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Hyperextending Lower Back

Hi All,
As far as I remember I had problem hyperextending my lower back in exercises like back squat and deadlift. The problem starts with very low weights so lately I just did some auxiliary exercises instead of main lifts (cable one leg deadlifts with row as preached by Dean Somerset, step ups). I know that stretching quads and hip flexors along with glutes and ab work should help so for now I do just that (anterior pelvic tilt)…

What else ca I do? Any specific auxiliary exercises (mainly to improve my DL, SQ is less of a problem)? How can I practice DL to improve my form in regards to this?
Thanks!

I find this a bit confusing. If you are hyperextending your lower back on say, deadlifts, just stop doing that lol. I mean it’s a simple form fix of stopping the lift once you are standing straight up instead of continuing to lean backwards. You shouldn’t need any auxiliary lifts or stretches for it I would imagine.

I was informed the other day that I appear to hyper extend my back when I squat like the OP says he does, I appear to be confusing a hyper-extended back with a flat straight one, any thoughts?

Good advice in general for hyperextended backs with any exercise is to contract your abs hard throughout the movement–this prevents your back from hyperextending too much.

[quote]csulli wrote:
I find this a bit confusing. If you are hyperextending your lower back on say, deadlifts, just stop doing that lol. I mean it’s a simple form fix of stopping the lift once you are standing straight up instead of continuing to lean backwards. You shouldn’t need any auxiliary lifts or stretches for it I would imagine. [/quote]

csulli, I mean that I hyperextend during the movement, and not on the top (where it’s easier to fire glutes and abs). It’s very hard for me to maintain neutral pelvis position.

[quote]Sportowiec wrote:

[quote]csulli wrote:
I find this a bit confusing. If you are hyperextending your lower back on say, deadlifts, just stop doing that lol. I mean it’s a simple form fix of stopping the lift once you are standing straight up instead of continuing to lean backwards. You shouldn’t need any auxiliary lifts or stretches for it I would imagine. [/quote]

csulli, I mean that I hyperextend during the movement, and not on the top (where it’s easier to fire glutes and abs). It’s very hard for me to maintain neutral pelvis position. [/quote]
Okay so your lower back arch is too exaggerated on squat and deadlift. I understand now. I have seen people doing that before, but unfortunately I don’t really know what to work on to get to a more neutral spine position. Sorry for the mixup!

[quote]Sportowiec wrote:

[quote]csulli wrote:
I find this a bit confusing. If you are hyperextending your lower back on say, deadlifts, just stop doing that lol. I mean it’s a simple form fix of stopping the lift once you are standing straight up instead of continuing to lean backwards. You shouldn’t need any auxiliary lifts or stretches for it I would imagine. [/quote]

csulli, I mean that I hyperextend during the movement, and not on the top (where it’s easier to fire glutes and abs). It’s very hard for me to maintain neutral pelvis position. [/quote]

Flex your abs harder and make them stronger.

OK, I will focus more on really strong contraction of abs (working on making them as strong as possible) but it’s hard to maintain during the set. I will try shorter sets - that should help.
I’ve seen some mobility wod episode about this problem. Kelly advices to puch knees out and fire external hip rotators. Any experience with that? Maybe I could try some bands around the knees to make those abductors work in a proper way?

Anything else I can do?