T Nation

Hypertrophy and Its Factors

Everybody will emphasize the importance of caloric intake and the fact that it must be above maintenance in order to ensure hypertrophy. And to maximize hypertrophy, above maintenance caloric intake is obviously a necessity.

However, caloric intake is not the only factor leading to hypertrophy. The other factors are:
-Quality of Training/Training Frequency
-Hormonal Levels
-Quality of Nutrition
-Bone Structure
-Muscle Structure
-Strength
-Individual Genetics
-Recovery

Now because Nutrition is a factor that we can directly manipulate, it gets the most attention (along with Training and Recovery) in regards to hypertrophy and rightly so.

However my question is, to what extent can hypertrophy occur at maintenance (or even slightly below) levels of caloric intake if the levels of Recovery and Training are intact?

For those whose sensibilities are offended by this question because you are thinking from a bodybuilder’s point of view (pack on as much muscle in as short a period of time as possible), let me remind you that I’m speaking from a standpoint of someone who would want to induce a state of hypertrophy, without adding fat and without time being a factor.

Since increased protein synthesis is required for hypertrophy, it would seem that body recomposition (LBM% vs BF%) would be the best-case scenario in terms of results achieved at maintenance caloric intake.

[quote]Quark79 wrote:
For those whose sensibilities are offended by this question because you are thinking from a bodybuilder’s point of view (pack on as much muscle in as short a period of time as possible), let me remind you that I’m speaking from a standpoint of someone who would want to induce a state of hypertrophy, without adding fat and without time being a factor.[/quote]

You are an idiot. Go ponder this shit for another 10 years. You said it yourself - time isn’t a factor, right? And you don’t want to add any of that pesky fat. Whaaaaa…there, there.

[quote]Quark79 wrote:
Everybody will emphasize the importance of caloric intake and the fact that it must be above maintenance in order to ensure hypertrophy. And to maximize hypertrophy, above maintenance caloric intake is obviously a necessity.

However, caloric intake is not the only factor leading to hypertrophy. The other factors are:
-Quality of Training/Training Frequency
-Hormonal Levels
-Quality of Nutrition
-Bone Structure
-Muscle Structure
-Strength
-Individual Genetics
-Recovery

Now because Nutrition is a factor that we can directly manipulate, it gets the most attention (along with Training and Recovery) in regards to hypertrophy and rightly so.

However my question is, to what extent can hypertrophy occur at maintenance (or even slightly below) levels of caloric intake if the levels of Recovery and Training are intact?

For those whose sensibilities are offended by this question because you are thinking from a bodybuilder’s point of view (pack on as much muscle in as short a period of time as possible), let me remind you that I’m speaking from a standpoint of someone who would want to induce a state of hypertrophy, without adding fat and without time being a factor.

[/quote]

People who approach this like you don’t make much progress…if any at all. They sit around and think they will magically induce a significant difference in body composition until they realize 20 years have passed and they have only (maybe) gained 5lbs of muscle mass. Meanwhile, all of those people not so damn afraid of gaining a little body fat in an effort to gain an even greater amount of muscle mass look completely different and reached their goals over a decade earlier.

I hope people like you continue to believe that time is not a factor. It isn’t until you run out of it that you realize it is.

I don’t understand. You come to a bodybuilding website to ask how you can gain muscle without using bodybuilding methods.

Everyone here will tell you to eat a lot and lift progressively heavier weights. Sorry, but that’s all we know.