T Nation

How Much Fish/Flax A Day?

I’m currently bulking and I recently started taking both fish and flax oil caps. The flax (NOW brand) reccomends 2 softgels, 2-3 times daily, prefferably with meals. A serving size is 3, and it contains 25 cals, 3g of fat and 3g of Organic Flax Oil (Seed) and 1.5g of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. The fish oil (Optimum Nutrition) reccomends 1-2 daily with meals. 1 softgel is a serving, 10 cals, 1g total fat, 1000mg of fish oil, 180mg of epa, and 120mg of dha.

I’m bulking and eating everything in sight, how much should I take of this stuff?

Infinity for your next time around with oil I would HIGHLY suggest buying Udo’s Oil Blend. It will remove all the guess work from how much, when and the likes. Its the best oil blend out there. It gives you all the oils you need. No need to buy two, three or four different oils.

Doesn’t Udo’s contain soy?

I read an article on Berardi’s site were he says to take 6-12g of combined EPA and DHA a day. I have 1200mg fish oil caps and 1000mg flax oil caps, and I take 8 caps of each a day.

Judecca, Udo’s Choice has lecithin which is made from soy. Lecithin is not to be confused with soy, though, or soy’s negatives.

Lecithin, unlike soy, has a host of health benefits, primarily nervous system and circulatory. It is needed by every cell in the body and is a key building block of cell membranes. Without it, they would harden.

Enjoy your Udo’s!!! (grin)

Chris, there’s one more calculation you need to do. See how much EPA and DHA is in each capsule (or in each serving). Then multiply that by the number of capsules it’s going to take to hit the number you want.

Honestly, if you’re getting some flaxseed oil, you should be fine with 3-6g of EPA/DHA per day.

If it’s made from soy, why are the negative effects of it negated?

Judecca, start reading up on phytoestrogens. That’s the constituent of soy that (some) people feel is problematic. Lecithin doesn’t have any.

I have started reading up on them, otherwise there wouldn’t be a question. I read Shugart’s Poison Protein article, and that’s what has me worried.

I’m not trying to challenge you or anything dude, I’m just struggling to try to understand dietary science. The help of someone with more knowledge than myself is what I’m seeking :slight_smile:

You said soy lecithin does not have the constituent that makes soy potentially problematic. Why? Does the process of creating soy lecithin from soy deactivate the phytoestrogens?

Terry:

Why are there articles that state to much Alpha Lipoic Acid, which is found abundantly in Flax Seed Oil, can damage the prostate, and cause other medical problems?

ZEB, Udo Erasmus wrote an article that might answer some of your questions.

http://www.udoerasmus.com/articles/udo/flax_prostate.htm

BTW, ALA stands for Alpha Lipoic Acid and Alpha-Linoleic Acid. (grin)

Judecca, I’m sorry, but I just don’t know how to answer your question. I’m not holding out on you; I just don’t know how to explain it more clearly.

Phytoestrogens are plant estrogens. Plant estrogens are weak estrogen mimickers; they bind weakly to the estrogen receptors. T loving men want to keep T high and E low. Phytoestrogens seem to work against that goal, in that they elicit a hormonal response. High T and low E is not always good, which is why phytoestrogens are used therapeutically in the treatment of some hormonal cancers, like prostate cancer.

So the bottom line is that phytoestrogens can be good/useful in some cases, but are generally avoided by most of the people on this site who have read up on the topic of soy.

As far as lecithin goes, once again, I’m sorry. I can’t explain how it’s processed and how the phytoestrogens are removed. You’ll probably have to ask a manufacturer of lecithin or a food chemist/scientist.

[quote]Judecca wrote:
I have started reading up on them, otherwise there wouldn’t be a question. I read Shugart’s Poison Protein article, and that’s what has me worried.

I’m not trying to challenge you or anything dude, I’m just struggling to try to understand dietary science. The help of someone with more knowledge than myself is what I’m seeking :slight_smile:

You said soy lecithin does not have the constituent that makes soy potentially problematic. Why? Does the process of creating soy lecithin from soy deactivate the phytoestrogens?[/quote]

What Terry is saying is that the lecithin does not contain any phytoestrogens, which are the components of soy that make it undesirable. People with lactose intolerance don’t have a problem eating whey or casein, even though they both come from milk. Why? Because they’re an entirely separate constituent of the milk. They contain no lactose themselves. Same principle. (Or, at least, that’s what Terry is saying. I, personally, am not as knowledgeable as s/he.)

Thanks for the help, Chris. You did a nice of explaining that!

Yeah, though it has been answered, I’ll take a slice at it as well, because it is an important misconception that a lot of people have.

It isn’t the generic “soy” itself that is the problem, much like it isn’t “milk” itself that is the problem. There are certain constituents of soy or milk that may represent issues for some people.

In particular, I believe it is the soy proteins that are a problem. Products that exclude or extract the “harmful” constituents can indeed be very healthy or beneficial.

So yes, components of soy have phytoestrogenic properties. As Tampa-Terry has stated though, you won’t have to worry about getting those components from a reputable supplement such as Udo’s Choice oil.

Okay, I understand. I appreciate all the time you guys have taken to help me out.

One more thought though. How do you guys know there are no phytoestrogens in the soy lecithin in Udo’s? i.e. Can you provide evidence?

Terry thanks for the link. Looks like ole’ Udo put on a few pounds since the last time I saw a photo of him. He looks like he has been consuming more than oils…LOL