T Nation

How Often Do You Increase Weight?


#21

[quote]B.L.U. Ninja wrote:
I ramp up the weights on the squat and deadlift only. 10 lbs each set.[/quote]

Way to misunderstand the question, and not read the thread.


#22

You should be able to increase weight every workout as a beginner, eventually you will have to progress weekly. After a while, that will stop working and a more complex program is needed.


#23

[quote]goochadamg wrote:
Tumbles wrote:
challer1 wrote:
You’re going to get a lot of sarcastic replies because it really depends on what kind of program you are running.

If you are really that new, keep adding a rep or 2 every workout, once you hit a target # of reps, drop the reps back down and bump up the weight, repeat forever

I personally feel it should go the other way around… I can usually add incremental weight a lot more consistently than adding reps.

Very very true, unless you’re using little weight. A typical argument used to show this is to calculate the the total volume of both progressions and show that adding 5 lbs per rep results in less total volume.

Imagine you lift 200 lbs for 5 reps:

200x5 = 1000 total volume

If you next do 6 reps:

200x6 = 1200 total volume

If instead you add 5 lbs:

205x5 = 1025 total volume

So, adding 5 lbs actually result in less increase in volume than adding a rep. Therefor it’s easier. Uh, I don’t really like this argument, and if it convinces you, great. If not, there’s another more convincing one, IMHO.

Imagine you lift 300 lbs for 5 reps, according to http://www.exrx.net/Calculators/OneRepMax.html (1RM Calculator):

300x5 = ~338 1RM

If you next do 6 reps:

300x6 = ~348 1RM

If you add 5 lbs instead:

305x5 = ~343 1RM

So, adding another rep is like adding 10 lbs to your 1RM. Adding 5 lbs per rep is like adding 5 lbs to your 1RM. Therefor, adding 5 lbs per rep is easier than adding a rep.

Of course, the most convincing argument is experience. Can’t get 1 more rep in your chinups? Try adding 5 lbs or 2.5 lbs extra weight; I bet you’ll get it (assuming all else is decent in your training & recovery). Try it.

As far as adding weight, I typically tried to add weight every workout for the first 6 months or so. I then planned to do it every week. However, I would train less than 100% effort for a few weeks before attempting PR’s. I now don’t attempt that, exactly, but instead mostly expect adding 5-10 lbs a month (2.5 years training); but it’s not quite that simple, the progression in Wendlers 5/3/1 program is a bit more subtle than that. :slight_smile:
[/quote]

The problem is you are under the assumption that volume is the only variable of interest and intensity is a non-factor.

Of course if you are running with 5/3/1, your main lift is going to change in weight on a weekly basis. However, this was a beginner question, and newbies need volume.


#24

[quote]challer1 wrote:
The problem is you are under the assumption that volume is the only variable of interest and intensity is a non-factor.
[/quote]

I don’t understand. Problem with what? Could you elaborate?

[quote]challer1 wrote:
Of course if you are running with 5/3/1, your main lift is going to change in weight on a weekly basis. However, this was a beginner question, and newbies need volume. [/quote]

Yes, with 5/3/1, I am going to change weight on a weekly basis; that’s where the subtle progression comes into play. I also noted that this is something I’ve done after 2 years of training. I did state that in the beginning I tried to add weight every workout.

What does this have to do with “newbies needing (sic) volume” anyway? He was asking how often people increase weight.

Really, the only reason I chimed in on this thread was mostly to comment on how progressing with weight is easier than progressing with reps.


#25

[quote]JaX Un wrote:
whenever i can get a solid 5 reps i will increase weight[/quote]

x2

I assume by solid you’re implying with good form & bar speed. It’s important not to rush this if your form is faltering - you’re just asking for an injury that way - but don’t be chickenshit about adding weight, either. If you’re brand spanky then 5 - 10lbs added per workout will sufficiently stress your muscles and you’ll grow in response. If you’ve got some experience, try microloading (i.e. < 5lbs per workout) until you’re stuck. Then rethink your strategy.


#26

[quote]challer1 wrote:
You’re going to get a lot of sarcastic replies because it really depends on what kind of program you are running.

If you are really that new, keep adding a rep or 2 every workout, once you hit a target # of reps, drop the reps back down and bump up the weight, repeat forever[/quote]

X2