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Hossein Rezazadeh Pulls Out of Olympics!

Two time gold medalist Hossein Rezazdeh has pulled out of the Olympic Games next month in Beijing at the advice of doctors due to undisclosed “stomach problems.”

Expect an exciting battle for gold in the 105+kg class!

For full story:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080723/wl_mideast_afp/oly2008weightliftingirirezazadeh_080723165415

-THREEWHITELIGHTS STAFF-

Sad to hear, the guy is a beast, it was probably the last chance he had at the olympics, best of luck with whatever he ends up doing after weightlifting.

Doesn’t surprise me at all. For guys like him and Mutlu they have too much to lose if they turn up and perform really badly.

3 way battle between Steiner, Chigishev and Scerbahtis now that Reza and Cholakov are out of the frame?

:frowning:

Evgeny!

Shitty to hear about Reza, but I was rooting for this guy.

[quote]matso1236 wrote:
Sad to hear, the guy is a beast, it was probably the last chance he had at the olympics, best of luck with whatever he ends up doing after weightlifting.[/quote]

That’s a bummer that high-level weightlifters are more-or-less through by their late 20s or early 30s. It’s interesting when we compare the career tracks in weightlifting to powerlifting. Some of the best deadlifters in my part of the country- Tom Eiseman, Tee Meyers, and George Herring- all have pulled at or close to 800 at under 220 of bodyweight in their late 40s and early 50s. Chuck Vogelpohl is still one of the greatest squatters around and he is in his 40s. Steve Goggins hit the first 1100 squat in his 40s.

[quote]Pinto wrote:
matso1236 wrote:
Sad to hear, the guy is a beast, it was probably the last chance he had at the olympics, best of luck with whatever he ends up doing after weightlifting.

That’s a bummer that high-level weightlifters are more-or-less through by their late 20s or early 30s. It’s interesting when we compare the career tracks in weightlifting to powerlifting. Some of the best deadlifters in my part of the country- Tom Eiseman, Tee Meyers, and George Herring- all have pulled at or close to 800 at under 220 of bodyweight in their late 40s and early 50s. Chuck Vogelpohl is still one of the greatest squatters around and he is in his 40s. Steve Goggins hit the first 1100 squat in his 40s.

[/quote]

Is it fair to say that oly lifting is more demanding on connective tissues than powerlifting?

[quote]Flow wrote:
Is it fair to say that oly lifting is more demanding on connective tissues than powerlifting?[/quote]

I don’t know if it’s the olympic lifting itself.

I’d say it’s more the high volume work is tougher. Most oly lifters do a fairly high amount of volume compared to what other lifters do.

The reason I say the volume and not the type of lifting, is that the russian powerlifters all follow high volume templates, and they also seem to peak earlier and have shorter careers.

I’d be more inclined to say that O lifters have shorter competitive careers because they as they get older they get too slow, rather than because they have career-ending injuries or anything like that.

[quote]ninearms wrote:
I’d be more inclined to say that O lifters have shorter competitive careers because they as they get older they get too slow, rather than because they have career-ending injuries or anything like that. [/quote]

I completely agree. Explosiveness and speed will almost always decline at a faster rate than overall strength.

[quote]ninearms wrote:
I’d be more inclined to say that O lifters have shorter competitive careers because they as they get older they get too slow, rather than because they have career-ending injuries or anything like that. [/quote]

That’s why I’m such a huge fan of the lifters that manage to dominate their weight classes for periods spanning nearly 16 years. Pocket Hercules, Dimas, Kakhiasvilli and Mutlu are all supermen.

Naim had a 3xBW C&J at 16!

http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1122166/1/index.htm

Ah that’s shitty news. First the Greeks, then the Bulgarians, now Rezazadeh!

I’m going to Beijing with my brother next month, and he was one of the guys I was hoping to see. At least I got to see him in Vancouver at the Worlds.

It’s good news really. The 105kg+ class is so tight at the top. Should be really exciting if the Euros are anything to go by, especially with Steiner doing 201/250 recently. A kilo could be all it takes to drop a lifter from gold to bronze.

Plus the best Greek lifter, Kourtidis, is still lifting because he didn’t get popped.

Which classes do you have tickets for?

[quote]ninearms wrote:
I’d be more inclined to say that O lifters have shorter competitive careers because they as they get older they get too slow, rather than because they have career-ending injuries or anything like that. [/quote]

excatly… its reflexes, speed, explosivness etc…

look at the olympics… how many sports have people older than 30 vs people younger than 30 in most of the sports… especially sports like WL and athletics… I havent counted… but from my view I think most of the sports require younger people…

OK, except the shooting and sports like that…

how many soccer players are there above 30, much less than below 30, and most of them hit their peak around 27, some even earlier, and much less of them later…

thing is the more dynamic the sport is, the younger people are required… the more static sport is, some older guy comes up from time to time… in totally static sports like PL and BB there are lots of over 30 fellas… who are then in their peaks…

no, it has nothing to do with volume of training, in russia lifters dont PEAK EARLY, I’m sure most of these guys could continue doing the sport longer, but either someone better shows up, and takes your place, or they just quit after they win some major thing… its not uncommon for people to win worlds when they’re 23-25 and then you wont see them ever again…

Ed Coan squatted his first 900 when he was 23 I think, and he squatted his first 1000 when he was 35 or something… those extra 100 pounds took him over a decade… same for russian guys, then can squat big numbers fast, but after that like I said…

if they would continue at thhe same level… I think most of them would achieve more…

gavra

[quote]gavra wrote:
ninearms wrote:
I’d be more inclined to say that O lifters have shorter competitive careers because they as they get older they get too slow, rather than because they have career-ending injuries or anything like that.

excatly… its reflexes, speed, explosivness etc…

look at the olympics… how many sports have people older than 30 vs people younger than 30 in most of the sports… especially sports like WL and athletics… I havent counted… but from my view I think most of the sports require younger people…

OK, except the shooting and sports like that…

how many soccer players are there above 30, much less than below 30, and most of them hit their peak around 27, some even earlier, and much less of them later…

thing is the more dynamic the sport is, the younger people are required… the more static sport is, some older guy comes up from time to time… in totally static sports like PL and BB there are lots of over 30 fellas… who are then in their peaks…

no, it has nothing to do with volume of training, in russia lifters dont PEAK EARLY, I’m sure most of these guys could continue doing the sport longer, but either someone better shows up, and takes your place, or they just quit after they win some major thing… its not uncommon for people to win worlds when they’re 23-25 and then you wont see them ever again…

Ed Coan squatted his first 900 when he was 23 I think, and he squatted his first 1000 when he was 35 or something… those extra 100 pounds took him over a decade… same for russian guys, then can squat big numbers fast, but after that like I said…

if they would continue at thhe same level… I think most of them would achieve more…

gavra

[/quote]

Well ed coan squat at 23 if thats true, his jump to 1000 could have been due to better advancement in gear. You make some great points though overall I agree mostly.

[quote]shizen wrote:
Well ed coan squat at 23 if thats true, his jump to 1000 could have been due to better advancement in gear. You make some great points though overall I agree mostly. [/quote]

nope, his 1000 was made in Inzer Z-suit in 1998 and I dont know wnich wraps he used, looks like Marathon Double Gold Line…

and Z-suit is 20+ year old material/design… so its not due to the advancement in technology, cause back in the time he was known to use old suit for few competitions… it was not like today…

maybe, BUT maybe he used frantz canvas for his 900 at 23, but consider this… ed broke his first 2400 in '92 I think at 220 bodyweight, when he pulled 901 deadlift… and he admitted that he was a lot stronger back then than in '98 when he made 2465 (his second 2400+)… just in '98 he got smarter, peaked better, upped hi BW so he avoided injuries etc.

basically he was stronger when he was younger… I also remmember an interview with him in old PLUSA from '87 where he was already squatting 900+, benching 500+, deadlifting 800+… when he said I belleive I have few more record breaking years in me…

I think he made his first 2204lb total at 198 BW (first man to do that under 200lb) in '86 or '85… you know the gear from back then… he was like 22…

and his first 2400 he made 6 years after… so it took 20 pounds of bodyweight, 6 years of training to get that extra 200lb on his total…

so, if you look at that 2204 at 22, did he peaked early?

look even now in IPF how many people does that at that BW and age…

just a numbers, to show that sports still somehow favorise younger persons… I even think that equipment prolonged active career time, strip them all naked, and till 30 most of them would either hit their peak and/or end up injured…

I gave few examples and few points to consider…

goggins squatted 1100 in his forties, but that goggins was making 800+, 881 as I remmember back in '87 or something, he was 20 something years old… and how far equipment got better since then, I doubt that older goggins is better than younger goggins…

look at the DL numbers, basically what you deadlift till 30… i dont think you’ll pull more when you’re 40 or 50… unless you really trained like shit until 30s… progress would be really low…

there are exceptions, but thing is MOST PEOPLE wont be too much stronger afterwards… if you start doing everything right from the beggining, I mean training hard and giving your best you’re going to hit numbers pretty close to your best ever within few years…

Problem is most people fuck around too much, so by the moment they realise how to do it… they already have 20 years of training under their belts, and then they think I needed all this time to get stronger…

russians… they just do what is needed to be done from beggining, good technique, best planned training, recovery techniques, bodies responds, and thats it… it has nothing to do with being russian or with vodka…

gavra

if you were living in a cave, and you dont know about anything else, but you wont to get stronger, and I put you on a sheiko routine,

would it be too hard?
would you know it is too much volume?
would you FEEL overtrained?

NOPE… NOPE… and NOPE…

you would do it, you would adapt to it… you would get strong very fast… elite lifters sometime dont have the luxury of knowing how hard they train… for them it is NORMAL…

gavra

[quote]ninearms wrote:
It’s good news really. The 105kg+ class is so tight at the top. Should be really exciting if the Euros are anything to go by, especially with Steiner doing 201/250 recently. A kilo could be all it takes to drop a lifter from gold to bronze.

Plus the best Greek lifter, Kourtidis, is still lifting because he didn’t get popped.

Which classes do you have tickets for?[/quote]

We’ve got tickets for the men’s 94, 105, and 105+, but I’m pretty hopeful that we’ll get to watch some of the lighter classes somewhere in there. But the weightlifting comes after the judo for me though…

A bit pissed at this, genuinely thought he could have gone for the 600lb c&j.

He actually retired due to a car accident that he had last summer that has left him with injuries that have not healed-mainly to his hands.