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Hips Hurting with Deadlifts

After I deadlift I’ve noticed that my hips feel awkward. By this I mean that they almost hurt, but not actually. If I could describe it I’d say that it feels like they are just about to cramp up, but they never actually do. It’s a bone-deep sensation, and doesn’t feel muscle-related.

I’ve noticed that it’s really appeared since I started leaning back more while in the middle of the lift (shifting my butt down and almost pulling back a little bit against the weight in addition to up)

Has anyone else noticed this? Is it a symptom of doing it wrong?

Edit: The sensation was most intense after maxing out the other day, and went away completely when I hung upside down by my knees for about three minutes to decompress my spine.

Do you foam roll?

Do you do any mobility or activation prior to warm-up?

No to both.

Edit: I do some core activation activation, but I’m guessing that’s not related to what you’re getting at.

I used to have the same feeling after I locked out my max, but it went away after a while. A forceful lockout with the hips pushing forward is actually good, but probably creates this joint discomfort.

It helps to warm up with lightweight quite a bit before u hit ur working weight. Joints and tendons do adapt to new loads, they just take longer. Working in higher reps has been known to condition joints/tendons without straining them. Hope that helps.

[quote]trav123456 wrote:
I used to have the same feeling after I locked out my max, but it went away after a while. A forceful lockout with the hips pushing forward is actually good, but probably creates this joint discomfort. It helps to warm up with lightweight quite a bit before u hit ur working weight. Joints and tendons do adapt to new loads, they just take longer. Working in higher reps has been known to condition joints/tendons without straining them. Hope that helps.[/quote]

That does. Hopefully the german velocity training I’m about to add to my workouts will help.

If you are going to punish yourself with German Volume Training, it’d be best to learn some mobility drills and invest in a foam roller, as previously mentioned. 10x10 at working weight is not going to be easier on your hips then regular sets.

I’ve recently gotten my back better after a nasty injury, so I’m pretty good at warming up to deadlifts right now.

On my way to the gym, in my car I put the heat on (winter or summer) to the point where I’m almost sweating hot.

I’m not sure what you wear when you train, but I keep a sweatshirt and sweatpants on to keep my body warm, then maybe I’ll shed some clothing for heavier lifts (just so they don’t get in the way mainly)

For my warm ups on deadlift days this is what I do:

Inchworms
Leg swings (back/forth & side-2-side)
Light squats (ass to grass)
Overhead squats w/ empty bar
Foam roll my quads (all around from groin to the opposite side) and back
Psoas marches
Static Lunge-n-holds
and maybe a few jumps as high as I can

I know it sounds like a lot of stuff to do; but it’s not. It takes me about 10min and between some of that I’m getting the bar, putting my initial weights on etc etc…

If the pain doesn’t go away with this and maybe de-loading for a week, maybe you’ve got a good excuse for some ART or a massage?

Good luck!

[quote]dianab wrote:
If you are going to punish yourself with German Volume Training, it’d be best to learn some mobility drills and invest in a foam roller, as previously mentioned. 10x10 at working weight is not going to be easier on your hips then regular sets.[/quote]

That must be what Todd is doing. I ran into him at the gym last night and I just about fell over when he said we did 10x10 at deads. Almost sounds like a killer volume I may want to try.

[quote]Oleena wrote:
No to both.

Edit: I do some core activation activation, but I’m guessing that’s not related to what you’re getting at.[/quote]

First thing you should do is buy a foam roller.

Second thing you should do is buy Magnificent Mobility.

It won’t happen over night but if you are religious with your rolling, mobility and even throw in some static stretching pre-bed, you can open up your hips.

It took me almost 4 months to get some mobility in mine but now mine feel amazing.

[quote]Oleena wrote:

Has anyone else noticed this? Is it a symptom of doing it wrong?

[/quote]

Read this, then check your form.

There is a link to Part 1 at the top of the page, so read that first.

I think the bottom line with this issue is just getting used to the lift. You can do as much prehab mobility work as you want, and checking form can be benificial (I would get someone experienced to watch you and give pointers) but if you’ve only been lifting heavy for 3 months, I presume that this isn’t strain/overuse issue, but rather a physical lack of training experience. That being said you should listen to your body. Backing off lower reps for a while to allow for a fuller recovery may be benificial, but the only thing that will get you used to lifting heavy, is lifting heavy.

Also, when performing reps for deadlifts like you’re thinking of for GVT, do not use the “touch and go” technique. Many DL injuries happen from this as ur form deteriorates horribly and the bar comes forward every rep. Stop the bar on the ground, pause, then lift again, or stand up between reps without the bar. If you post a vid of ur DL I’m sure we could give u a better answer though.

I just wanted to let you all know that I did the GVT with deadlift yesterday and my hips didn’t hurt/feel weird at all during or after. It was a freaking brutal workout, and I missed reps near the end, but the hip sensation didn’t occur. It’s definitely a heavy-lift issue.

I do need to mobilize my hips and work on rolling. The only thing that felt weird (although it didn’t hurt) was a vertebrae in my middle lower back, and I would bet lots of money that it was because I was consciously trying to get my hips low with each rep, and due to lack of flexibility was probably rounding my back near the bottom a little to get the depth while going down (although it was straight going up. I’m very careful about pinching my shoulders back and keeping my back straight).

I was watching my form afterwards in double mirrors, and by widening my stance slightly I can solve the above problem.

How do you deadlift? Conventional or sumo? Having pulled both ways conventional is what I like now. It seems to not aggravate the hips as much.

[quote]Super_Star wrote:
How do you deadlift? Conventional or sumo? Having pulled both ways conventional is what I like now. It seems to not aggravate the hips as much.[/quote]

Conventional. I was planning on working on sumo this upcoming month though.

[quote]Oleena wrote:
Super_Star wrote:
How do you deadlift? Conventional or sumo? Having pulled both ways conventional is what I like now. It seems to not aggravate the hips as much.

Conventional. I was planning on working on sumo this upcoming month though.
[/quote]

I just glanced at your profile and you’re a personal trainer? Now I feel compelled to ask you what your qualifications are and how is it that you help clients when they hit roadblocks. Are you employed at a gym?

[quote]Super_Star wrote:
Oleena wrote:
Super_Star wrote:
How do you deadlift? Conventional or sumo? Having pulled both ways conventional is what I like now. It seems to not aggravate the hips as much.

Conventional. I was planning on working on sumo this upcoming month though.

I just glanced at your profile and you’re a personal trainer? Now I feel compelled to ask you what your qualifications are and how is it that you help clients when they hit roadblocks. Are you employed at a gym?[/quote]

I’ve been wondering the same thing. I think it might serve you well to spend less time trolling the forums and more time reading the articles! I would start with EVERYTHING by Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson! I’m sure other people have their own favorite authors but those are my two favorites.

[quote]sbmart2 wrote:
Super_Star wrote:
Oleena wrote:
Super_Star wrote:
How do you deadlift? Conventional or sumo? Having pulled both ways conventional is what I like now. It seems to not aggravate the hips as much.

Conventional. I was planning on working on sumo this upcoming month though.

I just glanced at your profile and you’re a personal trainer? Now I feel compelled to ask you what your qualifications are and how is it that you help clients when they hit roadblocks. Are you employed at a gym?

I’ve been wondering the same thing. I think it might serve you well to spend less time trolling the forums and more time reading the articles! I would start with EVERYTHING by Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson! I’m sure other people have their own favorite authors but those are my two favorites.
[/quote]

I’m certified through the ISSA and I have been reading everything I can get my hands on. I have numerous book recommendations I’ve been tracking down and reading, I read as many articles on here as I can find, etc That’s why I’m on here :slight_smile: I’ve also been talking with fellow trainers, training with fellow trainers, and training my ass off.

My big question is how do you search this site for articles on specific topics without also getting a bunch of threads where your average Joe is talking about the topic?

[quote]Super_Star wrote:
Oleena wrote:
Super_Star wrote:
How do you deadlift? Conventional or sumo? Having pulled both ways conventional is what I like now. It seems to not aggravate the hips as much.

Conventional. I was planning on working on sumo this upcoming month though.

I just glanced at your profile and you’re a personal trainer? Now I feel compelled to ask you what your qualifications are and how is it that you help clients when they hit roadblocks. Are you employed at a gym?[/quote]

The clients that I get are massively out of shape and don’t require a Thib to train. They simply require the basics, an understanding of how to hit all of the muscles in a structured fashion, periodize a program, manage a diet, and understand how to intelligently continue to benefit from cardio.

Most of them don’t even have the coordination to begin to pull off a deadlift when I meet them.

How do I get them through road blocks? Well, so far I haven’t run into a road block. They are all gaining strength by the week, improving coordination by leaps and bounds every time I work with them, and I’m periodizing their cardio and weight training so they don’t hit plateaus. No one has stopped loosing weight or gain muscle yet.

If I do run into a plateau, I will be talking with the head trainer at my gym, and consulting all of the numerous resources available to me.

And that’s also why I ask for detailed explanations on here if someone recommends something. I will have to explain it in the future, so I need as much data as possible