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Horizontal or Vertical ?


#1

Hey there

I'm trying to figure out if doing a front plank cable row is defined as a horizontal or vertical pulling exercise?

Thanks


#2

Are you pulling the cable from overhead or from the side?

I’m also intrigued why it matters?


#3

It’s being pulled from overhead. If i was standing up it would be a pull up or pull down motion.

One side I would describe it as a horizontal pull, since the cable is being pulled that direction looking from a standing perspective. But, for from the plank position, it’s a vertical pull.

It doesnt really matter, it just anoys me and my ocd won’t let me off the hook.


#4

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
It’s being pulled from overhead. If i was standing up it would be a pull up or pull down motion.
[/quote]

In that case it would be a vertical pull in relation to your body, in the same way that the bench press is a horizontal push in relation to your body.


#5

Thank you !


#6

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
it just anoys me and my ocd won’t let me off the hook. [/quote]
Is it terrible that my first instinct is to come up with reasons why it could actually be a horizontal pull, just to mess with your head more? :wink:

Ha, but yeah, like dagill said, “vertical” and “horizontal” are meant in relation to your torso, not the actual ground-level. So it is basically a variation of a pulldown-ish movement. You could always switch it up and do a side plank row, which would be a “horizontal” movement if you faced the cable, but you’re doing fine as-is.


#7

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
it just anoys me and my ocd won’t let me off the hook. [/quote]
Is it terrible that my first instinct is to come up with reasons why it could actually be a horizontal pull, just to mess with your head more? :wink:
[/quote]

My first instinct was to try and justify it as neither, since the ‘pulling’ component is almost inconsequential compared to the stability element.


#8

[quote]dagill2 wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
it just anoys me and my ocd won’t let me off the hook. [/quote]
Is it terrible that my first instinct is to come up with reasons why it could actually be a horizontal pull, just to mess with your head more? :wink:
[/quote]

My first instinct was to try and justify it as neither, since the ‘pulling’ component is almost inconsequential compared to the stability element.[/quote]

your first instinct was correct. I’m surprised a bosu ball isn’t involved in this nonsense.


#9

Due to sport specific demands, I work a lot of anti rotation along with other exotic exercises.
So I’m just having fun and trying out new variations and exercises.

I might try it on a bosu ball now.


#10

I tend to think sport-specific training along these lines is highly over-rated, and does not carry over to sports as well as more basic, well-rounded, effective strength-training does. But I guess it looks cool…


#11

I agree but repeating the same Palof press or cook bar exercise over and over gets boring.
I Also believe that working across movement patternes, like the pulling exercise here, will better ones overall ability to move etc.
In my opinion, which could be wrong, learning a new body skill, say a free Handstand, will translate into every other athletic Endeavour. Being a movement athlete, Quality of motion is key and the key to Quality motion comes from control.
Therefor i try to have fun with new exercises every now and Them. Even if it’s a sub par exercise.

Amy ideas on this? Any good Anti rotation exercises?


#12

Half kneeling or high kneeling chops and/ or lifts. Also side plank rows are a fine variation if you’re into that kind of thing. I didn’t like them but I got the idea from Eric Cressey so I trust that they’re right for some people.

Plus here’s an interesting one that you could throw into your warmup:
Exercise of the Week: Challenging Hip Mobility and Core Stability by Eric Cressey


#13

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
I agree but repeating the same Palof press or cook bar exercise over and over gets boring.
I Also believe that working across movement patternes, like the pulling exercise here, will better ones overall ability to move etc.
In my opinion, which could be wrong, learning a new body skill, say a free Handstand, will translate into every other athletic Endeavour. Being a movement athlete, Quality of motion is key and the key to Quality motion comes from control.
Therefor i try to have fun with new exercises every now and Them. Even if it’s a sub par exercise.

Amy ideas on this? Any good Anti rotation exercises?[/quote]

I agree with you on this, exercises like this are great supplements to the big lifts when used correctly. I just wish they fitted more with my current goals and available equipment.


#14

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
I agree but repeating the same Palof press or cook bar exercise over and over gets boring.
I Also believe that working across movement patternes, like the pulling exercise here, will better ones overall ability to move etc.
In my opinion, which could be wrong, learning a new body skill, say a free Handstand, will translate into every other athletic Endeavour.[/quote]
You just have to watch the time invested-to-carryover balance with some of this stuff. Especially with some advanced gymnastic movements, the time it takes to simply learn it safely and efficiently may or may not end up paying off with significant benefit.

One-arm, one-leg plank. Heavy Pallof iso-holds. One-arm overhead squats. Work up to a half-bodyweight one-arm flat DB press for 5 reps. Work up to a half-bodyweight Turkish get-up for 1 per side. That’s a start, no BOSU required. :wink:


#15

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]GrappleShark wrote:
I agree but repeating the same Palof press or cook bar exercise over and over gets boring.
I Also believe that working across movement patternes, like the pulling exercise here, will better ones overall ability to move etc.
In my opinion, which could be wrong, learning a new body skill, say a free Handstand, will translate into every other athletic Endeavour.[/quote]
You just have to watch the time invested-to-carryover balance with some of this stuff. Especially with some advanced gymnastic movements, the time it takes to simply learn it safely and efficiently may or may not end up paying off with significant benefit.

One-arm, one-leg plank. Heavy Pallof iso-holds. One-arm overhead squats. Work up to a half-bodyweight one-arm flat DB press for 5 reps. Work up to a half-bodyweight Turkish get-up for 1 per side. That’s a start, no BOSU required. ;)[/quote]

I’m usually on the matts somewhere betweeen 12-20 hours a week. add the strength training and things are getting pretty taxing. The risk to benifit, point of deminishing returns and the time invested-to-carryover balance are all issues I’m constantly battling and monitoring.

Haha don’t worry, the bosu ball don’t really have my support.
Besides the one-arm-one-leg plank, I am currently working on the rest.
I’m particular fond of the pallof press / hold. I usually perform them in a high kneeling position, sometimes adding a overhead hold as well working on anti lateral movement as well.

What is your view on the law of specificity and incoorperating it into a program?

Being a grappling I’m lying on the ground perhaps, 90% of the time and it is from many different postioins on the ground I’m pulling/pushing, turning etc. Would there be any point in choseing or changing exercises into something that would be more specific, like doing lying pallof presses ?

Appreciate all the responses so far