T Nation

Hiring a Coach

I’m not planning on it personally, but just kinda curious…

At what point do you think it would be reasonable to hire a coach? Someone like John Meadows, Shelby, etc. Should you only hire someone to work with on training and/or nutrition if you are a competitor? If you’re not, is there a certain time frame of training you think one should have under their belt? Or certain strength benchmarks?

Reasons why people hire a coach:

  1. They don’t have the knowledge necessary to reach their goals, or if they do read a lot of information, aren’t too savvy in applying it or don’t trust themselves or don’t want to be bothered with monitoring their own progress. This isn’t a bad thing. People have a lot of shit to do in life. Hiring a coach can relieve stress.

  2. They’re lazy or unsavvy in researching and experimenting. There are some men that are so lazy they can’t even search around THIS site, let alone the whole damn net, for the information they need. If they’re this lazy, how the heck are they going to go through the pain in the ass by applying information?

  3. People competing at a very high level and don’t want to leave stuff to chance and go a highly experienced person to take them to the “next level”.

You don’t need to compete. Most nutritionist’s and trainer’s clientele are regular people, even the most popular.

[quote]wesmantooth wrote:
At what point do you think it would be reasonable to hire a coach? Someone like John Meadows, Shelby, etc. Should you only hire someone to work with on training and/or nutrition if you are a competitor? If you’re not, is there a certain time frame of training you think one should have under their belt? Or certain strength benchmarks?[/quote]

I think that if the money is not a problem, then hiring a good “coach” is ALWAYS a good thing, no matter your “level”. You will typically make better progress than on your own (at least during the time you hire him).

I have a hard time to think of a scenario where a client would be worse off, hiring someone GOOD. Hence, I think the (reasonable) worst-case scenario is that you will not make more progress with him than you would on your own. Now if money is a problem, you need consider more things of course.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
Reasons why people hire a coach:

  1. They don’t have the knowledge necessary to reach their goals, or if they do read a lot of information, aren’t too savvy in applying it or don’t trust themselves or don’t want to be bothered with monitoring their own progress. This isn’t a bad thing. People have a lot of shit to do in life. Hiring a coach can relieve stress.

  2. They’re lazy or unsavvy in researching and experimenting. There are some men that are so lazy they can’t even search around THIS site, let alone the whole damn net, for the information they need. If they’re this lazy, how the heck are they going to go through the pain in the ass by applying information?

  3. People competing at a very high level and don’t want to leave stuff to chance and go a highly experienced person to take them to the “next level”.

You don’t need to compete. Most nutritionist’s and trainer’s clientele are regular people, even the most popular. [/quote]

Solid. Most successful people have some kind of coach, wehther it’s a life coach, business coach, etc…

Really comes down to the whole idea of “If you train yourself, you have an idiot for a client”.

While that may sound harsh, to jehovasfitness’s point, most successful people have alot of knowledge, experience and skill, yet still seek out some sort of other expert, mentor or coach. Having another set of educated and experienced eyes on your training & nutrition helps take the guess work out of things as well as prevents you from settling in our “comfort zones” (something as humans well all do to an extent), addressing our weak points and do the things that really matter.

Now, reading and researching yourself can get you far in personal fitness, most of us do this nowadays, especially with this great internet thing, but we could also read and research how to do a root canal, just does not make us dentists. Working with a good coach, mentor or teacher in any field is going to make your chances of success in that field much, much higher.

After 18 years training and competing in over a dozen shows, I finally decided to hire a coach this year and got in the best shape of my life. Was I just lazy or uneducated all this time? Maybe, we tend to think will are doing the right things towards our goals until someone points out what exactly you are doing completely wrong and what you can do better, holding you to a higher standard of effort, discipline and commitment.

You just have to decide if your present level is enough for you and if you do decide to hire a coach, do the Bruce Lee thing and “empty your cup” (empty your mind of your previous experience), so he/she can full it up with new ideas.

Thanks for the replies. I’m exactly what you guys described. I’m a trainer and have no problem getting other people results, but I read and study so much about this stuff that I’m always switching things up, doing new things, doubting myself, and doing the opposite of Dan John when he said to “keep the goal, the goal.” My main problem is focusing on strength instead of physique. I’ll do a strength program, beat the hell out of my joints, and then remember that the main goal for me is hypertrophy.

So then I’ll switch to a bodybuilding template, but start feeling like I’m not strong enough. Money isn’t really a problem, but I just wasn’t sure at what level one would feel like it was a necessary pursuit. I’d love to work with Meadows or Skip.

I’ve known many pro competitors who will still hire coaches despite being amazing resources of knowledge themselves. Sometimes, holding yourself accountable to someone else, or simply not having to be objective about yourself (not always an easy task) are all the reasons you need.

It’s never a bad thing if you’re doing it for the right reasons.

S

A coach brings about a sense of commitment. If you pay, you’ll go.
I could see a nutrition coach or infallible diet plan well before a training coach.

Because I did not make the progress I would like after 18 months of training

Mat’

Yeah, I feel okay on the training side of things, but feel like I’m bouncing all over the place with the nutritional stuff. Really thinking about working with Skip.

[quote]Myosin wrote:
Really comes down to the whole idea of “If you train yourself, you have an idiot for a client”.

While that may sound harsh, to jehovasfitness’s point, most successful people have alot of knowledge, experience and skill, yet still seek out some sort of other expert, mentor or coach. Having another set of educated and experienced eyes on your training & nutrition helps take the guess work out of things as well as prevents you from settling in our “comfort zones” (something as humans well all do to an extent), addressing our weak points and do the things that really matter.

Now, reading and researching yourself can get you far in personal fitness, most of us do this nowadays, especially with this great internet thing, but we could also read and research how to do a root canal, just does not make us dentists. Working with a good coach, mentor or teacher in any field is going to make your chances of success in that field much, much higher.

After 18 years training and competing in over a dozen shows, I finally decided to hire a coach this year and got in the best shape of my life. Was I just lazy or uneducated all this time? Maybe, we tend to think will are doing the right things towards our goals until someone points out what exactly you are doing completely wrong and what you can do better, holding you to a higher standard of effort, discipline and commitment.

You just have to decide if your present level is enough for you and if you do decide to hire a coach, do the Bruce Lee thing and “empty your cup” (empty your mind of your previous experience), so he/she can full it up with new ideas.[/quote]Excellent point.