T Nation

Hypertrophy with a Pack of Cigarettes

I don’t know how much lactic acid plays into the stimulus for hypertrophy. If you decrease your body’s efficiency at processing o2 you’d generate more lactic acid right? So what happens if you go smoke a pack of cigs and then workout hard?

See Dennis Wolf.

[quote]darkhorse1-1 wrote:
So what happens if you go smoke a pack of cigs and then workout hard?[/quote]

Magic!

Darkhorse, it is hard to tell if you are a troll or just one of the tin foil hat folk on this forum.

[quote]DSSG wrote:
Darkhorse, it is hard to tell if you are a troll or just one of the tin foil hat folk on this forum.[/quote]

Agreed. Some very odd questions come from the OP.

that’s not schizophrenic rambling. It’s sound logic. It was a serious question made with no attempt to insight smart ass remarks. if you were at a plateau in your training then you need something to make shit harder. smoke a pack of cigarettes. shit just got harder. have you heard of blood occlusion training? what principal makes that shit work? starving muscles of o2 and nutrients.

if you become less efficient at processing o2 your muscles will store more glycogen also right? that’s probably where the primary increase in muscle size would come from if you did this. I don’t know how well this would work for advanced lifters since they probably have a lot of glycogen built up.

I also don’t know if there is a limit to how much glycogen a muscle will store. all questions I thought might be answered by wonderful people like you.

You do not become less efficient at processing O2 with cigarette smoking. You become less efficient at allowing sufficient diffusion of O2 from the alveoli to the pulmonary capillaries as well as decreasing alveoli ventilation. Research Fick?s law of diffusion across a tissue membrane or pick up any exercise physiology book.

If you wanted to make “shit” harder restrict your breathing with a mask decreasing minute ventilation and tidal volume NOT through smoking.

Train in your garage after your running engine emtied the thank with closed doors and windows.
Please report your results, i am curious !

[quote]BHappy wrote:
Train in your garage after your running engine emtied the thank with closed doors and windows.
Please report your results, i am curious ![/quote]

LOL

(Necessary disclaimer: this is idle curiosity ONLY.)

Sticking with the CO2 levels thing… have there been any studies regarding hyperbaric training and hypertrophy?

Because there are a lot of other ways to screw with CO2 and O2 balance in the bloodstream that are much less stupid than smoking a pack of cigarettes before training. Like using a rebreather from a scuba kit, or breathing through a paper bag.

For interesting, but non-training related stuff on blood oxygenation, do some research on Konstantin Buteyko and Vladimir Frolov.

[quote]LoRez wrote:
(Necessary disclaimer: this is idle curiosity ONLY.)

Sticking with the CO2 levels thing… have there been any studies regarding hyperbaric training and hypertrophy?[/quote]

Abstract

“The effects of hyperbaric exposure with high oxygen concentration on the physical activity of developing male rats were investigated. Five-week-old male rats were exposed to an atmospheric pressure of 1.25 with an oxygen concentration of 36.0% for 12 h (7.00-19.00 h) and exercised voluntarily for 12 h (19.00-7.00 h) daily for 8 weeks. The voluntary running activities were compared with those in age-matched rats without hyperbaric exposure. In addition, the properties of the soleus and plantaris muscle fibers and their spinal motoneurons were examined. The voluntary running activities of rats with or without hyperbaric exposure increased during development. However, the mean voluntary running activities were higher in rats with hyperbaric exposure (7,104 m/day) than in those without hyperbaric exposure (4,932 m/day). The oxidative capacities of the soleus and plantaris muscle fibers and their spinal motoneurons increased following hyperbaric exposure. It is suggested that adaptations of neuromuscular units to hyperbaric exposure with high oxygen concentration enhance the metabolism, and thus, the function of neuromuscular units is promoted.

Matsumoto, A., Okiura, T., Morimatsu, F., Ohira, Y., Ishihara, A., (2007). Effects of hyperbaric exposure with high oxygen concentration on the physical activity of developing rats. Developmental Neuroscience.2007; Vol. 29 (6), pp. 452-9.

Here they had a oxygen concentration of 36% however in the real world the concentration of oxygen is 20.93%. Only the driving pressure (mmHg) changes in altitude change.

Silly LoRez. You don’t need to qualify your posts as idle curiosity. That’s what all your questions are!

Also: Thank you fuzzy for nipping OP’s question in the bud.

[quote]darkhorse1-1 wrote:
I don’t know how much lactic acid plays into the stimulus for hypertrophy. If you decrease your body’s efficiency at processing o2 you’d generate more lactic acid right? So what happens if you go smoke a pack of cigs and then workout hard?[/quote]

Nicotine also constricts the users blood vessels for up to 8 hours after use so less of blood getting to your muscles. Therefore, less blood to supply the area by quite a bit more then the extra lactic acid would account for if I would hazard a guess.

These “what if” posts are starting to get very weird. (Who thinks of this shit?)