T Nation

How to Wear a Lever Belt?


#1

So I have been using my "Stronger" lever belt from elitfts.com It works well, however I have to make adjustments with certain lifts. My main concern though is am I wearing it properly. When I wrap the belt, the lever is located on my left side. I noticed that some lifters have it set like this while others have the lever set to the center. Am I suppose to turn the belt around making sure that the lever is completely center at my waist? If so, the logo in the back is not centered from behind, or is that a poor way gauge how the lever should be set? Im getting confused now after watching other lifters train with a similar belt that I have.

Thanks


#2

[quote]shiz wrote:
So I have been using my “Stronger” lever belt from elitfts.com It works well, however I have to make adjustments with certain lifts. My main concern though is am I wearing it properly. When I wrap the belt, the lever is located on my left side. I noticed that some lifters have it set like this while others have the lever set to the center. Am I suppose to turn the belt around making sure that the lever is completely center at my waist? If so, the logo in the back is not centered from behind, or is that a poor way gauge how the lever should be set? Im getting confused now after watching other lifters train with a similar belt that I have.

Thanks[/quote]

I use different belts for different lifts. I can’t have a tight belt when I pull but need it tight when I squat. I have a bigger gut so pulling I have to let the belt out some in order to get down to the bar. Squatting I like it tight because it clamps down harder when I get into the hole.


#3

Thanks for the info. I tend to make adjustments my self. Like in the Squat I like it tight but with the Deadlift I like it a little loose. However, where should the lever be adjusted at? I see people have the levers located on their side or are the belts suppose to be positioned where the lever is shown to be in the front?


#4

[quote]shiz wrote:
Thanks for the info. I tend to make adjustments my self. Like in the Squat I like it tight but with the Deadlift I like it a little loose. However, where should the lever be adjusted at? I see people have the levers located on their side or are the belts suppose to be positioned where the lever is shown to be in the front?[/quote]

I don’t think there is a correct way to do it since you see many people doing it differently, especially if you see variations among the strongest lifters. The main thing to keep in mind with a belt is that it should not be so tight or placed in a way that it alters your spine position compared to not wearing a belt. It also shouldn’t be so loose that you get no additional intra-abdominal pressure compared to without because that is the whole point of wearing one.

I wear mine with the lever slightly to the left. I have tried other positions but it doesn’t feel right because I broke it in that way.


#5

Left, Right, Center, it’s all preference. Some people depending on how they pull ( sumo comes to mind ) can’t have the lever off to a side or it pinches the inside of an arm or even worse could flip open.

If you have a large belt and dieted down 40lbs that large belt may now be too large and you have to wrap a bit extra around the inside of the belt meaning if you don’t position the lever appropriately the inner wrap will dig into your abs making for a painful lift.

There is no right or wrong way if that’s what you’re asking.


#6

Have the lever set in the position that allows you to lift the most weight.


#7

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Have the lever set in the position that allows you to lift the most weight.[/quote]

Very much this. Also for belt position and tightness.


#8

[quote]corstijeir wrote:
if you don’t position the lever appropriately the inner wrap will dig into your abs making for a painful lift.[/quote]
This.


#9

When I wear my lever belt, it really digs into my ribs, making it painful to finish my lift. What can I do to fix this?


#10

Lower it


#11

Wear it looser or further down closer to your hips.


#12

Lever Action Belt Buckle Placement

As everyone has stated, it is an individual preference.

The overall objective of the belt is enable you to push/pull more weight via providing intra abdominal pressure, IAP.

This is accomplished by isometrically contracting the abdominal muscle into the belt.

This isometric contraction provide more support for your back, core. Greater core stability translates to pushing/pulling more weight.

Let’s expand this as to why…

Core Leakage

Dr Stuart McGill’s (Professor of Spine Biomechanics at the University of Waterloo) research has demonstrated core stiffness is a major determinate in the amount of weight you are able to push/pull.

The greater core stiffness, the more you lift.,

If you core is weak, “Leakage” occurs. That meaning the core is more limp. Energy (Strength and Power) are lost. Thus, you lift less.

Increasing Ab/Core Strength

The belt allows you to isometrically contract your abdominal muscle into the belt promoting greater core stiffness.

The stronger your abdominal muscle are, the greater your abdominal isometric contraction is, the more Strength and Power you generate.

With that said, additional Ab/Core Strength increases your Strength and Power. Additional Ab Training is mandatory for Long Torso lifters.

The Torso is “The Bridge” that connects the Lower and Upper Body. As with all bridges, the longer the bridge the more support it need.

osu122975

…makes a good point, “I use different belts for different lifts.” It is addressed in…

The Belt And The Deadlift

As Rippetoe points out, a 4 inch (10 cm) Belt for some individual impair their Deadlift Technique.

Solutions

As the article noted, there are two solutions…

  1. “… 2-3 inches wide” Belt that is tapered in the front.

  2. “… A much higher position, well off the hips” with a 4 inch (10 cm) Belt, as demonstrated in the.Konstantin Konstantinovs video attached.

The higher belt position often is more effective for Conventional Deadlifters who have some Thoracic/Upper Back Rounding.

Upper Back Deadlifters intuitively use this method to pull more weight. Upper Back Rounding enables lifter to decrease Torque (which magnifies the bar weight beyond it true load) by keeping the weight closer to the Body’s Center of Gravity, COG.

Upper Back Rounding is okay. Lower Back Rounding is counter productive.

Kenny Croxdale