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How to Start Off Heavy??

Well i haven’t been able to really dedicate myself to lifting other than the stregnth training class offered at school…but what i use to do was just the 10 reps per 3 sets…now i really wanna bulk up and go heavy…but how should i start?

I know i need to change my diet into a 5 small meal diet throughout the day that’s protein rih, lots of water, no junk foods, soda, ect…which i can do with ease, but how should i start off lifting…i mean i don’t wanna just jump right into trying to bench 150 for 5 reps for 3 sets…just a lil advice woud be nice…thanks

Just up the weight. No matter how you cut it, if you were doing a weight for 10 reps, it means you could’ve gone heavier for fewer reps. How much heavier depends on the person of course.

Warm up, start off +5 whatever you were doing for 10 reps and go for 5 reps. If you feel like you could’ve done more (meaning you didn’t go near failure), then up another 5. I would do this up to 5 sets. If by then you have not hit your limit, save it for the next chest workout.

Always do this type of thing, especially if you’re a beginner. You don’t want to suddenly load on a lot of weight that your body is not used to. Slow and steady.

Another thing to watch out for when adding weight is form. A lot of people get caught up in adding weight and start to cheat. cough quarter squats cough

btw, forgot to mention.

If you’re going heavy, you usually wouldn’t be going from 3 sets of 10 reps down to 3 sets of 5 reps.

You would be doing more like 5 sets of 5 reps or 8 sets of 3 reps.

Here’s the thing. You can’t go heavy and bulk up at the same time. Going heavy means going beyond 85% of your RM, which is not that effective for hypertrophy. Bulking up would get you down to 70-80% of your RM, which doesn’t help you that much in strength.

I suggest you stick to your 3x10 routine since this will give you a solid foundation in doing reps with correct form (it’s important to learn proper form using light weights first) as well as bulk you up (10 RM is equal to 75% 1 RM, which is optimal for hypertrophy).

After you master form and reach a strength plateau, do pyramids with lower rep ranges (maybe a 10-8-6 pyramid) to produce more strength.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Here’s the thing. You can’t go heavy and bulk up at the same time. Going heavy means going beyond 85% of your RM, which is not that effective for hypertrophy. Bulking up would get you down to 70-80% of your RM, which doesn’t help you that much in strength.

I suggest you stick to your 3x10 routine since this will give you a solid foundation in doing reps with correct form (it’s important to learn proper form using light weights first) as well as bulk you up (10 RM is equal to 75% 1 RM, which is optimal for hypertrophy).

After you master form and reach a strength plateau, do pyramids with lower rep ranges (maybe a 10-8-6 pyramid) to produce more strength.[/quote]

I really have to disagree with most of this. First, set/rep schemes for growth tend to be individual in nature. In general terms, however, the “older” your lifting age is the fewer reps you need for hypertrophy.

I grew well when I went to a 5X5 workout. Then I went to a 10 X 3 and did well. Now I lift as a powerlifter and continue to grow, although I use mostly singles and doubles.

Second, I also disagree with using 3X10 to “learn proper form” When using higher reps form has a tendency to break down more due to fatigue and lack of focus. I agree in using lighter weights to teach form, but only until the form is learned. Otherwise, once again I recommend heavier weights and lower reps.

Third, the “10-8-6” pyramid is really pretty outdated. It can be effective to a point, but it’s not the best way to go. Stay away from the Muscle & Fiction advice.

[quote]roofus_5 wrote:
I really have to disagree with most of this. First, set/rep schemes for growth tend to be individual in nature. In general terms, however, the “older” your lifting age is the fewer reps you need for hypertrophy.

I grew well when I went to a 5X5 workout. Then I went to a 10 X 3 and did well. Now I lift as a powerlifter and continue to grow, although I use mostly singles and doubles.

Second, I also disagree with using 3X10 to “learn proper form” When using higher reps form has a tendency to break down more due to fatigue and lack of focus. I agree in using lighter weights to teach form, but only until the form is learned. Otherwise, once again I recommend heavier weights and lower reps.

Third, the “10-8-6” pyramid is really pretty outdated. It can be effective to a point, but it’s not the best way to go. Stay away from the Muscle & Fiction advice.

[/quote]

First, I made the assumption that he has a relatively young training age, which is why I recommended 3x10 at first. He can eventually progress to 5x5 and 10x3. I didn’t say he has to stop at the 10-8-6 pyramid.

Second, it’s easier to learn proper form using 3x10 than 5x5, especially at a young training age. It allows you to practice reps more often with lighter weight, and this is good for motor learning and efficiency.

It’s good to drop your ego and lift your 10 RM with good form, even if it means training light. Once you master proper form, strength should come very quickly when you switch to more intense programs.

However, if he turns out to have an older training age than I assumed, then he should stick to lower reps and higher % RM’s than I suggested.

GnP4life:

None of this matters. Especially right now. Just lift and eat. 3x10 is fine. So are sets of 5. Do whichever you like better.

[quote]Mike Benfield wrote:
GnP4life:

None of this matters. Especially right now. Just lift and eat. 3x10 is fine. So are sets of 5. Do whichever you like better.[/quote]

Yes go lift heavy shit :slight_smile:

Man on the lifting heavy wont add size etc. what is the world coming to I agree he’s young and form should be an issue but crazy statements Like that just wow.

UM Ill just add maybe look at West Side for Skinny Bastards By Joe Defranco. Great program for adding strength and size, Lifting heavy and the volume/repetition work. Coupled with lots of food of course

Phill

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Here’s the thing. You can’t go heavy and bulk up at the same time. Going heavy means going beyond 85% of your RM, which is not that effective for hypertrophy. Bulking up would get you down to 70-80% of your RM, which doesn’t help you that much in strength.
[/quote]

Wow. You don’t know what the hell you are talking about.

Please, stop giving advice.

You can’t go heavy and bulk at the same time? Damn it, NOW you tell me…after all of these years. Stupid muscles. Didn’t you know you weren’t supposed to Grow!?

[quote]Professor X wrote:
undeadlift wrote:
Here’s the thing. You can’t go heavy and bulk up at the same time. Going heavy means going beyond 85% of your RM, which is not that effective for hypertrophy. Bulking up would get you down to 70-80% of your RM, which doesn’t help you that much in strength.

Wow. You don’t know what the hell you are talking about.

Please, stop giving advice.

You can’t go heavy and bulk at the same time? Damn it, NOW you tell me…after all of these years. Stupid muscles. Didn’t you know you weren’t supposed to Grow!?[/quote]

Yeah, I’m being nicer than is probably warranted but that is crazy-bad advice.

I was trying to be nice on the other thread were you made an ass of youself, but STOP writting anything until you have read a little more.

[quote]Lando034 wrote:
I was trying to be nice on the other thread were you made an ass of youself, but STOP writting anything until you have read a little more.[/quote]

Directed to undeadlift.

Gee, I must have interpreted this thread wrongly.

http://www.T-Nation.com/findArticle.do?article=05-099-training

This is will give you a good idea where to start depending on your goals. Based from what I understand here, a certain % RM and rep scheme is optimal for size whereas another % RM and rep scheme is optimal from strength. This also depends on your training age. Don’t get me wrong. I didn’t say that you’ll get strength ONLY when lifting heavy with low reps. You’ll gain size, but to a lesser degree.

Calories + Heavy weights + Progression on said weights = Gains. That’s what I’ve been doing, still have a long way to go, but it’s a fairly linear and grueling process. I haven’t given up yet, but one you get your own routine down it will soon become like clockwork everyday.

For example, if you go from benching 135lbs to 200lbs in 8 months, you can bet money that you would of also gained muscle for your body to adapt for such a big increase in weight being used. I’d say don’t overthink anything and listen to some of the veterans on the forums here, the advice you get is invaluable.

[quote]TKL.ca wrote:
Calories + Heavy weights + Progression on said weights = Gains. [/quote]

That pretty much adds it up, I wish someone would have told me these 3 simple facts when I first started, No reason to worry about “staying in the muscle building rep zone” or some other bs beginners get confused with.

Lift heavy shit, next workout lift heavier shit.

lets say you want to bench 150 for a couple sets, do some warmups first lets say
barx 8-10
85x3-5
115x3
135x3
working sets at 150

you might and probaly will be able to make bigger jumps than this but the reasoning is these is to warmup NOT TO TIRE YOU OUT! So just try something similar and adjust as you fell needed.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Gee, I must have interpreted this thread wrongly.

This is will give you a good idea where to start depending on your goals. Based from what I understand here, a certain % RM and rep scheme is optimal for size whereas another % RM and rep scheme is optimal from strength. This also depends on your training age. Don’t get me wrong. I didn’t say that you’ll get strength ONLY when lifting heavy with low reps. You’ll gain size, but to a lesser degree.[/quote]

Bullshit. Yes, you are confused by believing anyone has defined for all people the one way to build the most size or the most strength. This is the main reason most newbies need to AVOID worrying about what many of these authors have to say. You actually now believe that someone will gain less muscle mass by going heavier. Meanwhile, take a look at how the people who actually are big train.

The fact that we are not all exactly alike is why you can’t walk around making rules like that. I lift heavy with low reps. I don’t calculate the percentage of shit and I am betting that most of the people worried about things like that are making less overall progress.

Worry less about what author has posted what on this forum and more on what is actually showing progress in the gym. The basics that have built the largest and strongest bodies on this planet haven’t changed much.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Bullshit. Yes, you are confused by believing anyone has defined for all people the one way to build the most size or the most strength. This is the main reason most newbies need to AVOID worrying about what many of these authors have to say. You actually now believe that someone will gain less muscle mass by going heavier. Meanwhile, take a look at how the people who actually are big train.

The fact that we are not all exactly alike is why you can’t walk around making rules like that. I lift heavy with low reps. I don’t calculate the percentage of shit and I am betting that most of the people worried about things like that are making less overall progress.

Worry less about what author has posted what on this forum and more on what is actually showing progress in the gym. The basics that have built the largest and strongest bodies on this planet haven’t changed much.[/quote]

I don’t think you understood the article I linked that much. It doesn’t restrict you. CT didn’t say that THIS is the way to train. It empowers you with knowledge so that not only can you train harder, but smarter as well. A little knowledge shouldn’t be a cause of worry.

Have you even bothered reading the conclusion of the article I linked?

See? No restrictions. Just knowledge. There are also a few recommendations here, but for the most part, stick to the conclusion.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
I don’t think you understood the article I linked that much. It doesn’t restrict you. CT didn’t say that THIS is the way to train. It empowers you with knowledge so that not only can you train harder, but smarter as well. A little knowledge shouldn’t be a cause of worry.[/quote]

A “little knowledge” can kill you. A “little knowledge” is just enough to get yourself in trouble if your knowledge about a subject isn’t complete. One thing some of you on this forum seem to skip is that just because I don’t run into the details at the drop of a hat doesn’t mean I don’t have the ability.

Most experienced lifters take an article as simply an article. I like CT. I could care less about EVERYTHING CT has to say on this subject. Why? Because I’m not lacking in the experience department when it comes to what I know works for me. I am also not beneath CT when it comes to education.

If anything he states is of use to me, I may add it into what I currently do. Only newbies take these articles as “law”. That is why that statement you made of “[quote]You’ll gain size, but to a lesser degree.[/quote]” is complete horse-shit. With that one statement, you took that article and made it LAW.

You have now tried to convince someone else that this is truly the way all things work…as if they won’t be gaining as much if they train heavy…because CT said so.

The problem, dear misguided one, isn’t the authors on this forum. The problem would be the lemmings running around like little cultists turning the words they write into law and religion.

No, I think I can understand an article on this forum just fine. I also understand enough to not give an article on this forum any more credit when it comes to what rings as the end-all-truth in weight lifting than the articles I read in bodybuilding magazines.

[quote]

See? No restrictions. Just knowledge. There are also a few recommendations here, but for the most part, stick to the conclusion.[/quote]

Dumbass. YOU made the restrictions.

Until you understand that, it is pointless to continue.

Yeah you’re right. It’s pointless to continue. I’m sorry if I tried to help the wrong way.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
You have now tried to convince someone else that this is truly the way all things work…as if they won’t be gaining as much if they train heavy…because CT said so.

The problem, dear misguided one, isn’t the authors on this forum. The problem would be the lemmings running around like little cultists turning the words they write into law and religion.[/quote]

Man, this is so true. If all a person can do is parrot what he’s read on this site, he really shouldn’t be commenting. But then the forum would have 99% fewer posts.