T Nation

Hollow Pull-Ups?

anyone heard of this?
suppose to be best technique to recruit the lats for pull-ups.
guy seems intelligent but is this quackery or is he on to something?

Guy needs to tan.

It obviously uses your abs more but Its not going to make your lats bigger or stronger than normal pull-ups IMO. This is just a specific technique for gymnasts and such.

Somehow, I think the guys who built the biggest lats already know the best technique to recruit the lats…and when was there only “one”?

Not hating but “this is difficult to see due to heavy musculature” made me lol

He lost all credibility at 2:00, when his “five fingers” came onto the screen

I viewed this quickly, but if the guy is a Gymnastics coach, and he’s advocating a technique to improve the performance of gymnasts, and not to build as much muscle as possible (as supported by his ‘heavy musculature’), then what service would it be to a bodybuilder?

S

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
I viewed this quickly, but if the guy is a Gymnastics coach, and he’s advocating a technique to improve the performance of gymnasts, and not to build as much muscle as possible (as supported by his ‘heavy musculature’), then what service would it be to a bodybuilder?

S[/quote]

MIGHTY,
I agree 110% with you on gymnastic thing but…funny,his way of doing pull-ups it’s very close on your way to do V handle push-downz on the tube,I mean ; elbows in front of your body,“pushing down” with lats not pulling with bis…
just this :slight_smile:

after doing these with DBs at the feet, it becomes a great ab workout :smiley:

A hollow position pull up just means that you don’t arch your back. It’s a neutral position. You can’t round your back to cheat like in a deadlift. Good luck trying to round your back to make a pull up easier.

I do find that l-sit pullups and lever pullups create worse leverage and help me feel my lats better. A hollow pullup is just a very easy variation of these.

[quote]buzza wrote:

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
I viewed this quickly, but if the guy is a Gymnastics coach, and he’s advocating a technique to improve the performance of gymnasts, and not to build as much muscle as possible (as supported by his ‘heavy musculature’), then what service would it be to a bodybuilder?

S[/quote]

MIGHTY,
I agree 110% with you on gymnastic thing but…funny,his way of doing pull-ups it’s very close on your way to do V handle push-downz on the tube,I mean ; elbows in front of your body,“pushing down” with lats not pulling with bis…
just this :slight_smile:
[/quote]

I’ve adopted that approach to pulldowns an effort to prevent my mid-back from taking the stress when my torso naturally tilts back a bit when doing pullups. I imagine that most people naturally tilt in a similar manner when chinning. My recent protocol is to still perform several sets of pullups afterward though, as I figure the isolation that I am able to subject my lats to with the abbreviated ROM and elbow/torso positioning prefatigues them, and I am better able to target the area I want and not just my ‘back’.

S

This is not a knock on his body at all, but back seems to be his weakest link. So either he doesn’t do them too often, or they don’t work back that much.

Well first off, shouldn’t this guys legs be straight with toes pointed for it to be hollow body?

I have been doing chin-ups with a hollow body, and I feel it makes it a lot easier for me to recruit the lats, and I get a deeper stretch at the bottom.

Lots of great discussion here. First off, that’s me in the video. That’s also me in my profile picture, doing a full front lever underneath a monster truck, which I held for about 10 seconds while my friend took a few pictures with his cell phone. Just so you know who is typing.

Apologies in advance for not making any future replies until April. It is now finals time.

That room does not have particularly fantastic lighting for physique purposes, I gather :slight_smile:

The first thing to know is that I am an athlete, not a bodybuilder. I am primarily interested in function (performance), not looks. That is probably pretty obvious to most people here. I am also a full time student who holds a part time job and still manages to pull a 4.0 despite helping to manage the gymnasticbodies forum and maintain a good relationship with my girlfriend. It’s a lot of work, balancing all of that. I made that video specifically to address confusion on the gymnasticbodies forums, and I appreciate the fact that everyone in this thread has taken the time to watch my video and express their thoughts.

I have been doing shoulder rehab exclusively for the past 5-6 months and haven’t been able to do much of any strength work, so yes my muscles are quite a bit smaller than normal, and smaller still since around 2005, when I was 232 lbs and not 210.

The biggest difference between how I train and how many of you would train is the amount of training volume, because if you are a bodybuilder 100% of your energy goes into building as much muscle as you can, which means you severely limit most other physical activity so that protein synthesis is primarily in growth, and not unnecessary repair. I train to have a large number of skills, which means that my body is making many different training adaptations instead of just one. Doesn’t mean I can’t get as big, or nearly as big, as a high level natural bodybuilder but it will take much longer because that is not my goal. That size will also not make me the best possible athlete, and so is not what I train for.

For you guys who are specifically interested in getting bigger I would suggest a similar set and rep scheme to what you would do for lat pulldowns or your regular pull ups, and have you add weight (as many of you probably do already). I am a huge fan of weighted pull ups, and working them hollow is challenging because the belt will make you arch your back to keep it from slipping off. A vest, holding a dumbbell between your feet (doesn’t work well once you’re using more than 100 lbs in my experience, but was ok for me up to around then), or placing the plates behind your calves flat so that the tension from the chain holds the belt tight (the best thing to do for most) is what you would need to do. Without that tension the belt just falls off when you go hollow.

Someone noticed the similarity in body position between this and L sit pull ups, which is basically correct. L sit pull ups sort of force you into a hollow position and so you are forced to notice the increased lat activation. Any pull that you force to stay hollow will be more lat dominant if done correctly. This also gives you a chance to work your traps extremely hard if you know how to use them in the hollow, which seems to be very hard for most to learn because they only know how to retract when they arch the back. Spinal mobility and scapular mobility should always be able to be performed separately AND together. You shouldn’t have to arch your back to use your traps, but that is a completely separate issue.

I am also not suggesting that hollow pull ups are the best pull up, you need a variety both as an athlete and a bodybuilder. This particular variety just does a lot more for prime mover strength and direct strengthening of a position required for higher level gymnastic strength. As a bodybuilder, being stronger means you get to lift heavier and that means you get to grow bigger (assuming your nutrition is on point) so I don’t know why anyone wouldn’t want to do that. I also see very few really well developed lower lats on any natural guys, and hollow pull ups really help in that area.

I have had quite a lot of problems in my right shoulder since 2008 as a result of training injuries sustained at BUD/S Class 245 in March of 2003 and subsequent maladaptive neural patterns learned while scrubbing walls (and doing most physical labor) on my ship for 3 years with only my right arm because the left didn’t work well enough to do anything for more than 15 seconds or so. Severed axillary nerve was the issue. Apparently the myelin sheath wasn’t ruptured because eventually the fibers regenerated. Took a few years before I could feel anything and it took about 10 months before I could hold a glass of milk and drink it with my left arm.

What you see is a fairly battered body that hasn’t been able to be trained hard since 2008 and yet can still do as much athletically as the majority of college athletes, which I know for a fact because I play around with some of them and can match them or beat them on most things, weight room and more importantly on the field, and quite a number of things outside of specific sports. I don’t seem them able to do handstand push ups, slow muscle ups, back flips, or any of the pulling I can do, but I can run and jump and cut with all but the very best and I don’t even specifically train for that. It is the nature of my workouts that creates that kind of ability. When it comes to athletics, size alone does not indicate ability. You can’t see all the muscles that an athlete needs. Every single one who knows me asks for training advice for one simple reason: I end up helping them become better athletes. Sometimes they need to put on 15 lbs in the summer, and other times they just want to be stronger than they are and don’t know how to get there.

As for the heavy musculature comment, it is very hard to see my spine. I have a lot of muscle on both sides of the spine, which is why I still pull 450 on deadlifts pretty easily with no belt, no chalk, and no squat or deadlift training for the past 2 years or so, aside from a random set for fun with friends every few months. I will say that my lower back felt unstable with 450, and that was actually the reason I am slowly starting to get back into real lower body training. Back when I used to deadlift regularly, 4x10-12 with 405 and straight legs with bar lightly touching the ground on a rocking ship was easy. People used to think I was crazy. Anyhow… The spinal musculature obscures the slight back curvature that you would see on a slimmer individual. That is not the best deadlift on these boards by any means, but it’s not half bad for not training it for so long. In no way am I suggesting that I look like Ronnie Coleman.

I am also surprised to hear that someone thinks my back is my worst body part, I personally think it’s my chest. Upper back is pretty crappy right now too though.

[quote]howie424 wrote:
Well first off, shouldn’t this guys legs be straight with toes pointed for it to be hollow body?

I have been doing chin-ups with a hollow body, and I feel it makes it a lot easier for me to recruit the lats, and I get a deeper stretch at the bottom.[/quote]

Last comment before I disappear for finals. If I could have straightened my legs without my feet having to go through a concrete slab, I would have done so :slight_smile:

Second, a hollow body has nothing to do with the legs. The legs have a lot to do with leverage disadvantage when you are horizontal, but the hollow is still the shape of the spine. The legs are not the shape of the spine. A good hollow is a very, very slight C shape. No S curve at any point. At first, and for a long time, that will mean a more noticeable C shape until one is strong enough to hold a seemingly straight body.

What you have noticed is what everyone who performs hollow pull ups correctly will notice.

This guy’s back is better than Ronny Rockel’s.

holy shit this guy talks so much
thx for letting us know that ur doing well at skool brah

[quote]Slizzardman wrote:

[quote]howie424 wrote:
Well first off, shouldn’t this guys legs be straight with toes pointed for it to be hollow body?

I have been doing chin-ups with a hollow body, and I feel it makes it a lot easier for me to recruit the lats, and I get a deeper stretch at the bottom.[/quote]

Last comment before I disappear for finals. If I could have straightened my legs without my feet having to go through a concrete slab, I would have done so :slight_smile:

Second, a hollow body has nothing to do with the legs. The legs have a lot to do with leverage disadvantage when you are horizontal, but the hollow is still the shape of the spine. The legs are not the shape of the spine. A good hollow is a very, very slight C shape. No S curve at any point. At first, and for a long time, that will mean a more noticeable C shape until one is strong enough to hold a seemingly straight body.

What you have noticed is what everyone who performs hollow pull ups correctly will notice.[/quote]

I understand, I wasn’t thinking clearly. Obviously with tuck front/back levers one would have legs tucked, but still manage a hollow body position. It is about hips more then the legs themselves.

[quote]PB Andy wrote:
This guy’s back is better than Ronny Rockel’s.[/quote]

Lol, yeah, but Rockel’s muscles just look… different.

S