the answer. Anorexics can be friends with other anorexics. Doesn’t mean that they’re both not just fucked up.

So long as you’re eating healthy, and getting what your body needs, and not obsessing TOO much then it’s ALL good baby.


#17

[quote]Malone wrote:

So long as you’re eating healthy, and getting what your body needs, and not obsessing TOO much then it’s ALL good baby.[/quote]

Yup.

My biggest problem with the article is that it represents the creation of one more bogus “psychological disorder” for some quack to diagnose, and perhaps prescribe drugs and therapy to “cure.”

If I happen to prefer nutritious, natural food to the genetically modified, pesticide-laden, highly processed, corn-syrup saturated crap that most people in America stuff in their fat faces, I don’t need the medical community telling me that I’m the one with the eating disorder.


#18

[quote]Malone wrote:
I agree with the OP mostly.

From somebody who’s known some people with real eating disorders the article is BS.
First off it implies that you can’t have a healthy dieting being nutritionally “perfectionist.” That’s bullshit. It wants to insult those who strive to be healthy.
[/quote]

This is tantamount to saying that an article about anorexia “wants to insult people who strive to be skinny”.

newsflash: we don’t live in an either/or world. there exists shades of gray. just because you try to choose healthier options doesn’t mean you are an orthorexic, so untwist your panties for me will you?

[quote]Malone wrote:
The article has some merit in that it can be a problem if you rule out TOO many foods (for instance ALL carbs, or ALL fats or whatnot). So long as you are getting all the nutrients and
such it should be fine. They make it out to be a big deal.

If you’re losing friends chances are there may be a problem. And just finding new friends that have the same issues might not be the answer. Anorexics can be friends with other anorexics. Doesn’t mean that they’re both not just fucked up.

So long as you’re eating healthy, and getting what your body needs, and not obsessing TOO much then it’s ALL good baby.[/quote]

Right…and the people who are “not obsessing TOO much” is NOT who the article is discussing. Orthorexia comes into play when you DO obsess about eating “healthy” (as if there is any objective definition of “healthy” anyway, but that’s another story)


#19

I think we need more people like this. America’s getting alarmingly fat.


#20

I think that rather than worry too much about those poor orthorexics who are alienating their unhealthy fatass friends through their “obsession” with non-poisonous food, the medical community ought to spend a little time dealing with the real problem: apathorexia nervosa.

This condition affects equal numbers of men and women, but sufferers tend to be aged between 18 and 45, lower-middle-class and not-very-well-educated. Apathorexia is described as “not giving a shit one way or another what kind of garbage one stuffs in one’s piehole.”

Surprisingly, there appear to be a large number of apathorexics in the fitness community, who are under the impression that as long as they are getting the requisite quantity of macronutrients, the nutritional quality of the food doesn’t really matter.

Apathorexics may often be seen eating Pop-Tarts and Big Macs, swilling Diet Coke, and extolling the virtues of the “bulk belly.”