T Nation

Hunger Issues...


#1

Just a little about myself. I'm 32 years old 6'1 and currently weigh 275lbs. I've been away from working out now for about 12 years and just recently started lifting again about a month ago when I hit my highest weight of my life at 296lbs. The first few weeks I was hungry for most of the day. Now it seems like I wanna consume everything in sight. My question, is this normal and what can I do to curb it?


#2

Introducing/ reintroducing activity will increase your nutritional demands and hunger. What does a average day f eating look like for you?


#3

I’d use this as an opportunity to make important changes in your diet.

Not because your current hunger experience makes that necessary, but it would be a way of simultaneously addressing the immediate issue and more importantly implementing long term changes.

I’m going to guess that your carb consumption has been relatively high, and your body is poor at using fat for fuel.

Your added activity would then be causing so much hunger because although there’s a ton of fuel available (bodyfat) your metabolism is poor at utilizing fatty acids and preferentially uses carbs. Glycogen (carb storage) is being used up in exercise.

I’d take this as an opportunity to cut carbs back to 200 g/day. You’ll likely experience a period of being hungry but now this will be to a use: getting your metabolism adapted to being able to burn fat as a major fuel source.


#4

This is were you start “cleaning up” your diet. Vegatables and fiber and those kind of things. Oatmeal keeps you “fuller,” longer than Captain Crunch. Salads fill you up “better” than french fries. Sweet potato is more “quality” than a dinner roll.

Not some radical change in your entire life style, just working more good stuff into your daily food intake.


#5

[quote]TheLastDon wrote:
I’m 32 years old 6’1 and currently weigh 275lbs

just recently started lifting again about a month ago when I hit my highest weight of my life at 296lbs.[/quote]
You lost just over 20 pounds in one month? Even at your size, that’s a lot of weight. I’m wondering if you didn’t crash diet (intentionally or not) and simply take in too few calories.

Being hungry when trying to drop fat is avoidable, but it’s also common. Just ask any pre-contest bodybuilder. But being ravenously/distractingly hungry all day everyday is obviously something we want to avoid.

What, exactly, did you eat yesterday?

And what does your current training look like? The days, exercises, sets, and reps for weight training; and the days, time, and intensity for cardio.

Basically, I want to make sure you’re not trying to exercise too much on too few calories. On paper, that might sound like the fastest way to progress, but in reality, it’s the fastest way to set yourself up for stalled results and then a quick rebound of weight gain.


#6

[quote]FlatsFarmer wrote:
This is were you start “cleaning up” your diet. Vegatables and fiber and those kind of things. Oatmeal keeps you “fuller,” longer than Captain Crunch. Salads fill you up “better” than french fries. Sweet potato is more “quality” than a dinner roll.

Not some radical change in your entire life style, just working more good stuff into your daily food intake.[/quote]

I simply will not tolerate any trash talking of Captain Crunch, I am 5’ 9" 250lbs and the Captain is responsible for a large portion of that.

What do you want-for people to wither and blow away?

And then you have the effrontery to suggest that a sweet potato will be more satisfying that a dinner roll?

Balderdash!

My God man this nutrition shit has gone to far.

Listen there is nothing that a bowl of the Captain can do to you that a couple sets of breathing squats cant undo. Hell if you do the squats right after the consumption of the cereal, you will probably throw it up any way! The best of both worlds, you got to eat the Captain and you were motivated to do the squats.


#7

To be honest Chris I’m almost certain I crash dieted but not on purpose. I really just wasn’t hungry. As for what I ate yesterday. I had no breakfast ten I had a grilled cheese for lunch and then for dinner I had 8oz of fish with roasted red potatoes. My workout is currently the 5 day split from jefit. I workout 5 days a week and I do it around 5 in the evening. I do a mile on the treadmill before I do weight workouts. Some days I’m not hungry then some days I make poor eating decisions. I grab things on the fly when I have time and that leads to bad food choices.


#8

Just really quickly, I would say try eating breakfast, lunch and then dinner.

Even if breakfast is a protien shake and a banana.

Have something a couple hours before you workout. A sandwich and some carrot sticks would be better than something from the gas-station.

Fish and roasted red potatos sounds good for dinner. Just add a little broccoli or something.

Start simple. Do the easy stuff. At this point, changes can only improve your diet.


#9

[quote]TheLastDon wrote:
I had no breakfast ten I had a grilled cheese for lunch and then for dinner I had 8oz of fish with roasted red potatoes.[/quote]
Okay, so like, maybe 1,000 calories if we’re rounding up? Dude, that’s literally less than half of what you should be eating. Even if you’re trying to drop fat. This is one of the better step-by-step approaches to setting up a fat loss nutrition plan:

Like Flats said, grabbing breakfast, lunch, and dinner everyday is the cornerstone. For sure, a lot of people get good results eating every three hours, but it’s not necessary. And in your case, it might be more of an issue (for schedule, planning, not missing a meal, etc.).

I tried looking around there and it seems like there are a bunch of different 5-day splits, some better designed than others. I’d consider one of these programs instead, just to make sure your training is optimal:



Good call, but switch the cardio to right after the weights to avoid sapping strength and performance from the weight work. Also, keeping it at one mile is fine, but try to finish the mile a little faster each week, even if it’s only a few seconds faster. That kind of progress of pushing the time/speed instead of the distance will boost the intensity and overall fat loss effect.

Super common situation with an under-appreciated solution: Weekly meal prep.

Dan John once said something along the lines of, when you’re trying to lose fat, it’s worth spending two “gym days” and, instead of hitting the gym for an hour, go food shopping and then cook stuff in big batches so your kitchen is plenty-stocked with all the right food.



#10

In my above post, I was assuming (shouldn’t have) that you were posting about being very hungry from it being an unusual thing, to be abnormally hungry despite reasonable calories for dieting.

Instead it looks, from the example anyway, that your calories are far too low, which makes it an entirely different question. Your body (broadly speaking) is giving you the exact signal it should. You feel hungry because you should eat more than you were doing on that day!

From the post it’s not clear whether you’re a naturally big-muscled guy and might now be say 50 lb overfat, or not so muscled and 100 lb overfat. So it’s impossible to closely estimate what your minimum calories should be. But for example, I’d suggest at least 2100 cal/day now, after your recent major weight drop.