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How Many Sets Per Mobility Drill?


#1

hey guys,

I'm doing some mobility drills before the workout and also on non-training days.

And I'm just wondering how many sets you should do for example the ankle mobility drill?

I read everything between one set and five sets, but the most time I read "just do the exercises".

Does more help more?

(After the training I do static stretching 3 sets â 20 seconds per muscle, just if this could be important for the answer.)

thanks in regards,

Yours Tommy :slight_smile:


#2

Hi Tommy, Im glad you asked this question.
I like to do 2 sets of 10-12 reps of a exercise, each side. For example 10 leg swings each leg, done twice.
You should also take into account how your body feels. On a cold day, or a stiff day, you may need to add an extra set to get your body temp/mobiity going.
Also, I hope you are foam rolling aswell??
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#3

cool, thanks.

A special question I have is to the ankle mobility drill from the "essential 8" by Mike Boyle, where you rock your knee in the direction of the wall.

Boyle says move the knee 5 times to the middel toe, 5 times to the big and 5 times to the small toe.
these equals 15 repetitions.

on stronglifts.com i read you should move your knee 10 in every direction daily, equals 30 reps.
stronglifts also say do 1-2 sets daily.

Are the 15 reps by boyle done 1-2 times daily also enough, or should you here do more sets?
(Boyle says nothing about sets and how often you should perform it)

thanks in advance, Tommy

PS: I don't foam roll, but I'm about to start it :slightly_smiling:


#4

Hmmm.
Just try it out. You will soon work out the right number of repitions needed. I wouldnt get too caught up in the exact reps and sets. There are no magic numbers. I fond 2 sets of about 10 reps is usually plenty for most drills.
Im excited about your introduction into foam rolling. I remember my first time ...oh the pain! I would start of with a foam foam roller, and then graduate to using a PVC pipe. I would also recommend a softball for the bottom of your feet and gluteus.
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#5

The stronglifts advice is for someone with no mobility, whether it be from surgery or from muscular ligament tightness. This is an agressive program to regain movement in a joint which has lost virtually all of it.

Mike Boyles advice is for movement prep, this rep scheme will warm up the muscles and ligaments through their ROM, increase it gradually and help protect from injury. If you are doing this as a warmup follow Boyles advice. If you want a little bit more mobility you can also do it at other times, but for the calves many respond to static stretching, sprints sleds etc, so it really doesnt need a whole lot of att. as long AS it's already functioning


#6

thanks a lot silverdan for your post!
I want to do it as a warm up, so I follow Boyles advice.
But i want also to achieve some more mobility.
So follow Boyles advice, but do some more sets of 15 reps over the day (I don't like doing 30 reps and bigger sets does not mean they're better and in no other drill you use so high reps
Or is needs every planar its own reps??)

Together with some statio stretching this should be fine, or doesn't it?

stay strong,
Yours Tommy


#7

Or is needs every planar its own reps??)

Not sure what you meant here. If you are looking to gain some extra mobility/flexibility throw it in wherever you want.
YOu can, do them along with static stretching later
You can also close the workout with them.
You can superset a heavy lift with a mobility ex. LIke do a set of deadlifts then a set of ankle mob. ex. in between.

\In regards to flexibility people respond differently to different stimuli. Pay attention to how static vs dynamic/mobility stretching makes you feel. You may find that one may work better than the other for you.