Homeopathy Opinions?

Complete bullshit?

Yes.

funny word

[quote]Zap Branigan wrote:
Yes.

http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/homeo.html

[/quote]

Naturally, the author is an allopath.

Yup, don’t buy into it.

They actually have caffeine in some of their products which are supposed to help with sleep.

[quote]chillain wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
Yes.

Naturally, the author is an allopath.

[/quote]

He could be a psychopath but it doesn’t change the facts. Homeopathy is based on the ridiculous “dilutions” of the alleged active ingredient. Even if the active worked you are not getting any of it.

[i]
Homeopathic products are made from minerals, botanical substances, and several other sources. If the original substance is soluble, one part is diluted with either nine or ninety-nine parts of distilled water and/or alcohol and shaken vigorously (succussed); if insoluble, it is finely ground and pulverized in similar proportions with powdered lactose (milk sugar). One part of the diluted medicine is then further diluted, and the process is repeated until the desired concentration is reached. Dilutions of 1 to 10 are designated by the Roman numeral X (1X = 1/10, 3X = 1/1,000, 6X = 1/1,000,000). Similarly, dilutions of 1 to 100 are designated by the Roman numeral C (1C = 1/100, 3C = 1/1,000,000, and so on). Most remedies today range from 6X to 30X, but products of 30C or more are marketed.

A 30X dilution means that the original substance has been diluted 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 times. Assuming that a cubic centimeter of water contains 15 drops, this number is greater than the number of drops of water that would fill a container more than 50 times the size of the Earth. Imagine placing a drop of red dye into such a container so that it disperses evenly. Homeopathy’s “law of infinitesimals” is the equivalent of saying that any drop of water subsequently removed from that container will possess an essence of redness. Robert L. Park, Ph.D., a prominent physicist who is executive director of The American Physical Society, has noted that since the least amount of a substance in a solution is one molecule, a 30C solution would have to have at least one molecule of the original substance dissolved in a minimum of 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 molecules of water. This would require a container more than 30,000,000,000 times the size of the Earth.

Oscillococcinum, a 200C product “for the relief of colds and flu-like symptoms,” involves “dilutions” that are even more far-fetched. Its “active ingredient” is prepared by incubating small amounts of a freshly killed duck’s liver and heart for 40 days. The resultant solution is then filtered, freeze-dried, rehydrated, repeatedly diluted, and impregnated into sugar granules. If a single molecule of the duck’s heart or liver were to survive the dilution, its concentration would be 1 in 100200. This huge number, which has 400 zeroes, is vastly greater than the estimated number of molecules in the universe (about one googol, which is a 1 followed by 100 zeroes). In its February 17, 1997, issue, U.S. News & World Report noted that only one duck per year is needed to manufacture the product, which had total sales of $20 million in 1996. The magazine dubbed that unlucky bird “the $20-million duck.”
[/i]

Quackwatch even has its own site devoted to the topic.

Anyone who knows high school chemistry should be able to understand why homeopathy is bullshit. However, it is the worlds safest bullshit, it has no active ingredients!

That is a transcript of a podcast, so you can just listen if you are too lazy to read.

[quote]chillain wrote:
Zap Branigan wrote:
Yes.

Naturally, the author is an allopath.

[/quote]

An allopath is essentially, by definition, someone who doesn’t believe in homeopathy. So while you are correct, you are also not saying anything.

[quote]anoddparadigm wrote:
However, it is the worlds safest bullshit, it has no active ingredients![/quote]

Safe only until patients fail to receive proper treatment for diseases that could have been diagnosed or cured with conventional medicine because they lay their trust in homeopathic remedies.

Basically, no disagreement with what you’re saying, though. Drinking overpriced water is no health hazard in and of itself…

[quote]michael2507 wrote:
anoddparadigm wrote:
However, it is the worlds safest bullshit, it has no active ingredients!

Safe only until patients fail to receive proper treatment for diseases that could have been diagnosed or cured with conventional medicine because they lay their trust in homeopathic remedies.

Basically, no disagreement with what you’re saying, though. Drinking overpriced water is no health hazard in and of itself… [/quote]

Agreed.

I had arguements with my mom and threatened her homeopath because she was selling her this crap, when my mom had high blood pressure.

I don’t think she all convinced yet, but I told my dad to not give her any money on shit and to take her to a real doctor next time.

[quote]michael2507 wrote:
anoddparadigm wrote:
However, it is the worlds safest bullshit, it has no active ingredients!

Safe only until patients fail to receive proper treatment for diseases that could have been diagnosed or cured with conventional medicine because they lay their trust in homeopathic remedies.

Basically, no disagreement with what you’re saying, though. Drinking overpriced water is no health hazard in and of itself… [/quote]

You are completely correct- I only meant safe from a pharmacology perspective. I saw a BBC report where they went to 10 different homeopaths and telling them they were going to west africa and wanted something to protect them from malaria. They all were given homeopathic remedies and not told to get a vaccination. Idiocy, no matter how seemingly benign, can be dangerous.

found the article-

[quote]anoddparadigm wrote:
michael2507 wrote:
anoddparadigm wrote:
However, it is the worlds safest bullshit, it has no active ingredients!

Safe only until patients fail to receive proper treatment for diseases that could have been diagnosed or cured with conventional medicine because they lay their trust in homeopathic remedies.

Basically, no disagreement with what you’re saying, though. Drinking overpriced water is no health hazard in and of itself…

You are completely correct- I only meant safe from a pharmacology perspective. I saw a BBC report where they went to 10 different homeopaths and telling them they were going to west africa and wanted something to protect them from malaria. They all were given homeopathic remedies and not told to get a vaccination. Idiocy, no matter how seemingly benign, can be dangerous.

found the article-
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/newsnight/5178122.stm[/quote]

Unreal.

I’m amazed people can actually study this witchcraft.

[quote]
michael2507 wrote:

Unreal.

I’m amazed people can actually study this witchcraft.[/quote]

There is a lot of money in witchcraft.

Wait, sorry, only the evil pharmaceutical companies believe in money.

I don’t know. How many of you have real experience with homeopathy? Obviously you can find a link to support any argument.

I mean, acupuncture does not fit into the allopathic paradigm either, but I know that at least in some cases it is useful (not in all cases, but neither is allopathy).
Curing people by sticking needles (acuppuncture) in them makes about as much sense to me as diluting a material down until it is not even traceable and having the patient take it (homeopathy). I have european acquaintances that swear by homeopathy. Maybe they are deceived. I don’t know. I prefer, as with all things, to remain sceptical, but open-minded.

I don’t believe in homeopathy because it’s based on an unsound physiological rationale.

I actually know people who have reaped huge benefits from natural medicine, not necessarily homeopathy specifically. One woman I know got rid of tumors on her ovaries with natural medicine before engaging in any conventional medicine. Of course like any and all things in our society there are people trying to sell you shit. That’s really a natural result of the world we live in. But I’m sure that many natural medicine practitioners are legitimately interested in health and try to sell legitimate products.

But if you think about it you are all posting on a site that is really all about natural medicine and preventative health. In many cases natural medicine is no more than diet and lifestyle choices. I mean most of the products sold on t nation are essentially preventative medicine products. Superfood, REZ-V and creatine are good examples.

So I’d say that just because one strain or individual of a category like natural health is a dickbag try not to stereotype the whole category.

-chris

This should clear things up for you. I particularly like the testimonials.

http://www.fdhom.co.uk/index.asp

[quote]Avocado wrote:
So I’d say that just because one strain or individual of a category like natural health is a dickbag try not to stereotype the whole category.
-chris[/quote]

I am just going to stick with homeopathy today. Homeopathy is NOT herbal or traditional medicine. It is often lumped in the broad catagory of alternative medicine, which itself is a mixed bag. Many modern medicines come directly from herbal traditions, for example aspirin and willows bark.

Homeopathy is different, homeopathy has no active ingredients except either water or sugar. It relies on mystical explanations for its effect. I would look past that if it indeed had an effect, but it has been rigorously tested and been shown to be no more then a placebo. There is no conceivable scientific explanation for how homeopathy could work and further there is no evidence that it does indeed work. The latter is what makes me dismiss it.

[quote]tonymoore wrote:
This should clear things up for you. I particularly like the testimonials.

http://www.fdhom.co.uk/index.asp [/quote]

*Guaranteed as effective as all other homeopathic remedies. **“Treat” in no way implies “cure”. �?�Requires belief