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How Much Should I Charge PT Clients?


#1

I met a friend who's in fairly average shape and he's training fatties and making tons of money. I was surprised to know how many people don't know some of basic principles of fitness. I guess when you're not as obsessed as folks on this site are about fitness you'd be clueless. I'm not certified by any means although imo wtf is the point? I'll be putting ads up at my uni gym and I know i'll likely get someone to bite. I don't plan on ripping people off rather enlighten them enough for them to reach their goals. Anyways what seems like a decent price? I'm not trying to make a living off this just some money on the side.


#2

12 dollars an hour.


#3

That sounds pretty stupid. You aren’t certified and you aren’t insured. What happens if you get a client that you are working out and gets injured and blames it on you? The gym you go to is alright with you advertising personal training sessions at their gym?


#4

Don’t you have to have an accreditation to do this shit where you are from?


#5

[quote]strungoutboy21 wrote:
That sounds pretty stupid. You aren’t certified and you aren’t insured. What happens if you get a client that you are working out and gets injured and blames it on you? The gym you go to is alright with you advertising personal training sessions at their gym?[/quote]

It’s at my school gym. I didn’t think about what if someone gets injured. I’m a bit stumped, If I sell something at a yard sale and it causes injury am I at fault? Wouldn’t this be the same?


#6

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

It’s at my school gym. I didn’t think about what if someone gets injured. I’m a bit stumped, If I sell something at a yard sale and it causes injury am I at fault? Wouldn’t this be the same? [/quote]

I’m pretty sure you’d be at fault if someone got injured at your yard sale, outside of a meteor falling on some dude as he browsed your collection of clothing or some much.


#7

As far as I know, most personal trainers who work for themselves have their own liability insurance. If one say works as a trainer in 24 hour fitness I would assume the gym would cover anything that happens under their insurance. My guess is that your school would not allow you train people at their gym without them knowing.


#8

[quote]magick wrote:

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

It’s at my school gym. I didn’t think about what if someone gets injured. I’m a bit stumped, If I sell something at a yard sale and it causes injury am I at fault? Wouldn’t this be the same? [/quote]

I’m pretty sure you’d be at fault if someone got injured at your yard sale, outside of a meteor falling on some dude as he browsed your collection of clothing or some much.[/quote]

murica


#9

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

murica [/quote]

No, not really.

You should be expected to have some awareness of things that can go wrong and prepare for that eventuality.

It’s really no different from faulting the home leasor for not checking for fungal infections/“fungal-proofing” the house/noting that they’re not responsible for fungal infections that they’re unaware of in contracts/etc.

So if someone got injured at your yard sale because of your neglect, then you’re at fault. If a meteor dropped on their head, then it’s not your fault. Because you couldn’t reasonably anticipate such a thing occurring.

Getting a client injured is almost certainly going to be something due to your neglect, and any decent lawyer will rip you a new one if someone does get injured under your supervision.


#10

[quote]magick wrote:

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

murica [/quote]

No, not really.

You should be expected to have some awareness of things that can go wrong and prepare for that eventuality.

It’s really no different from faulting the home leasor for not checking for fungal infections/“fungal-proofing” the house/noting that they’re not responsible for fungal infections that they’re unaware of in contracts/etc.

So if someone got injured at your yard sale because of your neglect, then you’re at fault. If a meteor dropped on their head, then it’s not your fault. Because you couldn’t reasonably anticipate such a thing occurring.

Getting a client injured is almost certainly going to be something due to your neglect, and any decent lawyer will rip you a new one if someone does get injured under your supervision.[/quote]

Lol wut? You never understood my yard sale analogy. If I sell someone a lawnmower ‘as is’ then i’m at no fault if the lawnmower blows up.


#11

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

Lol wut? You never understood my yard sale analogy. If I sell someone a lawnmower ‘as is’ then i’m at no fault if the lawnmower blows up.
[/quote]

Uh, this is like saying a car dealer or manufacturers aren’t at fault for selling faulty cars.

Again, if you state outright that you’re not responsible for whatever happens with your lawnmower and the buyer agrees, then fine. Otherwise, you’d be in trouble if the thing blew up.


#12

[quote]magick wrote:

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

Lol wut? You never understood my yard sale analogy. If I sell someone a lawnmower ‘as is’ then i’m at no fault if the lawnmower blows up.
[/quote]

Uh, this is like saying a car dealer or manufacturers aren’t at fault for selling faulty cars.

Again, if you state outright that you’re not responsible for whatever happens with your lawnmower and the buyer agrees, then fine. Otherwise, you’d be in trouble if the thing blew up.[/quote]

I don’t think you know what buying ‘as is’ means


#13

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

I don’t think you know what buying ‘as is’ means [/quote]

Na, I’m just really annoyed that I can’t fall asleep for some reason and am just fucking with you out of sheer boredom.

On-topic- Charge whatever you think is worth your time. I’m guessing you look the part of a lifter, so convincing people to believe you probably won’t be too hard.

And seeing as how trainers seem to charge fucking exorbitant prices for what seems to be absolutely no change whatsoever in the part of their clients, I’d imagine you could make a good bit of business if you charged half of what they do.


#14

There are endless horror stories around this, none of which can be defended by your lawnmower analogy.

Even if you believe that you are the head honcho exercise guy, with supremo communication skills, there are countless assclowms who will sue you for looking at them crookedly and if you have no way to pay for a lawyer and the best you have is a lawnmower… You’re still gonna lose and be liable.

[quote]strungoutboy21 wrote:
As far as I know, most personal trainers who work for themselves have their own liability insurance. If one say works as a trainer in 24 hour fitness I would assume the gym would cover anything that happens under their insurance. My guess is that your school would not allow you train people at their gym without them knowing.[/quote]

Who will insure someone who isn’t qualified?


#15

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

[quote]magick wrote:

[quote]Justliftbrah wrote:

Lol wut? You never understood my yard sale analogy. If I sell someone a lawnmower ‘as is’ then i’m at no fault if the lawnmower blows up.
[/quote]

Uh, this is like saying a car dealer or manufacturers aren’t at fault for selling faulty cars.

Again, if you state outright that you’re not responsible for whatever happens with your lawnmower and the buyer agrees, then fine. Otherwise, you’d be in trouble if the thing blew up.[/quote]

I don’t think you know what buying ‘as is’ means [/quote]

Out of curiosity, how would you phrase your advice to absolve you of any responsibility? “I recommend you do XYZ, but I’m not responsible if things go wrong or if it doesn’t work” doesn’t exactly strike me as a good sales pitch.


#16

get a certification before you start charging for PT. Trust me. It’ll make your life a lot easier.


#17

You would absolutely be liable for someone getting injured by following your “professional” advice or under your watch at the gym.


#18

The reason gyms won’t let you train people under their roof is because THEY don’t want to be sued if you injure someone. Universities are pretty protective of safety and their “brand” and tend to have highly qualified people working for them.


#19
  1. Get Certification, preferrably ACSM
  2. Get Liability Insurance
  3. Get Clients
  4. Get Results
  5. Charge Whatever you want >$16/hr

or…

  1. Get Clients
  2. Get Clients injured
  3. Get Sued
  4. Have Financial Court judgement hanging
    on you for 20+ years.

Your call.


#20

[quote]Axel44 wrote:

  1. Get Certification, preferrably ACSM
  2. Get Liability Insurance
  3. Get Clients
  4. Get Results
  5. Charge Whatever you want >$16/hr

or…

  1. Get Clients
  2. Get Clients injured
  3. Get Sued
  4. Have Financial Court judgement hanging
    on you for 20+ years.

Your call.

[/quote]

Screw it, lets go with door #2.