T Nation

Hockey Player Bulk


#1

Christian,

In your new article “Nutrition for Newbies - Part 1”, you mention a 6’1", 165 pound hockey player, gaining 25 pounds in a year with your changes to his diet. Well, I’m that exact size. Probably built just like him too; have been playing hockey since I was 8. How did you get him there?


#2

[quote]kingbrady wrote:

Christian,

In your new article “Nutrition for Newbies - Part 1”, you mention a 6’1", 165 pound hockey player, gaining 25 pounds in a year with your changes to his diet. Well, I’m that exact size. Probably built just like him too; have been playing hockey since I was 8. How did you get him there? [/quote]

Dude, that was about 15 years ago. I have decent memory but I don’t remember all the details. I know that it was a Quebec Major Junior player named Mathieu Curadeau. He got a trial with Rangers but didn’t work out. He has just started his own agency.

Anyway the thing I remember was that he thought he ate a lot, but it was really one big lunch (often fast food)… often skipped breakfast and would have a very light supper because he wasn’t hungry from the big lunch. He would also rarely have snacks and when he did it was a chocolate bar or chips.

So yeah the diet changes helped but he ate so little and most of it was crap that his body sucked everything up.


#3

So definitely needs to spread his meals throughout the day 4-6 times. Also, needs better quality. Being as active as he was with hockey, and his poor eating habits, 25 pounds in a year is impressive.

I guess a better question would be, if you were given a 165 pound, 21 year old (me), what kind of diet would you recommend? Calories/macros/quantities of foods, things of that nature.


#4

[quote]kingbrady wrote:
So definitely needs to spread his meals throughout the day 4-6 times. Also, needs better quality. Being as active as he was with hockey, and his poor eating habits, 25 pounds in a year is impressive.

I guess a better question would be, if you were given a 165 pound, 21 year old (me), what kind of diet would you recommend? Calories/macros/quantities of foods, things of that nature. [/quote]

The guy was 17… much easier to grow at that age, so it must be put in perspective.

Well the first thing would be to assess current food intake vs. weight.

For example write down everything you eat for 7 days. Including quantities. Everything you eat and drink that has calories/nutrients in it.

Then calculate how much calories you ate on average per day during those 7 days and see if your body weight stayed the same, increased (by how much) or decreased (by how much).

For example let’s say you hate on average 2700 calories per day and your weight stayed the same it is safe to assume that 2700 calories allows you to maintain your weight. You would thus add about 20% for that number to find the average caloric intake you should consume for fairly rapid weight gain.

If you lost weight during the week then you’d have to bump calories even more. If you gained a little bit of weight you might keep it there or only bump it by 10%.

That’s for caloric intake and YES it is important.

Then you select your food content. The first thing is to establish your daily protein intake… 1g per pound of body weight is normally enough. Then you must plan your peri-workout protocol. The proteins and carbs you consume pre, during and post workout. Here you should go with PLAZMA at 1 or 1.5 serving pre-workout and 1 - 1.5 serving during the workout. After the workout you could go with MAG-10 or SURGE WORKOUT FUEL.

The next step is to calculate how much carbs and fat per day.

Let’s say (for example) that you need to eat 3500 calories per day. And 170g of protein. 170g of protein is about 680 calories. So that leaves you about 2800 to consume from carbs or fats.

For a hockey player I like more carbs than fats since carbs are a better fuel source for your sport. Fats are needed but mostly for health and proper functioning. A 65 - 35 carbs to fat split is a good starting point.

Since we have (IN OUR EXAMPLE… you’ll have to find your own number) 2800 calories to spread that means 1820 from carbs and 980 from fats.

1 gram of carbs has roughly 4 calories so 1820 calories from carbs = 455g
1 gram of fat has roughly 9 calories so 980 calories from fats = 110g

THEN you have to spread these nutrients throughout the day. The two biggest carbs periods should be morning and peri-workout (or practice) (from PLAZMA). You should have carbs in most meals but the biggest portions should be at these two times.

Finally you have to make the best food choices. Except for peri-workout you want the most natural food sources possible. Two selection criterias: 1) the less ingredients the better (for example rice only has “rice” has ingredient, so 1… “rice krispies” has 15 ingredients… so rice is better than rice krispies) … 2) the more natural the food is, the better.

There are other elements to consider but that’s a good start.


Beginner Bodybuilder
#5

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]kingbrady wrote:
So definitely needs to spread his meals throughout the day 4-6 times. Also, needs better quality. Being as active as he was with hockey, and his poor eating habits, 25 pounds in a year is impressive.

I guess a better question would be, if you were given a 165 pound, 21 year old (me), what kind of diet would you recommend? Calories/macros/quantities of foods, things of that nature. [/quote]

The guy was 17… much easier to grow at that age, so it must be put in perspective.

Well the first thing would be to assess current food intake vs. weight.

For example write down everything you eat for 7 days. Including quantities. Everything you eat and drink that has calories/nutrients in it.

Then calculate how much calories you ate on average per day during those 7 days and see if your body weight stayed the same, increased (by how much) or decreased (by how much).

For example let’s say you hate on average 2700 calories per day and your weight stayed the same it is safe to assume that 2700 calories allows you to maintain your weight. You would thus add about 20% for that number to find the average caloric intake you should consume for fairly rapid weight gain.

If you lost weight during the week then you’d have to bump calories even more. If you gained a little bit of weight you might keep it there or only bump it by 10%.

That’s for caloric intake and YES it is important.

Then you select your food content. The first thing is to establish your daily protein intake… 1g per pound of body weight is normally enough. Then you must plan your peri-workout protocol. The proteins and carbs you consume pre, during and post workout. Here you should go with PLAZMA at 1 or 1.5 serving pre-workout and 1 - 1.5 serving during the workout. After the workout you could go with MAG-10 or SURGE WORKOUT FUEL.

The next step is to calculate how much carbs and fat per day.

Let’s say (for example) that you need to eat 3500 calories per day. And 170g of protein. 170g of protein is about 680 calories. So that leaves you about 2800 to consume from carbs or fats.

For a hockey player I like more carbs than fats since carbs are a better fuel source for your sport. Fats are needed but mostly for health and proper functioning. A 65 - 35 carbs to fat split is a good starting point.

Since we have (IN OUR EXAMPLE… you’ll have to find your own number) 2800 calories to spread that means 1820 from carbs and 980 from fats.

1 gram of carbs has roughly 4 calories so 1820 calories from carbs = 455g
1 gram of fat has roughly 9 calories so 980 calories from fats = 110g

THEN you have to spread these nutrients throughout the day. The two biggest carbs periods should be morning and peri-workout (or practice) (from PLAZMA). You should have carbs in most meals but the biggest portions should be at these two times.

Finally you have to make the best food choices. Except for peri-workout you want the most natural food sources possible. Two selection criterias: 1) the less ingredients the better (for example rice only has “rice” has ingredient, so 1… “rice krispies” has 15 ingredients… so rice is better than rice krispies) … 2) the more natural the food is, the better.

There are other elements to consider but that’s a good start.
[/quote]

Hi CT

What a good answer! Not a hockey player myself, but its clear that can be applied by anyone.

I know that it is a cliche, but I really wish you an incroyable 2016! :wink: