T Nation

How Long Should a DL Set Take?

how long should a set of deadlifts take?

Do you lift, drop, lift, drop etc.

or

lift, drop, stand up, mill about for a sec or two, lift, drop, stand up, mill about for a sec or two, etc?

yeah, yeah. . . . laugh it up. . .

get set, lift, (optionally hold), descend,(optionally release bar and stand), get set, lift, etc for as many reps as you deem appropriate.

If you’re going for reps, don’t take too long to get set for the next rep.

But there ain’t no rules about it, really.

The more work you do in a given period of time, the more hormone release you’ll get and the better your conditioning will be, up to the limit of you recovery ability.

Some start by taking a longer time to get set and then shorten that time as they progress with that weight until they are doing true reps.

It is cheating (and risky) to bounce the weight off the floor though.

Z-wick great question. I’m glad I not the only one feeling lost sometimes. Ok for us beginners it’s a great question.

Tonight I think I felt some twinges in my back when I was performing deadlifts. Does anyone have a link to a video to look at proper set-up and body position?

I too have a question, just started to deadlift two weeks ago. I only have two 45# plates plus the bar. And this weight seems a bit light but since I think I’m actually perferforming the lift wrong (I was waiting for my son to come home from college to correct me, but he’s now going elswehere for spring break) i was ok with the lighter weight. After I correct form, how can i tell what weight is appropriate, should the weight be to the point where i can barely lift the bar, or should it be a difficult lift, but one i could get my desired reps?

Thanks in advance for the advise

Search for Erc Cressey’s Mastering the Deadlift series of articles on this site. No better source.

edit: found these over on the Worried about deadlift injury thread:

Part 1
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1582703

Part 2
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1588392

Part 3
http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1607555

Work for reps if you’re not interested in the weight. The right weight is the one with which you can hit your target number of reps while maintaining form. Then you go up either in weight or reps (or both) as you get stronger.

If your target is 1 rep, that pretty much will determine what weight you can use. Same for 5,8,12 or 15 reps. The last rep should be hard, but not cause you to break form.

My opinion is that you should set, lift, reset, lift, … continue to repeat until X number of reps are completed. There should be enough time (but not more) in between reps to get your grip and take a breath or two, while the weight is sitting on the ground.

it sounds like you are a beginner in the deadlift. in your case I would
lift
lower
set
repeat

In my opinion when you start lfting heavier lbs a little bounce at the bottom is neccesary or my back will be jacked up for a week.

[quote]p-dub wrote:
In my opinion when you start lfting heavier lbs a little bounce at the bottom is neccesary or my back will be jacked up for a week.
[/quote]

That’s a good way for a beginner to fuck up his back. Yes, crossfitters bounce the barbell when doing high rep deadlifts, but for heavy deadlifts, they should be done deliberate with proper setup for each rep, dead lifted from the floor.

If your back is jacked up for a week, do them less frequently.

Stu

[quote]stuward wrote:
p-dub wrote:
In my opinion when you start lfting heavier lbs a little bounce at the bottom is neccesary or my back will be jacked up for a week.

That’s a good way for a beginner to fuck up his back. Yes, crossfitters bounce the barbell when doing high rep deadlifts, but for heavy deadlifts, they should be done deliberate with proper setup for each rep, dead lifted from the floor.

If your back is jacked up for a week, do them less frequently.

Stu[/quote]

If you read the top of my post I said
lift
lower
set
repeat

when Im lifting heavier in the 400 to 500 range for reps
I do have a slight bounce at the bottom but thats just me.
so dont try to give me advice pal.

Bounce or no bounce, rest or no rest, it doesn’t matter. What matters most is that you’re able to rep in near perfect form.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
Bounce or no bounce, rest or no rest, it doesn’t matter. What matters most is that you’re able to rep in near perfect form.[/quote]

That’s absolutely right, and P-dub, you are able to use perfect form when you bounce off the floor. Most beginners can not. I’m not trying to give you advise. I’m trying to prevent an injury.

Exactly 32.2839 seconds… j/k

In all seriousness, don’t over complicate things. Some people like to stand up between reps, some don’t. Some prefer to deload (let the bar come to a complete rest on the ground), some don’t. They all work and you will see big strong guys doing all variations of the above.

As long as you are maintaining form and are progressing in either reps or weight on a consistent basis you should be fine.

Just pick a method that you feel most comfortable doing (while also making sure that you can keep good form) and stick with that. Or, just experiment with a couple of different variations and pick the one that you like most.

Good luck.

I do a 1 X 5 on Deads, I take as long between reps as it takes for my breathing to return to normal usually less than a min.