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Hyperlordotic. Any Advice or Experience?


#1

I just figured out why I have such lower back problems and I am pretty fvcking pissed about. Why? I've been to a doctor MANY MANY MANY times about this and not one diagnosed me with this issue which I could have worked on a long time ago. I just noticed it now as I decided I didn't feel like my squat form was really good.

So I stood in the mirror today with a wooden dowel on my back and tried to squat perfect...chest up and I COULD NOT DO IT. Physically impossible without me falling backwards. I just did some research and figured it out. This is me:

What is Neutral Spine and Why Does Sticking Out In Back Harm?

I think I have some issues with hip flexors being tight. I did order a book that's specifically to help remedy this issue, but would love to hear from someone who has gone through this.

Zach


#2

I can't know for sure without putting you through some tests, but mobilizing the hips is definitely a good place start. For the average person with your problems, they are unstable in the core an immobile in the hips, manifesting in low back problems, commonly hyperlordosis. I had the same problem. If I had to guess, I would say you probably also have tight lats, decreased internal rotation of the hips in flexion, and under-activated glutes.

Try going to see a DC with an Functional Movement Screen certification (FMS) or one who is a Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES).


#3

Thank you a lot for replying. I think a lot of it has to do with my hips. I've been doing some hip mobilization drills and stuff. I also have been hip stretching and have noticed my right hip is attrocious as far as my ROM. I've been doing the hip stretch where you lay on your back and make a figure four and pull the leg back. I can barely get perpendicular. My girlfriend can pull her knees to her face. So yeah definitely a problem. Lats are a bit tight too. I can't grab my fingers with the behind the back/over the back mobility test.

But it's weird, I'm pretty flexible everywhere else.

Doc appointment on Nov 8 and in the mean time, I ordered a book that was specifically written to help alleviate this called the "Ab Revolution". Crossing my fingers...

BTW- you sound like you have a lot of experience with this. How long in your experience does it take to correct something like this? I know it can vary depending on the severity.


#4

I have to deal more with posterior pelvic tilt than anterior but how is your ankle mobility? That has been significant in letting me squat better.


#5

To the OP, the stretch you described with the figure 4 on your back stretches you piriformis, which is not a hip flexor. You wanna do a half-kneeling hip flexor stretch, or if possible get someone to do a Thomas Stretch on you. Look that one up. I personally have the exact same problem and my advice is coming to you as a Physical Therapist. I get one of the other PT's at my clinic to give me a good stretch on leg days and you can't imagine the difference. Hope that helps.


#6

Thanks guys! That Thomas Stretch sounds amazing, but pretty complicated to the point where I would need someone to show me that I'm doing it right. I have a doc appointment on Nov 8 and am going to ask for a specialist..either a physical therapist or a chiropractor.

And with the figure four stretch, is it still worth doing since it seems it's so tight?


#7

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#8

This sounds like another amazing stretch. How many 60 second rounds? like 3-5? I don't want to over do it.