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Hise Shrug

The Hise shrug, invented by Joseph Curtis Hise, who was often referred to as the “Father of American weight training” was a staple movement for strength athletes in the past. Today, it is seldom, if ever performed. In my 26 years of training, I have never seen anyone other than myself perform this movement which is unfortunate because it’s an incredible exercise for upper back and even overall strength and development. To perform the Hise shrug, get into the exact position that you would for performing a back squat, with the bar high up on your traps. Stand erect and simply shrug your shoulders as high as possible to your ears. Pause as the top for a least a full second, lower and repeat. Coordinate your breathing so that you inhale as you shrug upwards and exhale as you let the shoulders back down. Start with moderate weights to get the form down, but eventually the goal is to use very heavy weights for very repetitions in the 20-25 range. This exercise will hurt-I can promise you that-but you will be rewarded with increased growth in your upper back and traps. I have also found that it also helps to establish a solid base for positioning the bar when doing squats.

Another version of this movement is to get into a standing calf machine with a solid foot placement and do shrugs with the yoke of the machine across the top of the shoulders. Use the same formula as the traditional Hise Shrugs-one heavy set of 20- 25 reps. I would perform the Hise Shrug at the end of the back workout as it can be quite taxing. As is true with life and in the gym-if you are willing to pay the price that others will not-you will reap the benefits that others will not"

Keith

I have done the calf raise version of these a few times and they do work those traps. I will try the bar version on my next trap day. Thanks for all your great insights.

Thad

Nice info. I think that the back squat bar is the way to go for both the trap and calve work…I tried doing standing calf raises. After maxing the machine out, my calves still didn’t have enough weight to work them, and I had scarse on my traps/shoulders from the damned machine.

How’s this? Tri-sets on squat days: Squat, shrug, calf-raise, repeat? too much? I know my calves can always raise whatever I squat, but I don’t know about the traps.

Any thoughts?

Do we have an echo in here? :slight_smile:

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=462145

[quote]Dave2 wrote:
Do we have an echo in here? :slight_smile:

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=462145

[/quote]

The search engine on this site certainly isn’t the greatest, so 4 year old information can certainly get lost in the shuffle.

But when you search “Hise Shrug” this is the first article to appear.

i wanna see that guys traps. i mean hes been doing it for yrs so he should be yoked. i do havea thing for huge traps. they just make u look yoked

No echoes.

A resonance: now you can do 'em with your front squat harness, too.

[quote]relentlessfury wrote:
i wanna see that guys traps. i mean hes been doing it for yrs so he should be yoked. i do havea thing for huge traps. they just make u look yoked[/quote]

Well, I don’t know how ‘yoked’ he is at the present, but Keith was a damn strong mofo in his younger days. He definately knows what he’s talking about.

Here’s another variation on shrugs, just to throw one out there. Lay face down on an incline bench (30-45 degrees) and grab some dumbells (I’d say about 50-70% the weight you would normally use for dbell shrugs). Nothing new there, but there is a twist: Start the movement with a normal shrug. At the top of the movement, hold for a second. Then you push your arms out, keeping them straight, like you’re doing a lateral raise. You should only be able to raise them about 15 degrees or so. Lower the weights while maintaining this angle. At the bottom of the movement, let the arms come back to hanging straight down and repeat. It’s a great variation, especially if you train traps alot and don’t seem to get sore anymore.

Links aren’t working, I’m going to try to attach them.

The Hise shrug is a nice movement. I have done them using the Calf machine many times.

Thanks for the reminder Keith!


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I have found that seated dumbbell cleans are also good. I started them while trying to do pre-hab work doing the Westside work out. I learned quickly how effective they are.
Keith, good to see some old schoolers out there still doing the Hise. At least I’m not the only one.

[quote]relentlessfury wrote:
i wanna see that guys traps. i mean hes been doing it for yrs so he should be yoked. i do havea thing for huge traps. they just make u look yoked[/quote]

These things are usually only done by guys with big(ger) traps. If you have very little meat up there it can become quite painful. Found that out when we tried to have a newbie do them :-0

Seated dumbell cleans can also be used to focus on scapular rotators, by focusing hard on elbows close and elbows up, so pick your movement pattern for your goals.

Anyone try one that I like:
“Dip-shrugs”: You get in the dip position or can put elbows on the hanging leg raise pads and shrug your body up?

[quote]mertdawg wrote:
Seated dumbell cleans can also be used to focus on scapular rotators, by focusing hard on elbows close and elbows up, so pick your movement pattern for your goals.

Anyone try one that I like:
“Dip-shrugs”: You get in the dip position or can put elbows on the hanging leg raise pads and shrug your body up? [/quote]

The “dip-shrugs” that you mention will not work your traps. You are not raising your scapula, you are lowering them. You would be working your lats, serratus anterior, and the many little muscles that depress your scapula.

“so pick your movement patterns for your goals.”

Did these today on the standing calf machine. I like how they felt as opposed to doing them with the barbell on your back. Jim Wendler from EFS does a version of these on the power squat and he has huge traps. Lok at Dave Tate’s 26 reasons article and you’ll see Jim’s traps

thanks super but it said

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The “dip-shrugs” that you mention will not work your traps. You are not raising your scapula, you are lowering them. You would be working your lats, serratus anterior, and the many little muscles that depress your scapula.

Obviously.