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How to Set Up Notebook/Training Log?


#1

Hey guys

I love training and I'm really getting serious with it. I've noted that a lot of the serious lifters keep a training log in a notebook. What should I use for a notebook and how should I set up my logs?

Thanks guys

Drago


#2

There is really no set template for this as long as you can tell whats going on but personally mine looks…

Date- Whats being Trained

Movement x weight x sets at that weight x reps
etc
etc
etc

Notes- If any.


#3

Thanks reed ill go with that.


#4

Basically what Reed said. I was originally logging things in a spreadsheet with just the numbers, but I’ve found that actually keeping more detailed notes helped. Here and there I have notes on energy levels, injuries, mood. Most of that stuff seemed unimportant, but it’s been valuable to have it.

My personal template is like this:

Date

Notes about anything that happened between last workout session and now.

Movement 1
Weight Used: Sets x Reps
– Notes (e.g., felt easier than expected, used wider hand spacing, shoulder started hurting during 3rd set)

Movement 2
etc.

Overall impression of the session, things I might change, etc.


#5

Mine looks like this.

I use Moleskine notebooks because they are durable and I love the look and feel of them. Almost like having Ernest Hemingway as a workout partner (that would be AWESOME).

I’ve recently started to use a whole page for each workout, structuring it in this manner:

Date

things I did to warm up

exercises & weights used

cooldown (usually just stretches)

additional notes if I have something to say to my future self. A few weeks ago, e.g., I wrote “do not back squat 3x a week again, your knees will hate you” :wink:


#6

[quote]Drago44 wrote:
What should I use for a notebook[/quote]
I’m not exactly sure how to interpret this question. Use a notebook for a notebook. I use a simple spiral bound, usually a small 70 pager, one page per workout.

I make sure to write the day and date, exercises, intended sets and reps (written before the first set of that exercise starts), weight used and actual reps per set (written right after each set).

For extra info, you might want to consider jotting down the start and end time for the session (if you have a random session at 10pm when you usually train at 8am, it’s worth noting to account for changes in performance or if a session takes you 45 minutes one day and 65 minutes the next), and maybe general notes on how you feel (physically, mentally, etc.) during the day and/or during the session.

Above is an old pic of a random page of my training notebook. I use brackets to indicate supersets, … to indicate rest-pause sets, and made a note that I stopped a set early because one elbow was bothering me. I don’t write down my general warm-up because I do the same thing every session.


#7

Thanks for all the input guys


#8

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
I’m not exactly sure how to interpret this question. Use a notebook for a notebook. I use a simple spiral bound, usually a small 70 pager, one page per workout.
[/quote]

Using a notebook for a notebook is soooooo last century.


#9

[quote]The Anchor wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:
I’m not exactly sure how to interpret this question. Use a notebook for a notebook. I use a simple spiral bound, usually a small 70 pager, one page per workout.
[/quote]
Using a notebook for a notebook is soooooo last century.[/quote]
Yeah, yeah. You kids can all take your iPhone apps and Twitterbook updates and get off my lawn, bunch of wise-crackin’ whippersnappers.


#10

Don’t forget your weight. Some people like to weight themselves before and after to track water loss, too (some kind of indicator of how much water weight could be easily lost for a cut). That way if you gain or lose weight you have a more realistic idea of how much your squat (for example) really did go up.


#11

oh. not that i do. i fairly only much log my important sets these days. so i can cross them off as i do them instead of deluding myself that sets have already been done. funny how heavy (for me) weights interferes with my ability to count to 5…

for the times i have kept a notebook…

i found hard cover was important for durability. spiral bound was important, too, for keeping the pen in the loop (i recommend a loop big enough for you to do that) and for being able to open it out to todays plan. ymmv.


#12

[quote]alexus wrote:
funny how heavy (for me) weights interferes with my ability to count to 5…
[/quote]

My gym has shitloads of 2.5 plates so I’ll just make a stack of them and add a new plate for every set that I complete. So whenever I lose count, I can look at the number of plates as a reminder.