T Nation

Home Gym Creation Link

Hi,

There was a thread started a few months ago about putting together a home gym.
Can anyone forward a link to it? I’ve done searches but haven’t come up with anything.
I think the thread discussed issue like best equipment to go for when putting together a good home gym.

Thanks in advance…

http://www.elitefts.com/documents/sick-of-your-gym2.htm

Read this for now… I don’t know where that other link is.

Also, go to www.newyorkbarbells.com and check out the squat racks and “sumo” rack.
They carry a T-Bar row unit that bolts to a wall, floor or power rack that accepts both 1" bars and oly bars. I use it for one hand rows, two hand (stradling bar) rows and full-contact-twists (for abs). Good prices. If you
have the cash, elitefts.com equipment is top notch… the best money can buy.

Thanks for the link Derek.

I’m actaully based in the UK, so I’ll do my purchases with UK companies. However, the tips on the link are giving me some great ideas as to what to look for.

Cheers.

[quote]flying scotsman wrote:
Thanks for the link Derek.

I’m actaully based in the UK, so I’ll do my purchases with UK companies. However, the tips on the link are giving me some great ideas as to what to look for.

Cheers.[/quote]

I think this is the link you are looking for:
http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=523224&pageNo=0

It was a thread started by Chris Shugart on “Hardcore Home Training” that I happened to get a subscription on since I am hoping to get something like this going at some point.

Hope this helps!

Kuz

  • Return with honor.

You don’t necessarily have to shell out big $ for rack etc. I recently moved back into a home gym setup and found a cheap solution for bench and squat safety:

Scaffolding.

Cheap, easy to assembly, will hold more weight than I can currently use and has the added benefit of being dismantlable, which is handy when you have a modern garage like mine that can barely fit a lunchbox.

A Dan John article I read recently recommended saw horses for a height adjustable racking system…options abound.

Just food for thought.

Scaffolding? That’s an interesting idea. Do you use it to bench and squat? How do you adjust the hieght?

[quote]sam747 wrote:
Scaffolding? That’s an interesting idea. Do you use it to bench and squat? How do you adjust the hieght?[/quote]

sorry for bing a wippersnaper here. I have seen this used. with a scaff wrench it is fairly easy, just mark out even steps on iy by grinding tiny bits out on all sides so you can adjust bits as per power rack.

wrt bar placment, i had seen had the bracket for resting the bar drilled/bolted on to the wall with spacer.

it was drilled/bolted into floor/wall and looked plent sturdt for the 400lb that was on there.

It was with steel not alli scaffolding.

I know that scaff can vary from country to country though,

It seemed to work well enough and you can nick if from a site or 2!

[quote]miniross wrote:
sorry for bing a wippersnaper here. I have seen this used. with a scaff wrench it is fairly easy, just mark out even steps on iy by grinding tiny bits out on all sides so you can adjust bits as per power rack.

wrt bar placment, i had seen had the bracket for resting the bar drilled/bolted on to the wall with spacer.

it was drilled/bolted into floor/wall and looked plent sturdt for the 400lb that was on there.

It was with steel not alli scaffolding.

I know that scaff can vary from country to country though,

It seemed to work well enough and you can nick if from a site or 2![/quote]

I thought they spoke English in England. What the hell did you just say?

[quote]sam747 wrote:
miniross wrote:
sorry for bing a wippersnaper here. I have seen this used. with a scaff wrench it is fairly easy, just mark out even steps on iy by grinding tiny bits out on all sides so you can adjust bits as per power rack.

wrt bar placment, i had seen had the bracket for resting the bar drilled/bolted on to the wall with spacer.

it was drilled/bolted into floor/wall and looked plent sturdt for the 400lb that was on there.

It was with steel not alli scaffolding.

I know that scaff can vary from country to country though,

It seemed to work well enough and you can nick if from a site or 2!

I thought they spoke English in England. What the hell did you just say?[/quote]

ILMAO. I could never understand that Cockney either. Thought it was just me.

DB

Here is another link for a great setup from EliteFTS.

http://www.flexcart.com/members/elitefts/frames.asp?cid=120

[quote]sam747 wrote:
I thought they spoke English in England. What the hell did you just say?[/quote]

That’s the funniest thing I’ve read on here in a long time!!!

sam747,

Actually it isn’t the adjust with a spanner type of scaffolding, it is the type that has pre-fabricated sections with smaller bracing. It is hard to explain without decent pics, but I’ll give it a go…

The sides are essentially a vertical pipe, with two "rails’ joining them, one near the top, another near the bottom like this:

||
| |
|
|
| |

The joining pieces connect to the top (and bottom) of each side and are short H shapes:

|__________|
| |

They interlock to form a strong section that stops the sides from falling over.

The beauty of this is that it requires no tools and it is the perfect height for me to do rock bottom squats. It is a little to high to be good for bench, I have to incline my bench slightly. Nothing an angle grinder won’t fix. I have a free standing squat rack (no safety rails, just vertical poles) to hold the weight for setup, and I just rest the bar on the rails and start my benches from the bottom position.

As there are no tools required, it sets up and packs away in about 2 minutes, including walk time to retrieve them from around the side of the house.

Works for me.

[quote]sam747 wrote:
I thought they spoke English in England. What the hell did you just say?[/quote]

Ah, England and America - two countries divided by a common language :slight_smile:

hmmm,

That’s what I get for trying to draw in ascii…but you get the idea.

[quote]sam747 wrote:
miniross wrote:
sorry for bing a wippersnaper here. I have seen this used. with a scaff wrench it is fairly easy, just mark out even steps on iy by grinding tiny bits out on all sides so you can adjust bits as per power rack.

wrt bar placment, i had seen had the bracket for resting the bar drilled/bolted on to the wall with spacer.

it was drilled/bolted into floor/wall and looked plent sturdt for the 400lb that was on there.

It was with steel not alli scaffolding.

I know that scaff can vary from country to country though,

It seemed to work well enough and you can nick if from a site or 2!

I thought they spoke English in England. What the hell did you just say?[/quote]

Ahh man, I thought the exact same thing!! Here I was trying to visualize what he was saying and I lost him at the 5th word!

[quote]aschy wrote:
sam747 wrote:
miniross wrote:
sorry for bing a wippersnaper here. I have seen this used. with a scaff wrench it is fairly easy, just mark out even steps on iy by grinding tiny bits out on all sides so you can adjust bits as per power rack.

wrt bar placment, i had seen had the bracket for resting the bar drilled/bolted on to the wall with spacer.

it was drilled/bolted into floor/wall and looked plent sturdt for the 400lb that was on there.

It was with steel not alli scaffolding.

I know that scaff can vary from country to country though,

It seemed to work well enough and you can nick if from a site or 2!

I thought they spoke English in England. What the hell did you just say?

Ahh man, I thought the exact same thing!! Here I was trying to visualize what he was saying and I lost him at the 5th word! [/quote]

Generally, a “spanner” is “English” for a Crescent (adjustable) wrench.

May i redirect you to the “different meanings” link!!!

Writing is a problem.

speaking is…a problem!

Actually, have read the post.

doesn’t make much sense, does it.

It’s okay, I like you limey bastards. I’ve even had a Black & Tan before.

You have now lost me…

Black and tan…is that a redneck comment :slight_smile: !!!

It is an Irish concoction.

1)Pour half a glass of Harp beer in a glass.

  1. Now this is the tricky part: hold a spoon over the glass with the convex (back)side up and very slowly pour Guinness over the spoon.

The resulting drink should not mix, resulting in a beer that is half black and half Tan