How to Add 30kilos to My Snatch in 6 Months?

Hi, Im 19 5’11, 72.5 kilos and ive only been training for roughly 5-6 months seriously and just recently started to take olympic weightlifting alot more serious. My current Snatch is 72.5kilos and my Clean and Jerk is 94 kilos, My goal is to have a 100kilo snatch and 120 kilo C and J in 6 months, is there any advice on what I can do to get there?

What cycle do you plan on going on?

Unless you have a lot of excess strength in the tank that would be one hell of an improvement in 6 months, the difference between snatching 72.5 and 100 is HUGE. If you work really hard and pack on a lot of extra bodyweight I’m not saying it’s impossible, but it would be pretty damn impressive

well I plan on lifting twice a day for 4 days and one day just once it will mostly always be above 80% and every week I will try and add 5 pounds to each lift, along with that I will have steady strength accessory exercises to try and get stronger/bigger

for example Monday Snatch 2x2 85% 2x1 90% Clean and Jerk same percentages Front Squat 2x2 @ 85
afternoon Power Snatch 90% 3x1 Split Jerk 2x1 @ 90% Front Squat 3x1 @ 90

        Tuesday Power Snatch until a heavy single, usually stop at 90-95@ clean for heavy single, Front squat heavy single      afternoon 5x5 Bench, 4x6-8 rows etc.... on to other days, I'll only do strength work 2, maybe 3 times a week, such as pushpress and rows etc..

I really really want this lift to happen in 6 months

I’ll echo what Oxman said. From experience one can make rapid gains in the snatch until they reach a bodyweight snatch. Once they reach bodyweight then gains become much slower because at that point you really have to work hard on perfecting small details.

That is one of the problems when people start training on the olympic lifts: they are not like regular strength lifts (squats, deadlifts, bench, etc.) where fairly rapid strength gains can be achieved.

The reason is that in the olympic lifts it’s not only strength, it’s strength, technique, and speed. If one of these is lacking you cannot go up (once you are past the bodyweight snatch point).

For example (and this is just for illustration purpose):

If your strength is high enough to do 90kg in the snatch (150kg back squat and 130kg front squat),

Your technique level is high enough to allow you to snatch 80kg,

Your speed drops down when you reach 75kg in the snatch,

Then chances are that a 75kg snatch will be pretty easy, butas soon as you go above that it will be hit and miss and 80kg is something you might be able to hit once our of 3-5 attempts and it will not look good.

So in the strength lift you really only need to bring the strength in the involved muscles up and also work on technique (which is MUCH less complex than the OL) and your lift wil go up.

In OL you need to bring up strength, technique (and coordination) and speed (or capacity to maintain max speed of pull AND under the bar) even with heavier weights. If one of these is lagging your lifts will not go up significantly.

ANOTHER IMPORTANT ISSUE:

“Rushing” gains in the olympic lifts can be very detrimental. When that happens the lifter become “load focused”… if he has decent strength he might be able to add weight gradually by over-relying on strength and technique will suffer. The lifter will take bad habits that are VERY hard to correct and which will drastically limit their future gains.

Really, the first 8-12 months on doing the OL seriously should be invested on technique, precision and speed (especially speed under the bar). 95% of the people who start on the OL do not do this, they are not patient enough and as a result everyone of them end up being drastically limited in their progress.

On the other hand, if you really focus on building speed and precision on the competition lifts, sticking to weights that can be doner perfectly, you will find that you will actually have to start increasing the weight because they become too light. But do not rush it.

Focus on precision and speed. Get brutally strong on basic strenght lifts: back squat, front squat, push press, clean-style and snatch-style deadlifts (deadlifts that mimick the EXACT positions used in the first pull, not a powerlifting deadlift) and also use exercises to strengthen the muscles that are important in OL performance (weighted back extension, glute-ham raise, reverse hyper, romanian deadlifts, etc.).

Finally do a lot of jumping and weighted jumps to build explosiveness. Right now is the time to work on building a solid foundation in technique, speed, strength and explosiveness. Only when those are all of a very high level should you start to focus on maxing on the OL.

What Thibaudeau said haha

Seriously though, I can relate to what CT says about rushing the gains in OL. I wish I had spent more time performing technique reps with lower weights and higher speeds. Pushing for heavier weights than you can handle does nothing for technique in the long run and will more likely than not result in injuries.

Personally I would strive to improve my back and front squat numbers as a primary concern and let the OLs improve as your strength and technique does. Aiming to lift twice a day is kinda unnecessary at your level, it’s something to build up to.

CT: Showing how to throw down a massive, helpful post without coming across like an asshole or a pretentious douche since . . . well, ever. I’m taking notes.

Also, do you have a coach or access to a coach, or are you lifting entirely on your own? I’m guessing the latter but it’s better to ask than to assume.

mostly on my own, I practice for hours, even when home on a dowel and an empty barbell on technique, I have someone watch me but hes not a coach and i record myself

Awesome responses. A lot of knowledge being dropped

ya everything was very helpful thank you, im not going to rush anything, im going to focus a lot more on technique and make sure I do everything proper, I guess the one question left is, if say I work a lot on technique, what type of percentages or progressions in weight should I be making. should I still be adding more weight progressively and if so how often? should I go based on how I feel?

[quote]ofreak wrote:
ya everything was very helpful thank you, im not going to rush anything, im going to focus a lot more on technique and make sure I do everything proper, I guess the one question left is, if say I work a lot on technique, what type of percentages or progressions in weight should I be making. should I still be adding more weight progressively and if so how often? should I go based on how I feel?[/quote]

Hmm. Definitely an involved question. I would say first and foremost only go up to the max that you can do PERFECTLY on a regular basis. If you focus too much on % increases or progressions you get close to running into the exact “load focused” problem that CT talked about. That said, obviously you want to improve month to month. I would use “technical failure” as the boundary pretty much 95% of the time–thats the only way you can continue to focus on hardwiring speed and precise technique. Obey motor learning laws–never end on a poorly executed rep or weight. One poor rep is much, much more damaging than one perfect rep is constructive. The body remembers best what was done last.

I’d say, and this is just me personally, but I would say you can focus on pushing hard on the overhead squat strength up. It solidifies your catch position some, and a strong OH squat allows you to not feel like you are going to get crushed at the bottom of a snatch. Focus on olympic techniqie and speed under the bar. When you build a mean OH squat your strength will be enough to easily handle improvements in precise technique and speed as they come–slowly haha.