I Am Trying To Figure Out My BF %

Absolutely, I think the only argument may be that the muscle mass at the beginning of a deployment would be a advantageous and then the body will consume the muscle as the warfighter experiences prolonged deficit. Idk I definitely know that guys that weighed 180 no taller than 6” were the most efficient soldiers. The only advantage I had was the ability to fireman carry casualties and was immediately made to carry the Barrett lol

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What about RFM?

For what goal?

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I use this one that adds neck circumference to the calculation.

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BMI is really just a simple-to-calculate predictor of all-cause mortality, particularly cardiovascular disease (heart attack, stroke)

In general, big people’s hearts need to work harder, so they better be of healthy body composition and CV fitness to support the large frame.

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Yah for sure, it’s just BMI basically becomes useless if you are an athlete, bodybuilder, or power lifter. That’s why I, personally, believe BF is an important indicator of “healthy body composition”. So anything over 18%, or arguably lower, would be considered unhealthy.

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I don’t feel this to be true. 400lbs and jacked is still 400lbs.

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wouldn’t that give someone a very high BMI? Even at 7” that would be a BMI of 40 lol

Exactly. Which would show that BMI still has some relevance.

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I’m an idiot lol

Edit: I’m thinking BF measurement.

However, that’s what I was saying originally, it is much more a measurement of a specific body’s longevity. As in if I dropped my current mass 306 to 220, which is my healthy BMI, I would need to lose 85lbs of fat. That would be approximately 0-3% which can’t be maintainable (I assume) What kind of return would I be able to achieve? At 240 I had a BMI of 33ish and 19%BF (tape test). I couldn’t lift nearly half of what I can now but had killer cardio performance. Was the lack of strength from poor workout programming or maybe a different goal (self sufficiency over raw strength)?

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Thats because the fitness community misrepresent BMI. As you noted BMI is used as a predictor of mortality. On its own, BMI is not very helpful for anything else

Mass moves mass. More bodyweight will generally correlate to bigger gym lifts.

Also didnt you mention you’re a relatively new lifter? I assume a lower training age when you were lighter (ie, less overall training) would contribute. 240lbs is still plenty big to be moving significant weight in the gym, given the appropriate time, training and consistency

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I really never took lifting serious in high school, I was on the rugby team but conditioning is far more important to high school league than strength. In the army, I did good PT sessions but it was all functional, I mean I had good lifts but nothing like now. The last 2 years has been me learning how to actually workout with a dedicated objective, which was originally just physical therapy.

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Good stuff man, I hope you’re enjoying lifting so far. Stay consistent and you’ll have everything you need to achieve your goals :slight_smile:

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I know I am late to the party here and did not check dates that closely, but if I read correctly you started TRT 3 week ago. Could be that weight you gained was TRT induced water retention and not actually from caloric surplus.