T Nation

How to Deal with Annoying People in the Gym


#3

Yeah next time I guess I will man up and speak to them


#4

Wear headphones and ignore them. Focus on your own training and let them do whatever the fuck they want as long as they’re not directly influencing you.
Then if their unreasonable behaviour does impact on you, be a man and politely ask them to fix it and not do that in future. If that fails and you still care then complain to the manager.


#5

[quote]Massthetics wrote:
155lb teenager lecturing them about gym etticate.

[/quote]

Don’t.


#6

You are letting yourself become distracted away from your training. Every second you spend noticing and becoming frustrated is a second taken away from you concentrating on your next set.

As above, keep your head down and attend to your training. Mental toughness my friend.

I spoke to a gym owner about related issues once and was told that in total, he made more money off of the mass of nuckleheads than he made off of me.


#7

I don’t see a reason to bring anything up, unless they do something that actually interferes with you. I don’t consider them putting the DB’s back in the wrong spot as interfereing with you. Same with leaving them on the floor. It’s annoying, but not annoying enough to say anything really. Then again, I really don’t let most things bother me so it usually takes a lot for something to cross into “annoying” territory.

And don’t give advice. The only time I would be remotely open to someone giving me random advice is if the person was as big as Ronnie Coleman. Otherwise, most people (myself included) are going to think they know better then the random guy talking to them.


#8

[quote]Massthetics wrote:
Best way to tell these idiots off?[/quote]
Lead by example, and from a distance. That’s it. There’s no reason and no benefit to having a face-to-face. It’s life and sometimes twits will annoy and get in your way. Trying to fix them all with only slow you down. As plenty of other guys have said, your best bet is to phase them out and focus on your own training.

No chance, sorry. Even if you’re coming from a good place and 100% technically correct, there’s just such a slim chance anyone would be interested in hearing unsolicited advice, let alone be open to being “told what to do” (which is how they’d likely interpret it) by some random kid in the gym.

Kinda-related, we recently talked about the futility of giving advice in this thread:

If you really want to help, keep training and studying, reach your own goals and, in a year or so, get certified so you can do some work as a trainer.


#9

Agreed, just let it go.

I see SO many people squatting miles above parallel, which is my biggest pet peeve. It used to take a ton of self control to not say something, but honestly, you’re never going to make an impact on these people 99% of the time. It sucks, since it makes me feel “bad” about squatting half what these guys do (but with full ROM), so part of my ego wants to say “those don’t count!”, but really…just do you.

It bugs me when plates or bells are racked wrong/not at all, but whatever…just move them. You’re there to lift weights anyway.


#10

Story at the old gym: Guy A gives guy B advice on how to (I believe it was) squat. Guy B gets hurt (probably properly sore for the first time). Guy B sues gym and Guy A.

May be crap, but so I was told.


#11

[quote]Apothecary wrote:
I see SO many people squatting miles above parallel, which is my biggest pet peeve. It used to take a ton of self control to not say something, but honestly, you’re never going to make an impact on these people 99% of the time. It sucks, since it makes me feel “bad” about squatting half what these guys do (but with full ROM), so part of my ego wants to say “those don’t count!”, but really…just do you.
[/quote]

All of my squatting outside of competition is above parallel. I find that this makes me bigger and stronger than when I squat to parallel or below. In training, the idea of a movement “counting” is honestly pretty silly, because the point of training isn’t to display or demonstrate strength, it is to build it, much like how in competition, no one cares about building strength that day, just displaying it.

Having this mentality honestly helps prevent worrying about other people in the gym. Having no idea what someone’s goal or method is, I am in no place to judge or care about how they are training. As long as they are meeting their own goals, they are doing just fine.


#12
  1. insert headphones
  2. Get big/strong/shredded
  3. Make fun of weaklings who are dumb

Just kidding about 3…I look back 6 months ago and realize I was stupid and I’m sure if you fast forward 6 months I’ll look back again and think the same thing.


#13

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
All of my squatting outside of competition is above parallel. I find that this makes me bigger and stronger than when I squat to parallel or below. In training, the idea of a movement “counting” is honestly pretty silly, because the point of training isn’t to display or demonstrate strength, it is to build it, much like how in competition, no one cares about building strength that day, just displaying it.
[/quote]

To be fair, you know what you’re doing and it’s intentional.

A lot of people are squatting 250lb high, think that they’re awesome for squatting 250lb high, and are teaching their friends to squat 200lb+ high when their friends have no business squatting above 115lb.

I’m always amazed that their body can even stand tall with that much weight on their back.


#14

I advise girls I know on how to activate their glutes when they squat.

I feel like it’s a public service.

I’m an approachably friendly looking person (ie, >20 bodyfat) so none of them take offence.

More seriously, I echo what everyone else says. I make an extremely strong effort not to take notice of what anyone else is doing in the gym, because a) there’s a massive chance I don’t actually know better than them, and b) even if I do, they won’t give a shit.


#15

[quote]magick wrote:
To be fair, you know what you’re doing and it’s intentional.

A lot of people are squatting 250lb high, think that they’re awesome for squatting 250lb high, and are teaching their friends to squat 200lb+ high when their friends have no business squatting above 115lb.

I’m always amazed that their body can even stand tall with that much weight on their back.[/quote]

I honestly never presume to know what another person thinks or is thinking. That said, if someone thinks they are awesome for squatting 250lbs high, I don’t really see the issue. It seems as though they are training in a way that meets their goals, no?


#16

Same story at every gym, no matter where you go. Lots of people at my gym leave the bars loaded, plates on the floor etc. When I see it in action, from the same offenders, I just walk over and demonstrate how to properly put the plates back. Some of them stare at me, probably feel stupid, but does it “bother” me? Nah. I just put shit back during my rest period because I see it as an opportunity to do something rather than stand around.

Plus, a couple weeks ago I did just that - saw some guy walk away from a squat rack leaving 3 plates on each side. I was in the rack next to it, so I figure what the hell, just put it away. As I was cleaning up a couple other guys came over and started sharing their hatred for jerk offs who do that shit. Made a couple “friends” I guess.

Just lead by example if you want to make a statement. Or, you could just look the other way and mind your own business - not like you work at the gym right? Either way, both options are options but don’t lecture people or give training advice. The only time I’ve given advice is when I was asked for it, and that was like…once.


#17

I always wonder why people give a shit about this stuff. I always put my weights back, but if someone before me doesn’t extend the same courtesy, so what? It’s an opportunity for me to do some extra work and move more weight around. I should be thanking these people.

It’s all about perspective.

And no, you are absolutely not in a position to be giving ANYONE advice. Keep your own side of the street clean, everything else will fall in line.


#18

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
I always wonder why people give a shit about this stuff. I always put my weights back, but if someone before me doesn’t extend the same courtesy, so what? It’s an opportunity for me to do some extra work and move more weight around. I should be thanking these people.

It’s all about perspective.

And no, you are absolutely not in a position to be giving ANYONE advice. Keep your own side of the street clean, everything else will fall in line.[/quote]

What about if the person up next doesn’t have the physical capability to unload the 1200 lbs of 100’s you left on the leg press for your barely noticeable knee break leg presses? This happened over and over at my old gym. Old guy (stroke victim) would come in and try to get a little work done. His hands were drawn, but he could make due with 45’s. Couple times he had to ask for help unloading the leg press and it absolutely killed his pride. Most were glad to help him but he shouldn’t of had to have been put through swallowing his pride to ask just because someone was to lazy to pick up behind themselves.


#19

[quote]jbpick86 wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
I always wonder why people give a shit about this stuff. I always put my weights back, but if someone before me doesn’t extend the same courtesy, so what? It’s an opportunity for me to do some extra work and move more weight around. I should be thanking these people.

It’s all about perspective.

And no, you are absolutely not in a position to be giving ANYONE advice. Keep your own side of the street clean, everything else will fall in line.[/quote]

What about if the person up next doesn’t have the physical capability to unload the 1200 lbs of 100’s you left on the leg press for your barely noticeable knee break leg presses? This happened over and over at my old gym. Old guy (stroke victim) would come in and try to get a little work done. His hands were drawn, but he could make due with 45’s. Couple times he had to ask for help unloading the leg press and it absolutely killed his pride. Most were glad to help him but he shouldn’t of had to have been put through swallowing his pride to ask just because someone was to lazy to pick up behind themselves. [/quote]

That’s unfortunate, but that’s a very specific, unsual situation, and my reasoning still applies. Me berating the dude who left plates on the machine isn’t going to do jack shit. But if I set an example, hopefully the next guy will do the same, and so on, so that eventually the asshole who, as you said, leaves 1200 lbs on a machine, may eventually reconsider their behavior. Nobody wants to be told what to do, but people are willing to change when they see things change around them. That’s just how I look at it. Do the right thing, and hopefully it will rub off on someone else.


#20

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I honestly never presume to know what another person thinks or is thinking. That said, if someone thinks they are awesome for squatting 250lbs high, I don’t really see the issue. It seems as though they are training in a way that meets their goals, no?[/quote]

Or they could be misinformed and passing that misinformation along.


#21

Basically it annoys me more and more each gym session and im afraid someone is going to cop a barbell to the head if i don’t release my frustration. I spend my rest periods walking around the gym putting things back in the correct spot. Do idea why but when i get into the gym I have massive OCD.


#22

[quote]magick wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
I honestly never presume to know what another person thinks or is thinking. That said, if someone thinks they are awesome for squatting 250lbs high, I don’t really see the issue. It seems as though they are training in a way that meets their goals, no?[/quote]

Or they could be misinformed and passing that misinformation along.[/quote]

They could be, but that is a gamble, and subjective as well. There are so many varying opinions on training here that to claim that one method is the correct way and another is a misinformed way becomes tricky.

I think the most difficult idea is the concept that some people do not train with a goal of progress. Many people train purely with a goal of training. In most cases, its so that they can tell people that they go to the gym and work out, and thus, the sheer presence of being in the gym and doing anything is accomplishing their goal.

It’s why I don’t tend to judge what people are doing at the gym, because I have no idea what their goals could be, and therefore would not know the best way to achieve them.