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How Much Increase Per Week?


#1

In The Men's Health Home Workout Bible, it is stated that one should not try to increase more than 10% per week as muscles can grow that fast, but supportive tissue can't. Thus, attempting more than 10% growth per week can really increase the chance of injury.

Can anyone provide more detail, such as:

1) What about women. Is it the same?
2) Clearly one can grow quicker as a beginner... One would not expect to squat 600 pounds one week, and 660 the next, and 726 the next, etc. So once a person has a solid foundation, how much growth should they shoot for each week?

Thanks!


#2

I'd try Mens Health

They might know the answer...

Just throwing that out there


#3

If you eat and rest you don't have to worry about it.


#4

Personally i pyramid. so i try up the reps of the last set each week and when it gets to a certain number i up the weight.

e.g.

60kg x 12 reps
70kg x 10
80kg x 8
90kg x 6

A lot of articles are bull, people are trying to write something new or tell you what you want to hear!


#5

More weight doesn't mean you grow more neccesarily; however, more weight is always good. You should be increasing intensity every week, whether its more weight, more reps, or less rest...in short more intensity. If you aren't increasing any of those within 2 weeks, sometihn is off, most likely diet or rest.


#6

to answer the first question i dont think it matters whether your a man or woman, either you can lift "x" weight or you can't. Dont get hung up on some number. No two people are the same so to try to pin one number on any two people is crazy.

the second question is hard to answer. You should shoot for any growth you get. The point of lifting is to grow/get stronger/etc... so you should shoot to grow every week and there is no set number/percent. If you dont eat enough or dont sleep enough you might not grow that week. All you can do is stick to the basics (sleep/nutrition) and lift consistenly while progressing and you will grow


#7

Actually I think it's more along the lines of 9.793% for women for lower body lifts and 9.638% for upper body lifts.

Seriously tho, just try to do 1 more rep or 5 more lbs the next week


#8

This is one of those questions that answers itself. I mean really. Just take out a calculator. If the body was really capable of increasing its weightlifting capacity by 10 percent each week, then a lifter would go from a 225 bench press to about 365 in 5 weeks and almost 600 in another 5 weeks. Unless you just started lifting last week, and your numbers are extremely low to begin with, 10 percent per week is silly, and quite frankly, an article that says you should not increase your weights by MORE than 10 percent per week is about as useful as wet toilet paper.

Your body will tell you exactly how much its capable of increasing on a weekly basis. You can maximize that amount by eating good and plenty food, and getting good and plenty rest. It might be 15 percent one week, 10 percent another week, (this is only likely if you are just starting out) and then 5,4,3,2 percent for weeks on end. Keep in mind, you want to make progress each time, but increasing weight is not the only way, same weight for the same amount of reps in less time is progress, same weight more reps is progress, etc.

Pick your routine. Lets say youre going to go for a 5x5 scheme. Choose a starting weight that you feel will be very challenging and maybe even not possible to finish 5x5 with. For instance, in the bench press, if you grind out 5 reps, 5 reps, 5 reps, 4 reps, 3 reps, you did a pretty good job picking a weight. Stay with that same weight until you get 5 sets of 5, it might take you one week (if youre eating and resting properly), it might take you 2 weeks. If you are doing that, you will quickly see that weight increases of 5 percent every COUPLE of weeks is more realistic over the long term.

And as you get more and more advanced, 5 percent every couple weeks will be increasingly difficult. But your body will answer that for you. Just make sure youre eating, resting, and working your ass off every time.


#9

haha that gave me a laugh while i watch oregon play horrible football


#10

so what's the problem with increasing as much as you can? to do it good and to do it as heavy as U can, that's the point...

and yeah, men's health should know answer for this shit. It is not our problem what they wrote.


#11

Increasing as much as you can IS the point, nobody said it wasnt. The question never was, should i increase as much as i can? The question is, how much should someone expect to reasonably increase every week if he is increasing as much as he can? And the answer is what I wrote above.

It doesn't matter where he read it, he can try to get information from wherever he wants, if he wants to ask here about something he read somewhere else, then at least he knows where to go to get the real answers.


#12

My post wasn't personally to U, it was just to OP because he complicate things to much. I agree with your post. But also remember this:

And I said that OP should fuck calculator numbers and increase as much as he can, so even more than 10% (He is beginner so he can). He will be afraid of the chance of injury and never go up with weights (that what I was thinking). Maybe someday he will read that he shouldn't increase more than 0,5% and what then? Lift heavy like shit, there is no other way.

And common men! Men's health is well known shit. Here are better articles, better threads and better everything. OP should read THAT stuff first, why even search stupid things on men's health? He waste time! Readers wanna hear that they don't need to go up with weights, because it's easier for them, so authors wrote shit like that. This is Men's health tactic for pussys.

So VealChop it was nothing personal, simple misunderstood. I agree with your first post, but I need to defend my opinion in second. That's all.


#13

My post wasn't personally to U, it was just to OP because he complicate things to much. I agree with your post. But also remember this:

OP wrote:
In The Men's Health Home Workout Bible, it is stated that one should not try to increase more than 10% per week as muscles can grow that fast, but supportive tissue can't. Thus, attempting more than 10% growth per week can really increase the chance of injury.

And I said that OP should fuck calculator numbers and increase as much as he can, so even more than 10% (He is beginner so he can). He will be afraid of the chance of injury and never go up with weights (that what I was thinking). Maybe someday he will read that he shouldn't increase more than 0,5% and what then? Lift heavy like shit, there is no other way.

And common men! Men's health is well known shit. Here are better articles, better threads and better everything. OP should read THAT stuff first, why even search stupid things on men's health? He waste time! Readers wanna hear that they don't need to go up with weights, because it's easier for them, so authors wrote shit like that. This is Men's health tactic for pussys.

So VealChop it was nothing personal, simple misunderstood. I agree with your first post, but I need to defend my opinion in second. That's all.
[/quote]

Absolutely, as a beginner, a trainee might make phenomenal gains, in fact he SHOULD be making phenomenal gains, and taking advantage of that time. If he is not making big gains, he is probsbly doing something wrong. And you are absolutely right, if he is holding back his gains for fear of injury, that would be slowing down his progress, unless of course, he stays injury free by doing so. Injuries will set you back much further than slow progress ever will. In my years of training, I have always left a little something in the tank for next time, and in so doing, have made consistent gains every week, and usually stayed injury free over 25 years. That keeps training interesting, fun, and consistent!!! which is important too.

Dont hold back your gains if your body is telling you it is ready to go for more, but also, be smart, and you will be training for decades!

Mens Health is garbage, the sooner people know that the better, which is why we should be doing better to answer their questions here, rather than tell them to go back there looking for answers. Once people find sites like this one, they figure out how much bad information they have been getting elsewhere.


#14

that's OK.


#15

If you were to conquer a 10% increase in weight per week, the feats you would accomplish.......

It's not terrible advice though... I think the take home message is not to get over zealous in the weight room, because ego will end you, your shoulders, your back, your lifting pleasure.

I like how you mentioned a "solid foundation"

Once you've established yourself fit to lift, concerning satisfactory ROM throughout your kinetic chain, you should absolutely go by feel.

Don't focus at all in increasing weight on the bar just yet in the beginning. Do your benches, dips, plyo push ups, rack presses, etc. Return to the bench 2 or 3 weeks later. Try benching the weight you used last time. Gauge, for yourself, the difference you feel. If you feel strong that day, add something on there and try performing the same template as you did the prior weeks. It's tedious trying to record each and every increase in all the exercises that you do. No one's stopping you from doing that, but to each its own.

Note*
Just make sure you're using enough weight to start with.


#16

I'm not sure how you would put more than a 10% increase on the bar. I mean, even if you're weak, that's a pretty big jump. I guess it's possible to want to do more at the VERY beginning.


#17

a pound is pretty solid, G


#18

I've averaged 10% per week over the last 2 months... I'm going to just keep shooting for that until it stops working. But yes... I am definitely at the very beginning.

My wife has done even better. I remember only 2 months ago, she would really try a 10 pound squat but would fail and I'd have to grab the bar and help her up. But I think she's up to 70 pounds now.

We log our progress in Excel, so can make graphs really easy... Here's how we've been doing. (This is on a relative scale, so even though I'm lifting more, my wife's line goes up faster because she has grown more.)

EDIT: Actually I don't count the 350 anymore, as it was done with a curl bar which is much easier to hold onto... 325 is my best with a regular Olympic bar.


#19

I really don't know what is going on in that graph. Anyway, yes, I believe that your wife could improve her squat from 10 to 12 pounds in just one session. Also, you said you have been increasing your deadlift by 10%. First of all, deadlift would be the easiest. Second, you said 10%, and not OVER 10%.


#20

Keep it up for another two months, and lets see what happens to that 10 percent average. Both you and your wife should be just about ready to break a few raw lifting national records. A 700 lb deadlift is only eight weeks away for you now!

In all seriousness, looks like you are making great progress, keep up the good work, but dont let the inevitable slowdown in weekly percentages take away from your enthusiasm. Keeping track of things from the very beginning as you are doing will be great to look back on, but IMHO, the more relevant graphs and charts will be the ones you are plotting when you are less of a beginner. Remember, weight increases are not the only parameters to think about. All the other measures of progress will become much more important to you the more your weekly weight percentages slow down.

Sometimes a person can hardly squat with their own bodyweight. Its just as much a function of coordination as it is strength, and as a beginner, probably much more coordination and muscle control / mobility than strength. I've seen people who can't squat their own bodyweight one week squat 135 the very next. Im sure some of it was due to strength gains, but im sure most of it was just learning the movement. Same with the deadlift. Keep it up, the bigger tests are just around the corner.