T Nation

How Do You Become Successful?

[quote]vroom wrote:
Imen de Naars wrote:
Recipe for an unhappy life.

LOL. No, instant fulfilment and an inability to make long term plans to achieve your goals (assuming you even have any) will leave you unhappy.[/quote]

Taken to an extreme, that’s obviously true.

Ehehe, now that you have corrected your aim, it is impossible not to agree with you. But you must admit that your first post sounded a lot different, don’t you think so?

In any case, I find that the process of acquiring the skill is actually much more fulfilling than the moment I reach the goal. When I do reach the goal, I feel like the fun has gone away. But, this obviously doesn’t stop me from enjoying the process.

[quote]vroom wrote:
rrjc5488 wrote:
and you have to work your ass off to do things you enjoy, but thats some incentive to work your ass off.

This sounds pretty similar to what I was saying. Figure out what needs to be done and do it (work your ass off). You can’t just do any job you want without getting the necessary skills or resources together.

My neighbor, who happens to be someone who I find to be full of the most wisdom I’ve ever met, and is smarter way beyond his years. He told me “Find a job that you enjoy doing, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” I think this sort of negates your advice. If he’s able to do this, then he’ll be able to do what he likes, while doing what needs to be done.

The same thing again. In order to “get” that job that you enjoy doing, if it isn’t flipping burgers and McDonalds, will require skills. Perhaps a degree. Whatever. That requires getting shit you don’t like done, so that you get to do what you do want to do.

When people read your comments, they think they can just sit on their ass all day playing video games and have their dream job land in their lap. Life puts a lot of shit in your path that you have to deal with, and when you have it under control, you can start to define your own path.

Sure, some lucky people run into a situation that requires no up-front effort… and thats fine. But if you are asking about being successful, you aren’t asking about finding happiness in flipping burgers or other general unskilled tasks.[/quote]

Now I get the idea better, if this is what you mean. I think what you’re saying now is a little different than the idea you were saying in your first post. Yes, you need to work your ass off for a certain goal, but that doesnt necessarily mean you cant enjoy that. Many people enjoy college, studying, and furthering their knowledge… they’re still enjoying the efforts they put into reaching their goal of being successful.

Sleep your way to the top. Kill anyone who gets in the way :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote]Mustang50 wrote:
Gents,

Ive stumbled unto this website and found the keys to become strong via structured programs and knowledge from over seas.

However other parts of my life are still lacking therefore I’m asking for help from people on here.

I want to be successfull! I have a struggling business and I havent finished school yet at the ripe old age of 27.

I feel like i’m in a video game were I can’t get to the next leval!!!

I followed a program for weights and became successful(in the weight room).
So are there any programs for “life” that one can follow to become a success in that area as well? Websites, books you name it…

Regards,
[/quote]

Its really simple:

Decide what you want(goals)

Find someone who already has what you want and model them. From this you will be able to work out your strategy for getting where you want.

Keep changing and tweaking your strategy until you get there.

Have fun!

[quote]Dweezil wrote:
Petedacook wrote:
Study how to be rich. Read books. Go to seminars, buy get rich schemes.

This is completely correct. Except for the last two, of course.

Life is like a box of chocolates. Most of them taste like shit. Too much information, too much bad information. How long did it take you to find this site? Were you lucky? Did someone show you the error of your ways in doing machines and cardio and standing on bosu balls? Or did you realize that what you were doing was not giving you the results you wanted, and you dug until you found what you were looking for?

You can be lucky in wealth. There are levels of luck. Odds say you won’t just walk into wealth.

You should not take what I say as canon, though I’m wealthy relative to the amount of time I spend trying to be so, and you should not take what anyone else says as canon. What I’m going to do, because I have a tremendous amount of free time on my hands and I’m feeling like I should be helpful (rare), is give you recommendations that will set you on the most stable and proven path.

I can’t make you follow the path, but I can show you where it is, and maybe entice you to go down it by strategically placing small pieces of ham leading down the path into the distance.

My recommendations might be terrible, just like any recommendation you might be given. If you don’t take what I write with cynicism, then you’re fucked because you’re probably not going to do it with anyone else.

I’m also going to start with you as if you were a blank slate, incase anyone else chooses to read this drivel. You pick what applies to you, but you never skip a step if you haven’t completed it.

You need to start with a basic understanding of economics. I am horrible at math. Bad, awful, couldn’t divide my way out of a paper bag much less understand the geometry of the thing once I was inside of it. Math is not necessarily economics. Understanding economic principles does not involve an understanding of mathematics so much as an understanding of the processes and habits that drive economic theory.

Read Naked Economics: Undressing the Dismal Science first.

Wealth, wealth you build as opposed to wealth you are given, is like a really fucking tall thin ladder made out of Donald Trump’s hair. It’s not sturdy, and it smells kind of weird, and it’s probably some kind of dead animal. I guess you can eat it if you’re trapped in the wilderness and waiting for rescue.

What I mean to say is that you have to start off as sturdy as possible, because the further you go up the ladder the more relevant your beginning will become. You can float cash forever, but it won’t mean you’re rich. I drive a Corvette, a neighbor drives a Arnage. Which one of us has more money? If you guessed him, you’d be wrong. There are ways to float money you don’t have.

I’ll preface it with this important message: PAY OFF DEBT NOW (unless you’re me and you hold debt on purpose but you’re not me so don’t do what I do okay)

I probably should have left that last part out because I think it weakened the message. Oh well.

Your first step, in anything, is a 1-2 pay check cushion in your checking account. It is not even a cushion. You look at it as your minimum. You make $900 a week? Your checking account minimum just became $1200. Each time you go below that I’ll hit you in the face with a brick.

Then, a savings account. Always a online bank. You can have a discussion of a monkey market account later, CDs are always shit (I’ll argue this with anyone and they’ll lose), but you need to have liquid savings. Why? Aaaa-Congratulations! Hack Wilson just ran you over in the street in his Mercedes because he thought you were an inconsequential plebian. Do you have the emergency funds to pay for hospital treatment of your broken pelvis if you’re having an issue with your insurance?

What do you want your savings to be? You’re laid off. Hack Wilson broke your pelvis. You don’t get a job for 6 months. How much would you need to live for 6 months without an income? That’s how much needs to be in your savings account.

Your third task, if you choose to accept it, is a retirement account.

And, your second (and third, and fourth…) book.

You’re going to read The Four Pillars of Investing by Bernstein, or a Random Walk Down Wallstreet by Malkiel. Whichever you choose doesn’t matter, I prefer the Four Pillars but it’s a harder book to read. You’re going to follow up either book with Common Sense on Mutual Funds by John Bogle (don’t take all of Bogle’s book at face value, but use it to readjust your thoughts on the stock market).

From there, your employer (you own a business, I’m speaking in generalized terms) will provide you with something under most conditions, and if they offer dollar matching on that account it’s imperative you max that out. It’s free money. As to what they’re investing in for you, well, you sure as hell shouldn’t be in a money market account, and that’s all I’m saying. There are too many variables for me to get deep into it.

Since I’m going to gear this a little to my experience, I don’t have an employer sponsored retirement fund. You follow the recommendations of Bernstein towards the end of his book based on allocation for the point you’re at in your life. I have a way of doing things, but I make a fair portion of my money off of this, whereas you’re creating a base for wealth.

Yeah, you’re not rich, and I probably have you putting down $15 grand already ($4,500 into a Roth IRA by April 15th, a few thousand into your employers retirement fund, a few thousand into a savings account, a couple thousand in a checking account). You’re not wealthy. You haven’t even started on the path to being wealthy. You haven’t even poured the foundation, though I just helped you to buy it.

Might as well pour it assuming you’ve reached this point, though.

You’re going to go read the fifth edition of Investing in Real Estate, you’re going to buy Property Management for Dummies, and you’re going to read (I said read, not buy) Buying a House for Dummies. If you can’t see where I’m about to go with this then you have bigger problems than wealth. Some form of cognitive impairment. Is there a fork sticking out of your forehead? Did you jump into a pool that had been drained? Are you taking Xyience products? Do you think Britney Spears is still smokin’ hot? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, speak to a neurologist immediately.

So, uh, go get 30 grand and buy a house. While continuing to contribute the maximum to your IRA and your work retirement fund. Already have a house? Buy a second one. It’s what I was going to have you do after you bought your first, anyway.

Why? Why. Why, why. Why would you buy a second house when you already own one? You’re not a real estate investor, you don’t even necessarily want to be a real estate investor. Why? Because you’re going to make money off rent for 30 years to supplement your income. And by the time you’re about to retire, you’re going to have an additional $150,000 of equity in that house and you can refinance and continue to rent it or sell it. Helpful, no?

From there? I don’t know. You sure as hell better, though. You’ve got two houses and upwards of what- 30, 40 grand in retirement accounts? Better not fuck that up, you know?

Do what you want, because you’re going to be informed by the time you get, in real life, to the point I’m pushing you to at the end of this post. Real estate investor? Enjoy getting sued. Constantly. Are you going to become a day or swing trader (good luck with that, princess)? I don’t know, and you won’t know until you find what you like. What you will find is that you’ll be retiring with over a million dollars and two houses, and that may be enough for you.[/quote]

Really good advice Dweezil.

To the OP,

I took a financial seminar a little over a year ago and it taught to do pretty much all of the things that you suggested doing. The creator of the Seminar, Dave Ramsey, was a millionaire in his twenties, went completely bankrupt, and then worked his way back up to being a millionaire. Not too many people can make that claim (there are others though of course).

Ramsey runs an organization designed to help everyday people overcome their financial difficulties, learn how to manage their money, and ultimately gain “financial peace”.

The one thing that he suggested that is a little different than what Dweezil suggested (and this many just be a matter of semantics) is to get your emergency fund ($1,000 suggested) before begginning to really focus on paying off your debts. The logic is that if you don’t have that cushion, then you are just asking for trouble trying to really pay off your debts.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that you shouldn’t pay your bills if you can. But, you won’t ever start saving until it becomes of very high priority. Place if first in importance until you get that $1,000 saved. Well, actually I should say place it before everything except the survival of you and your loved ones. I’m not suggesting that you not put food on the table so that you can get that emergency fund in the bank. Just that saving needs to become very, very important if you want it to work for you.

One other suggestion that I’m not sure if Dweezil already mentioned (and if he did then I apologize for not catching it) is to not borrow money for anything with the exception of a house. And even then, try to save up as much of the down payment as possible. If you can pay for it outright that’s obviously the best way to go. Also forget about credit cards, they are a terrible deal for you, and can get you into serious trouble. Use cash, checks, or even ATM/Debit cards instead.

I also agree with what others have said about finding your vocation. A vocation and a job aren’t the same thing. A job is only done to pay the bills, and while that may be a necessity in your current situation, it should only be a stepping stone towards your goal of finding your vocation.

A vocation is your “true calling” so to speak. Basically it’s your dream job, the job that you were meant for. Basically imagine people paying you to do what you love. What could possibly be a better way to earn a living than that?

Well, anyways I hope this at least helps a little.

Good training,

Sentoguy

Anyways, goo

[quote]Imen de Naars wrote:
Here you are confusing the source of the difference. The CEOs read more because they are smarter, and they are also CEOs because they are smarter. Both situations are correlated with the same variable.
[/quote]

CEOs aren’t necessarily “smarter,” although a lot of them think they are…

I’ll add one little thing to Dweezil’s real-estate advice:

Do not expect the rent from your property to be income-generating. Yes, it’s nice if it happens, but a lot of the time you’re going to take a loss… the rent is going to be $100, $200 less than the mortgage. Maybe more, depending on the market and how comfortable you are. Even if you break even or make a little on the rent every month, there’s a good possibility that you’re going to spend all the extra money and more on repairs and maintenance. Always factor in those costs when buying a second (or first) property. You have to have money in reserve, or a good emergency line of credit.

Being a landlord is hard work, if you aren’t a slumlord. Prepare to lose months of rent on deadbeats you have to evict. Prepare for broken appliances and clogged up toilets. Find someone who has an owner-friendly lease and adapt it to your needs, to help cover yourself. Learn how to do basic repairs and installation… you will be amazed how much you can save by learning to do a little plumbing, drywall, painting, and installation. Don’t do a shitty job on any of that stuff, and make sure you know when you’re in over your head… otherwise you’ll pay the tax for getting the original job done plus fixing all your mistakes.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
The one thing that he suggested that is a little different than what Dweezil suggested (and this many just be a matter of semantics) is to get your emergency fund ($1,000 suggested) before begginning to really focus on paying off your debts. The logic is that if you don’t have that cushion, then you are just asking for trouble trying to really pay off your debts.[/quote]

They can be done simultaneously. You have to budget, which is something I left out of my post, but is self-explanatory.

Credit cards are fine if you use them correctly (as with everything). There are multiple trains of thought in building credit, and one of the riskier (if you don’t have money saved up) is to purposely incur debt on an introductory 0% APR card, then move the balance to another introductory 0% APR card, then move the balance to another introductory 0% APR card. Always paying above the minimum balance. Paying off debt is, it is believed by almost everyone, a faster way to increase your credit score than just paying off your credit card every month.

Also, while I use cash for probably 50% of my purchases, I don’t believe in debit cards. I like that they (the majority of Visas used by major banks now) give people points who otherwise couldn’t get a rewards card, but there’s always the buffer between you and your checking account with a normal credit card. If someone wipes out your debit card, and you miss it for a day or two, chances are the charge is going to go through before it can be disputed. I don’t know if you have any idea how hard it is to get a serious amount of money back from a bank, but I can assure you from personal experience that it is extremely difficult. A credit card can be disputed because you have time to dispute the bill, and you can even take a hit to your credit score if you refuse to pay the bill and go and dispute that without losing any money directly from your savings account.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
Do not expect the rent from your property to be income-generating.[/quote]

Yes, I’d say this is generally correct, and it’s not what people are prepared for when they get into real estate.

After a period of 5 or so years though, if you’re not atleast breaking even you have a problem, unless you’re doing refi’s and taking that money to reinvest into real estate (as plenty of people, including myself, do).

As an investor I believe in putting down 25% as opposed to the generally accepted 20%, though, if only because that difference tends to get me closer to breaking even on rent sooner and gives me slightly more leverage. People don’t like it when you’re carrying millions of dollars in debt, even if you’re in real estate where it’s common. The more you have vested, the easier it’s going to be for you to get new lines of credit.

Yes, the Home Depot courses are alright for this, if they still do those (?). I was lucky enough to get involved in construction part-time when I was younger so that’s where my ability to handle shit like that came from, but it’ll definitely save you a ton of money for basic repairs. Especially dry wall and plumbing.

I want to touch on this whole ‘be happy yay!!! ^___^’ shit about having a job. Yes, you should go into a field that most interests you, but that field must be profitable. You cannot make money yelling at sporting events. You cannot make money playing videogames (unless you’re an ugly white male between the ages of 18-25). You cannot make money furiously masturbating to photos of women in a Macy’s catalogue. You’ll get thrown out of the store if you do it in the women’s underwear area also I have experienced.

There is a difference between doing something you enjoy and doing something that makes you money. The more you do something you enjoy, the more you see the horrible side of what you once loved, the sicker you become of it, and it ruins what was something enjoyable for you. Things you enjoy should be hobbies, or some job you only do part-time. This whole ideal of being super happy and loving what you do every day so you’ll be better at it started with these moronic self help people who were complete failures in business and are applying principles that sound nice to people to make money of their own. If you do what you love, you will no longer love it.

[quote]elliotnewman1 wrote:
Its really simple:

Decide what you want(goals)

Find someone who already has what you want and model them.
[/quote]

This is GREAT advice.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
CEOs aren’t necessarily “smarter,” although a lot of them think they are…
[/quote]

Agreed.

Intelligence has little to do with becoming a CEO.

CEO’s are less scrupulous, more cutthroat, and better connected than their rivals.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
I’ll add one little thing to Dweezil’s real-estate advice:

Do not expect the rent from your property to be income-generating. Yes, it’s nice if it happens, but a lot of the time you’re going to take a loss… the rent is going to be $100, $200 less than the mortgage. Maybe more, depending on the market and how comfortable you are. Even if you break even or make a little on the rent every month, there’s a good possibility that you’re going to spend all the extra money and more on repairs and maintenance. Always factor in those costs when buying a second (or first) property. You have to have money in reserve, or a good emergency line of credit.

Being a landlord is hard work, if you aren’t a slumlord. Prepare to lose months of rent on deadbeats you have to evict. Prepare for broken appliances and clogged up toilets. Find someone who has an owner-friendly lease and adapt it to your needs, to help cover yourself. Learn how to do basic repairs and installation… you will be amazed how much you can save by learning to do a little plumbing, drywall, painting, and installation. Don’t do a shitty job on any of that stuff, and make sure you know when you’re in over your head… otherwise you’ll pay the tax for getting the original job done plus fixing all your mistakes.[/quote]

Appreciate your input here Nephorm, I have several friends who swear that rental properties will bring them easy “mailbox” money. Somehow
I can’t picture it being that easy.

I went through a police academy 10 or so years ago and we studied civil process for several days. The eviction process sounded like a nightmare.

I’ve noticed that to rent a house/garage apartment in my neighborhood the upfront deposit is about equal to a month’s rent, compared to a couple of hundred for a big apartment complex.

I think it’s interesting and I’d like to see it continue.
I’ll throw out a few book suggestions:

  1. The only investment guide you’ll ever need (updates every few years) by Andrew Tobias
  2. My vast fortune by Andrew Tobias
  3. Millionaire Next Door
  4. Die Broke by Stephan Pollan

[quote]Dweezil wrote:
People skills? You’ve got them, or you don’t. If you cannot learn to smile and be funny there’s no point studying books that will essentially tell you to do those two things. If you try to apply knowledge gleamed from sources teaching you how to influence people you’ll only come off as tremendously phony to anyone in a position of power. [/quote]

That is absolutely incorrect. You can learn people skills. You need to practice, just like public speaking. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

You can read books and improve your interpersonal skills with the information contained within them. However, it’s one of those things you’ll have to learn the concepts and apply them in your own way. This is again where the practice comes into play.

To say you have them or you don’t is absolutely ridiculous, and because of that I didn’t finish reading your post.

[quote]nephorm wrote:
Imen de Naars wrote:
Here you are confusing the source of the difference. The CEOs read more because they are smarter, and they are also CEOs because they are smarter. Both situations are correlated with the same variable.

CEOs aren’t necessarily “smarter,” although a lot of them think they are… [/quote]

Not necessarily on an individual-basis comparison, but generally averaging CEOs and averaging their dependants, I think the CEOs would come out on top.

Read Ben Stiller- How to Ruin Your Life.

You can even just listen to the iTunes one hour abridged version.

I’m not saying it will dramatically change your life, but if you can see yourself in some of these situations then you know where to start.

[quote]Imen de Naars wrote:
averaging CEOs and averaging their dependants, I think the CEOs would come out on top.
[/quote]

If the most intellingent amoung humans ran everything the world would be a much different place.

Instead we have unscrupulous, cutthroat, and well connected politicians and CEO’s.

[quote]unearth wrote:
nephorm wrote:
CEOs aren’t necessarily “smarter,” although a lot of them think they are…

Agreed.

Intelligence has little to do with becoming a CEO.

CEO’s are less scrupulous, more cutthroat, and better connected than their rivals.[/quote]

And smarter.

[quote]JokerFMJ wrote:
That is absolutely incorrect. You can learn people skills. You need to practice, just like public speaking. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

You can read books and improve your interpersonal skills with the information contained within them. However, it’s one of those things you’ll have to learn the concepts and apply them in your own way. This is again where the practice comes into play.

To say you have them or you don’t is absolutely ridiculous, and because of that I didn’t finish reading your post.[/quote]

I would say I cared that you didn’t finish reading my post, but that would probably be a lie.

The majority of ‘how to influence people’ books, or anything related to NLP, makes people telegraph themselves whether they know it or not to anyone who’s seen the tactics before. Can you learn how you should act? Yes, though most of the books on the subject won’t be helpful, and will become increasingly detrimental the more you use of them. If you can pick up a few things it’s fine, if you’re going to use everything in one of those books you’re going to look like a shithead.

[quote]Dweezil wrote:

They can be done simultaneously. You have to budget, which is something I left out of my post, but is self-explanatory.

Also forget about credit cards, they are a terrible deal for you, and can get you into serious trouble. Use cash, checks, or even ATM/Debit cards instead.

Credit cards are fine if you use them correctly (as with everything). There are multiple trains of thought in building credit, and one of the riskier (if you don’t have money saved up) is to purposely incur debt on an introductory 0% APR card, then move the balance to another introductory 0% APR card, then move the balance to another introductory 0% APR card. Always paying above the minimum balance. Paying off debt is, it is believed by almost everyone, a faster way to increase your credit score than just paying off your credit card every month.

Also, while I use cash for probably 50% of my purchases, I don’t believe in debit cards. I like that they (the majority of Visas used by major banks now) give people points who otherwise couldn’t get a rewards card, but there’s always the buffer between you and your checking account with a normal credit card. If someone wipes out your debit card, and you miss it for a day or two, chances are the charge is going to go through before it can be disputed. I don’t know if you have any idea how hard it is to get a serious amount of money back from a bank, but I can assure you from personal experience that it is extremely difficult. A credit card can be disputed because you have time to dispute the bill, and you can even take a hit to your credit score if you refuse to pay the bill and go and dispute that without losing any money directly from your savings account.

I want to touch on this whole ‘be happy yay!!! ^___^’ shit about having a job. Yes, you should go into a field that most interests you, but that field must be profitable. You cannot make money yelling at sporting events. You cannot make money playing videogames (unless you’re an ugly white male between the ages of 18-25). You cannot make money furiously masturbating to photos of women in a Macy’s catalogue. You’ll get thrown out of the store if you do it in the women’s underwear area also I have experienced.

There is a difference between doing something you enjoy and doing something that makes you money. The more you do something you enjoy, the more you see the horrible side of what you once loved, the sicker you become of it, and it ruins what was something enjoyable for you. Things you enjoy should be hobbies, or some job you only do part-time. This whole ideal of being super happy and loving what you do every day so you’ll be better at it started with these moronic self help people who were complete failures in business and are applying principles that sound nice to people to make money of their own. If you do what you love, you will no longer love it.[/quote]

Hi Dweezil,

Budgeting is definitely crucial, and although I think it may seem self-explanatory, it still needs to be mentioned. If you don’t allocate every cent of the money that you earn, then it will be very difficult to ever really get control of your money, which is definitely something that you want to learn to do.

As far as credit cards go, yeah, if you were super diligent and really knew what you were doing, maybe you might be able to get away with a method of continually transferring your credit card balances to other cards with 0% APR. But, you are really playing with fire by doing so. The credit card companies are multi billion dollar industries that spend billions of dollars every year trying to figure out how you can make them money. So, most likely you are just going to end up getting yourself in trouble by trying to outsmart the credit card companies. Instead, I think it’s better to just not play their game.

That is one reason why I really don’t advocate credit cards. Another is because if you don’t have the actual cash to buy something, then quite frankly you probably shouldn’t be buying it (with the exception of a house/condo). Just save up the money for it and pay cash for it.

Also, cash will allow you to bargain much more effectively than a credit card will. Cash has an emotional component that credit cards don’t. Why do you think they have you use poker chips in casinos? Because even though those chips represent certain amounts of cash, they don’t have the same emotional connection that cash does. So, people can bet them without feeling the same emotional attachment to them like they would feel if they were gambling with actual cash.

Show someone a handful (or better yet briefcase full) of hundred dollar bills, and it’s going to be much more difficult for them to turn down your offer than if you just showed them a Visa card, even though the visa card might actually represent a larger sum of money.

In regards to your comments about careers. I understand where you are coming from and I agree that you must earn enough money to support yourself and your family (if applicable).

However, I’d have to disagree with you that doing what you enjoy and doing something that makes you money are exclusive. Nor do I agree that the more you do something you enjoy the less you will enjoy doing it. If that’s the case then you might not have enjoyed doing it that much in the first place. And of course, I also realize that there is such a thing as doing anything too much, but that is a different discussion.

I think that if you asked professional athletes if playing the game they loved has made them grow to dislike it, they’d look at you as if you were crazy. The same goes of musicians, artists, and basically any other group of people who get paid to do what they love to do. These people get paid (albeit some more than others) to do what they love to do.

Personally, the more I do what I enjoy doing, the more I enjoy doing it because I get better and better at it, which makes it more and more enjoyable. So, if I can do something that I love and continually grow to love, and get paid for it, then I’d say that is a pretty sweet deal. And from what little experience I have had so far with getting paid for my vocation, it certainly hasn’t gotten any less enjoyable or satisfying as time has gone by.

Good training,

Sentoguy

[quote]CaliforniaLaw wrote:
CEO’s are less scrupulous, more cutthroat, and better connected than their rivals.

And smarter.[/quote]

If by “smarter” you mean more likely to stab a rival in the back, then yeah.

However, most politicans and CEOs have average innate intelligence levels.