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If You DL Often, Have to Squat?

Hi, how are you?

I’m thinking of adding Pavel’s GTG program into my routine: which is essentially deadlifting 2 sets of 5 reps daily at 80% of your 5RM, five days per week.

I know that people say that you must sqaut in order to maintain healthy muscle balance…

Is this really true?

I hate squatting and wouldn’t mind never doing them again!

Thanks!

[quote]madmaxs wrote:
Hi, how are you?

I’m thinking of adding Pavel’s GTG program into my routine: which is essentially deadlifting 2 sets of 5 reps daily at 80% of your 5RM, five days per week.

I know that people say that you must sqaut in order to maintain healthy muscle balance.

Is this really true?

I hate squatting and wouldn’t mind never doing them again!

Thanks![/quote]

well if your gonna be deadlifting 5 times a week it might be ok to not squat for a short period of time. but eventually you will have to suck it up and get back into the squat rack!

If you’re worried about overtraining the PC, throw in some front squats.

[quote]madmaxs wrote:
I’m thinking of adding Pavel’s GTG program into my routine: which is essentially deadlifting 2 sets of 5 reps daily at 80% of your 5RM, five days per week.
Thanks![/quote]

did you mean 80% of 1 rep max?

I would never stop squating. squating is a more complete full leg exercise while the deadlift uses the lower back a lot more. I’m not saying that the lower back does not get hit while squatting because it does in order to stabilize the region. i work three different stances when squatting: sumo a little wider then shoulder width, and a little narrower then shoulder. with the deadlift i work regular and sumo stance varying powerlifting and straight grip.

Why don’t you do the same routine as you stated above for barbell hack squats. try to work as wide a grip as is possible to get a deep position and use wraps for safety. laters pk

I think you’ll probably get stronger in the deadlifti f you also squat. My squat strength was/is the weakness on my pull strength right now, and as my box squat comes up, my pull is blowing up.

I guess it depends on your personal strengths and weaknesses.

It depends on your goals. If your goal is just to develop solid overall strength, but not to compete, then just deadlifts is fine. If you want, you can mix up the deadlifts to give yourself more leg work by doing romanian deadlifts, single leg deadlifts, trap/shrug bar deadlifts and behind the back deadlifts. If you stick to the volume/intensity suggested by Pavel, you won’t overtrain.

The old time strongmen didn’t have squat racks. Any weightlifting they did, the bar or 'bell started on the floor.

it’s supposed to be one set of five reps at 90% of 1rm, and a second set of five reps at 80% of 1rm.

this is an ok routine if you’re starting out or you want to change things up a bit, but i would change to something else after a couple of weeks.

[quote]rawda wrote:
it’s supposed to be one set of five reps at 90% of 1rm, and a second set of five reps at 80% of 1rm.

[/quote]

False. Pavel suggests starting with a weight “you can comfortably do 10 reps with”. This doesn’t sound like 90% 1RM to me. Elsewhere he says it should be 70-80% of your 5RM. Unless your 5RM is bigger than your 1RM that doesn’t compute.

The second set weight should be 90% of the first.

PS this program will last you a lot longer than two weeks. The suggested progression is increase weight for first set by 5 pounds every training session. second set remains 90% of the first.

When you reach the point where you can no longer do 5 reps for your first set, you can either drop back and begin again with 5 pounds more than the first progression, or continue working up with lower reps for the first set until you reach a max triple or double, then drop back and begin again.

You won’t build mass on this regime, but you will get strong.

Thanks for all the answers.

Why won’t you build mass on this regime?

I assumed that if it brings up your DL numbers a lot, by default, you would gain mass. For example, if your DL goes up 100 pounds (mine right now is at 240), won’t you gain muscle mass?

Thanks!

[quote]madmaxs wrote:
Thanks for all the answers.

Why won’t you build mass on this regime?

I assumed that if it brings up your DL numbers a lot, by default, you would gain mass. For example, if your DL goes up 100 pounds (mine right now is at 240), won’t you gain muscle mass?
[/quote]
or rather… . wont you gain muscle mass IF YOU EAT FOR IT?

Im still confused at how someone can say a program is better for mass than another when the key factor to muscle growth is food. …

[quote]madmaxs wrote:
Thanks for all the answers.

Why won’t you build mass on this regime?

I assumed that if it brings up your DL numbers a lot, by default, you would gain mass. For example, if your DL goes up 100 pounds (mine right now is at 240), won’t you gain muscle mass?
[/quote]

Nope. Doing low reps and low number of sets, you get better at lifting by increased neural efficiency. Untrained individuals can only use around 25-30% of their muscle fibers at once, even during a maximum effort contraction. This is because of systems in the body designed to prevent overtaxing of ligaments and tendons. With frequent practice, your nervous system starts to “release the brakes” and you can lift more.

(If you are completely new to lifting, you probably will gain a small amount of muscle to start with. But the gains will not continue. If you want to continue growing your muscles, you need more volume.)

Madmaxs,

So you hate squatting and prefer to deadlift often.

You know what brother? You’ve got my blessing. And don’t let anybody else tell you differently.

If you don’t like to squat, it’s quite simple. Don’t squat.

[quote]sharetrader wrote:

Nope. Doing low reps and low number of sets, you get better at lifting by increased neural efficiency. Untrained individuals can only use around 25-30% of their muscle fibers at once, even during a maximum effort contraction. This is because of systems in the body designed to prevent overtaxing of ligaments and tendons. With frequent practice, your nervous system starts to “release the brakes” and you can lift more.

(If you are completely new to lifting, you probably will gain a small amount of muscle to start with. But the gains will not continue. If you want to continue growing your muscles, you need more volume.)[/quote]

come on… . your saying that with a calorie surplus you wont build muscle mass with a pure strength program?

eyup all
a newbie here, ive been training for around six months now but ive always considered myself quite strong? i`ve been a grafter all my life so it seems natural.

just deadlifted for the first time today and worked my way upto 140kgs for 6 reps, a little worried about my form but felt fine, i dont use straps as i train grip often.

i too dislike squats, but i do plenty of hindu squats and i like these.

i would appreciate any deadlift advice, thanks all

[quote]Gl;itch.e wrote:
sharetrader wrote:

Nope. Doing low reps and low number of sets, you get better at lifting by increased neural efficiency. Untrained individuals can only use around 25-30% of their muscle fibers at once, even during a maximum effort contraction. This is because of systems in the body designed to prevent overtaxing of ligaments and tendons. With frequent practice, your nervous system starts to “release the brakes” and you can lift more.

(If you are completely new to lifting, you probably will gain a small amount of muscle to start with. But the gains will not continue. If you want to continue growing your muscles, you need more volume.)

come on… . your saying that with a calorie surplus you wont build muscle mass with a pure strength program? [/quote]

NO dude, he is saying that the volume is so low, so not to promote mass increase, but to promote nuro-musclar effeciancy. I think you have to train in differnt rep zones to actually put on the mass. In this workout you are not do any assistance exercises.

Will42

[quote]Will42 wrote:
NO dude, he is saying that the volume is so low, so not to promote mass increase, but to promote nuro-musclar effeciancy. I think you have to train in differnt rep zones to actually put on the mass. In this workout you are not do any assistance exercises.

Will42 [/quote]

the volume isnt low he’s doing it 5 times a week! plus volume isnt all there is to hypertrophy… . HIT for instance could be considered ultra low volume… . it still produces muscle gain. …

ultimately all we are talking about here is whether a program is “optimal” or not… . calorie surplus allways leads to mass gain… . the manipulation of the diet will help with muscle over fat… . and throw on top of that training and so long as your lifting heavy and consistantly youll grow. …

Ill just add usually trhe lift we dont like we dont like casue we suck at them there damn hard. But by doing them we get the most bang for the buck.

Squats HURT they are hard damn work but the pay off is huge. I love to hate them. Hell same with DL’s Love em look forward to them but pulling heavy is anything but easy. For me though its a lot more comfortable then loading a shit pack of plate on a bar puting it on my back and sqautting.

Are you trying to dodge them cause there hard and you suck at them?? Looking for an excuse?? If so I say lioke we do in the gym “Shut up and squat”

Youll be happy with the gains. DL to, they are both needed exercises and shouldnt be left out.

Phill

Hi,

I don’t want to squat b/c:

  1. I hate them!

  2. I work out at home, and have no spotter.

  3. I have flat feet, and my knees don’t seem to like squats much.

Thanks

[quote]madmaxs wrote:
Hi,

I don’t want to squat b/c:

  1. I hate them!

  2. I work out at home, and have no spotter.

  3. I have flat feet, and my knees don’t seem to like squats much.

Thanks[/quote]

  1. I hated to love to squat and still do its damn hard but empowering to slap a little more on grunt, spit blood and force that SOB UP. You’d learn to love them if you did them and hate em at the same time.

2)Never had a spotter in my life while squatting until the past three months. have been squatting 4 plate and up for a while sasn spotter. Just be carefull Push it but be smart do higher rep you’ll nail it and become comfortable and when all else fails learn to dump the bar. Or front sqaut more often

  1. Shit flat feet. Hell I have a leg that was cut off and reattached it faces out at a 45 degree angle and is an inch longer, ( not tooting my own horn just giving an example) It (leg) still lags can hurt like an sob at times after In time its catching up. Im now sqautting 5 plates an more every week. Dont let a disability limit you You can do anything you set your mind to.

That just My opinion take it or leave it. Once again I Just feel your selling yourself short by never doing them. They build character and TON of full body strength and musclature.

Best of luck