T Nation

Ideas for Chin Ups at Home?


#1

Does anyone has any ideas on how to contruct a home chin up station? For instance at home instead of using a bench with a BB rack, I use two saw horses to rest my BB on and rack the weights from there. I also squat the weight off of these saw horses. I'm wanting to figure out a way to chin ups and hanging pikes at home as well.

Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks


#2

they sell wall mounted ones.


#3

There are door mounted ones, that either bolt into the frame or are free hanging.
If your interested in training your grip as well, I would recommend the purchase of a hangboard, and then just bolt that above your doorway. I did it in my dorm room, and its great.


#4

Can you take any pictures of this set up and send it to me? Having a hard time envisioning this. Thanks


#5

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=4564433

says it will hold 400 lbs (eventhough it's listed as a pushup/situp bar). Don't see you can do chin ups too, unless you're one big mofo


#6

Pictures of some hangboards:

http://store.everestgear.com/432345.html

http://www.earthtreksclimbing.com/etch/hangboard.html

I don't know much about hangboards, but these look pretty cool.


#7

If you have a strong enough door, you can put a towel on the top of the door and then put your hands on it and perform Chin ups.

Hope this helps.


#8

Find a tree!


#9

Hangboards are cool but don't get the wrong idea about them. You DO NOT do pull-up from them, you hang. THey are great for building contact and digit strenght for climbing, but you also have to remember that your hanging your entire body weight from some very small joints.

La'
Redsol1


#10

my brother does them in his closet. He just grabs on to the top shelf and starts doing pullups. I tried it once but I weigh 275 pounds, so I decided that it wasn't a good idea.


#11

Thanks, but just by looking at these, I have no clue what you're supposed to do with them.

Thanks anyway.


#12

Yeah, I'm weighing about 220 now so I'm not thinking I want to pull my closet shelving down. I was look at the tracks that the garage door goes up and wondering if I hung on those if they'd support my weight? Who knows... maybe. It may be cheaper for me to just go to the gym than have to make repairs to my house if I break stuff.


#13

I have one of these and it works well. I weigh 240, and I once did a negative with a 50# DB - no problem. The only drawback is that the hand spacing for regular pull ups is narrow. But I mainly use the neutral grips (palms facing each other) and that works very well. Also, if you're tall, this may hang a bit too low for you.


#14

A hang board is not just for hanging. It trains both contact and dynamic strength. Most even have jugs for repping out on pull ups. Besides, when chinning on one of these, you have much better body tension. Ive included a pic of how I have mine set up, as well as one of the free hanging doorway chin bars.

www.gymcor.com/doorgym.html

And my set up in my dorm...


#15

could you just put some lag screws into the ceiling in a beam, and then hang a piece of pipe from them maybe. or maybe have rings. Then you could take them down too.


#16

if you have a basement that is the best place to hang a bar. If not then yes you can use eye bolts and please use heavy duty chain to hang your bar from. Just a little thought and you can make anything possible


#17

i recommend a doorway bar. i used it during high school when i weighed 200lbs, and it was great. you cant go that wide though, but thats prolly good for your shoulders anyways.


#18


try this one more time.


#19

I made a pull up bar out of black iron pipe from Lowes. It's not the greatest, but it works. Some modifications I would make:

First I would use bigger wrenches to assemble it. I only had two small junky ones to use, but if I had been at the farm I would have access to longer, better wrenches and that would have helped.

Then I would have used 1.5 or 2 inch pipe to come about a foot or so off the floor, then reduced it to 1 or 1.25 to go the rest of the way. Mine is only about 6 feet high, but I would probably make it 7, by adding the aforementioned thicker nipples at the bottom. I think I spent about 70 bucks including the wrenches and some junk parts I didn't use.

You could do a little better and get a better bar if you have access to a welder. It doesn't take a rocket scientist's intellect or a neurosurgeon's hand to stick weld something together, so that might be something you want to try.

In fact, then you could make an entire rack. You could even build a rack out of thick timber if you wanted to be really old school and avoid welding.

Hope that helps.


#20

I have a homemade joist-mounted bar in my basesment. I just screwed six 40-pound hooks into the joist and placed a steel bar in the hooks. It works great. I bought a long bar so I can vary the grip width. It all cost me about $9 at Home Depot.