T Nation

HST Time


#1

Hello!

I plan on starting a HST cycle,how does the routine over here look?

i40.tinypic.com/2804fpk.jpg

It's from the official HST website.

Thank you :slight_smile:


#2

Sign up for coaching and workout critique with me.


#3

Always wondered about HST… When you read the site it seems to all make sense, and claims to be the Best Mass gaining routine bar none

Been around for some time though…

That being the case, why isn’t everyone doing it? (At least everyone who’s trying to put on size)

Not necessarily trying to be sarcastic here but…

Or is it that we just pull little pointers out of it, like Strategic deconditioning, or adding weight every workout while dropping reps per set and clustering.

Even the guy on the Website Boris Kleine they say “uses HST Principles” What other pros use it if it’s so effective (Anticipating Drug/steroid argument here lol)

Isn’t Strategic Deconditioning the same as Supercompensation?

I cluster sometimes, overtime increase poundages and change rep ranges, then I’m using HST too then?

Guess what I’m trying to say is, do we have here, first hand, any unbiased information that HST (out of the box as packaged on the website) is more effective than say 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps


#4

I tried it once…and never did it again :slight_smile: Maybe it’s just me, but it didn’t give me better result than a 3xweek split, 3x8-12 (what I was doing before).


#5

Bwahahahaha.

Don’t listen to Bricknyce.
Sign up with me instead!


#6

No doubt, CC.

The program works; I used it for several months a few years.

But I have to say that Bryan Haycock’s exercise selection is a major set-up for injury; and most coaches would agree with me.

Performing quad-dominant exercises like squats leg presses and squats with only leg curls for hamstrings and no single-leg exercises; that, I believe is a recipe for a back injury or severe muscle imbalances.

It also depends on what the person wants. Does he want to perform a TBT program and not mind the cons of such a program design?
You can have an HST program with gym frequency of six times per week, alternating between upper- and lower-body sessions in order to keep up with the 3-times-per-week-per-muscle frequency. Can you make it to the gym six times per week and recover? I know I don’t want to.

As CT says, any rationally designed routine can work. I personally don’t like to follow any cookie-cutter programs; those are any programs that I can print out from a website or e-book or copy from a magazine or book.


#7

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:
No doubt, CC.

The program works; I used it for several months a few years.

But I have to say that Bryan Haycock’s exercise selection is a major set-up for injury; and most coaches would agree with me.

Performing quad-dominant exercises like squats leg presses and squats with only leg curls for hamstrings and no single-leg exercises; that, I believe is a recipe for a back injury or severe muscle imbalances.

It also depends on what the person wants. Does he want to perform a TBT program and not mind the cons of such a program design?
You can have an HST program with gym frequency of six times per week, alternating between upper- and lower-body sessions in order to keep up with the 3-times-per-week-per-muscle frequency. Can you make it to the gym six times per week and recover? I know I don’t want to.

As CT says, any rationally designed routine can work. I personally don’t like to follow any cookie-cutter programs; those are any programs that I can print out from a website or e-book or copy from a magazine or book.
[/quote]

Well said.

One should also ask: Do I need such an approach to reach my goal?
Do I need to work all my lifts in 3 different rep ranges every week?
Etc…

You don’t need it to get up to 290, I know that from personal experience and from the experience of the guys I’m helping out.

You also don’t need it to get to 160, I know that from personal experience and that of the guys I’m helping out as well…

And you sure as hell don’t need it to get strong, so yeah.


#8

Right.

The HST program doesn’t use three different rep schemes throughout the week; it uses three different ones over the course of 8 weeks.

First two week: 15s
Next two weeks: 10s
Next two weeks: 5s
Next two weeks: 5s with optional negatives and drop-sets

It’s not a bad program and I’m considering utlizing the scheme with my own exercise selection in my TBT program. I think my exercise selection is far more balanced. See here:

A Day:
Explosive upper body exercise (usually speed bench or plyo-pushup)
Squat
Stepup
Overhead press
Lat pulldown or chinup
Ab-wheel

B Day:
Explosive lower body exercise (usually jump or speed box squat or muscle snatch)
GHR
Lunges
Dumbbell bench press
Dumbbell row
T-pushup

I’ll use the schemes 3x5, 4x4, and 5x3 for the explosive exercises.

For everything else, I’ll use the HST scheme. See my exercise selection; I believe the plan is far more balanced for structure with my selection.


#9

Also, it’s not just using rep schemes. There is a built in ramp-up to it.

Let’s take the two weeks of 15s for example.
There will be six workouts for each bodypart in two weeks and only one exercise is performed for each bodypart. Here’s how a planned ramp-up to 200 pounds for an exercise:

Workout 1: 150 x 15
Workout 2: 160 x 15
Workout 3: 170 x 15
Workout 4: 180 x 15
Workout 5: 190 x 15
Workout 6: 200 x 15

The reasoning is that you don’t have to lift maximal to see growth, especially after strategic deconditioning. I agree with this; you don’t have to lift maximal all the time to see growth.


#10

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:
Right.

The HST program doesn’t use three different rep schemes throughout the week; it uses three different ones over the course of 8 weeks.
[/quote] Did it ever, though? I could swear I read about that before… Years ago, however. That was basically 3 full body sessions per week, first 5, then 10, then 15 or maybe the other way around… Or am I confusing HST with something else? Oh well.[quote]
First two week: 15s
Next two weeks: 10s
Next two weeks: 5s
Next two weeks: 5s with optional negatives and drop-sets

It’s not a bad program and I’m considering utlizing the scheme with my own exercise selection in my TBT program. I think my exercise selection is far more balanced. See here:

A Day:
Explosive upper body exercise (usually speed bench or plyo-pushup)
Squat
Stepup
Overhead press
Lat pulldown or chinup
Ab-wheel

B Day:
Explosive lower body exercise (usually jump or speed box squat or muscle snatch)
GHR
Lunges
Dumbbell bench press
Dumbbell row
T-pushup

I’ll use the schemes 3x5, 4x4, and 5x3 for the explosive exercises.

For everything else, I’ll use the HST scheme. See my exercise selection; I believe the plan is far more balanced for structure with my selection. [/quote]

Hmm. Seems ok, balance-wise, though I would just use a regular progression method instead of that fancy one, to be honest. Then again, regular bb progression works best when you’re eating a ton…

Hey, have you ever considered using Jim Wendler’s original 5/3/1 (no worries, no max singles included) template (3 days a week, 4 different workouts total)?
You can likely still make decent progress there even on a budget, food-wise (I’ve had a month of bad eating and my strength kept going up, albeit not at race-car speed ;)…
Assistance work templates are available in many different variants or you could make up your own easily…

Anyway, good luck with your training brother.


#11

[quote]Bricknyce wrote:
Also, it’s not just using rep schemes. There is a built in ramp-up to it.

Let’s take the two weeks of 15s for example.
There will be six workouts for each bodypart in two weeks and only one exercise is performed for each bodypart. Here’s how a planned ramp-up to 200 pounds for an exercise:

Workout 1: 150 x 15
Workout 2: 160 x 15
Workout 3: 170 x 15
Workout 4: 180 x 15
Workout 5: 190 x 15
Workout 6: 200 x 15

The reasoning is that you don’t have to lift maximal to see growth, especially after strategic deconditioning. I agree with this; you don’t have to lift maximal all the time to see growth.
[/quote]

5/3/1 also works with submaximal effort and it’s working for me, so I agree as well. HST is still too fancy for me :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:


#12

I think HST is only fancy with that ramp-up stuff. But all it takes to map out is 15 minutes with a keyboard or pen and paper.

My program is influenced by Dos Remedios and Cosgrove. I love it. As I said, I don’t train like a bodybuilder anymore.

My current rep scheme looks like this:

Monday: 2x12, explosive exercises: 3x5
Wednesday: 3x8, explosive: 4x4
Friday: 4x4, explosive: 5x3

It works great for me. I got that sort of scheme from Cosgrove. There’s no fancy ramping up. I just progress normally.

I’ve outlined my current diet in the Nutrition forum; I’m on Lyle McDonald’s Rapid Fat Loss diet. It’s protein-sparing modified fast with a carbup and a cheat meal. It works great!


#13

[quote]Cephalic_Carnage wrote:
I could swear I read about that before… Years ago, however. That was basically 3 full body sessions per week, first 5, then 10, then 15 or maybe the other way around… O
[/quote]

Sounds like Big Beyond Belief or Bulgarian Burst… I get those confused.


#14

I cannot squat or deadlift therefore HST might fail for me?Would it still work without these 2 exercises?


#15

[quote]Scott M wrote:
Cephalic_Carnage wrote:
I could swear I read about that before… Years ago, however. That was basically 3 full body sessions per week, first 5, then 10, then 15 or maybe the other way around… O

Sounds like Big Beyond Belief or Bulgarian Burst… I get those confused. [/quote]

Hmmm. I’m fairly certain that it was either an (now outdated) incarnation of HST, or that the article was simply messed up…


#16

If I want to do smth. that will help my endurance,bf dropping, can I consider this?

3x/week > 2x10: Leg ext & LEG CURLS
Barbell bench press& incline db press
Lat pulldown&bent over rows
Db lateral raises&military press
Barbell curls
Triceps Pushdown
Crunches