T Nation

How Much Does Processing Matter?

How much does the processing really effect the overall insulin response to the following:

Plain instant oats vs. old fashioned oats vs. steel cut oats?

Long-grain vs. short-grain brown rice?

We all just read that toasting and freezing bread improves the insulin response to eating it, so I might not be too surprised if the above does indeed make a difference.

supposedly, the smaller the grain/oat, the quicker the digestion. This makes it higher on the glycemic index.

However, we rarely eat any of our carbs alone and usually accompany them with at least protein. This will always lower the G.I of a meal. This might make thinking about any of this completely useless.

[quote]elusive wrote:
However, we rarely eat any of our carbs alone and usually accompany them with at least protein. This will always lower the G.I of a meal. [/quote]

Protein and/or fat do not always decrease the GI/II of a carbohydrate feeding.

Frankly, the effects of food combinations isn’t as simple or as well understood as most would think.

Here is an example of what ChrisKing is talking about:

http://www.mendosa.com/insulin_index.htm

and the study the data is from:

and here is the GI/GL list:

http://mendosa.com/gilists.htm

The data rows 386-411 clearly show that smaller pieces have a higher GI, as does instant.

There is still benefit from the slower release, regardless how other food components affect it. If one is looking to minimize insulin exposure with carbs, it makes no sense not to optimize carb sources simply because something else slows its absorption or adds to insulin release. There is still a benefit realized from a lower blood sugar level while that insulin is floating around.

Excellent replies, I figured as much. I’ve been going through the trouble of cooking slow oats, and going out of my way (and paying more) to buy long-grain brown rice for so many years now that I kinda forgot why I was doing it.

As always with non-workout nutrition; the more natural the better.

Thanks!