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How to be a Lifter and a Boxer at the Same Time?


#1

I guess all I’m looking for is some guidance.

Lifting is my one and only serious hobby, 90% of my free time is used lifting, however recently I’ve wanted to start boxing properly however like most people when starting something new I’m finding time to be an issue. I lift about 5-6 days a week at the moment and I’m more than willing to cut that down to 4 days of lifting if need be.
I’m looking for a routine for someone who wants to lift and box but prioritises lifting above boxing at roughly a 60/40 ratio. I’ve looked online for some ideas but most routines or suggestions seem to prioritise boxing FAR more.
Are there any routines that would fit these sort of specifications?


#2

How often do you box? There are plenty of good 4x/week lifting programs out there. Westside for Skinny Bastards 3 (WS4SB3) comes to mind. It’ll be difficult to progress in boxing lifting that much (assuming you have a job etc as well). You’ll also need to to do some kind of roadwork/conditioning if you’re at all serious about boxing. Boxing is still the best conditioning for boxing, but most people can’t train often enough. WS4SB3 has a 4 day template that incorporates lifting with conditioning. It’s not perfect, but it’s not bad either, especially if you’re mostly boxing for fun.


#3

When you say boxing properly - do you mean competing?


#4

I think its tough. I used to fight Muay Thai and couldn’t fully commit to lifting as a result. I think you also need to communicate with your coach so that you don’t end up with any surprise conditioning sessions after heavy lifting sessions.

If lifting is your main thing, prioritize that and box when you can. If boxing is your main thing, I’d only do the main lifts, personally in 5/3/1 bare minimum format.

I think Wendler had an article showing training needs hierarchy. Where speed/agility and skill come before strength training, and conditioning comes after that.

Looking back, I wish I would have lifted more when I was fighting Muay Thai and didnt get caught up at staying at my weight class.


#5

Very relevant question. It’s also why I edited the title from “How to be a bodybuilder and a boxer at the same time.”

Definitely lifting “only” 4 days a week will be plenty. You simply won’t recover properly trying to lift 5-6 days a week and box several days a week.

If you want to be a guy who lifts and looks good, who can also throw some good punches, that’s perfectly fine. Train like any other athlete in the weight room a few days a week (check stuff from Wendler, DeFranco, Martin Rooney, Dan John, or Chad Waterbury) and hit the boxing gym to drill technique and sport-specific conditioning (more like rounds on pads and bags, not necessarily roadwork or jump rope).


#6

If you are learning a new skill, it is better to do so with fresh muscles, so you’ll want to time your weight lifting sessions for after the boxing sessions. And boxing is very calorie intensive. I lost twenty pounds when I boxed for a semester (the classes were a hour and a half long).