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HIIT Full Body Weight Workout

This thread will highlight the trails and challenges encountered on my path towards lower body fat, and substantial muscle gain. Starting weight 360 lbs, current weight 340lbs. You may search my profile for baseline body info, and soon to be added pictures. Since first posting this thread I have found a HIIT full body weight workout routine with the helpfull advise of many here in T-Nation. Your are welcome to stop in to see my progress…

Goals:

My long term goals are to loss body fat and get to single digit % body fat. And too increase muscle size at an accelerated but healthy pace.

My short term goal is to get to between 25-30% body fat by my 45th birthday in mid September. Bench press goal is 250 lbs, deadlift 275 lbs

My diet is dialed in pretty tight with very little deviation away from a balanced diet with wholesome foods. I allow myself to sway from the diet only when I am in a social setting and food choices are limited to the food provided or selected from the healthiest choice on the menu.

Hey, welcome.

Here are some articles that should help you get started.

Refined Physique Transformation
http://www.T-Nation.com/article/bodybuilding/refined_physique_transformation&cr=

Training for Newbies, Part 1 and 2
http://www.T-Nation.com/article/bodybuilding/training_for_newbies_part_1&cr=
http://www.T-Nation.com/article/bodybuilding/training_for_newbies_part_2&cr=

Nutrition for Newbies, Part 1 and 2
http://www.T-Nation.com/article/bodybuilding/nutrition_for_newbies_part_1&cr=
http://www.T-Nation.com/article/bodybuilding/nutrition_for_newbies_part_2&cr=

And here’s a link to an exercise library that should help you figure out what an exercise is supposed to look like.

www.criticalbench.com/exercises/exercises.htm

Good luck!

Read Starting Strength 2nd edition. An amazing book worth every penny!

Sailorchris:
Mad props to you for picking up the torch to get in shape. Keep in mind through your trials that progress will not always be quick and easy, so do not get discouraged.

I am a bit anti-cardio so I will not address that issue. But in the beginning I wouldn’t put focus on biceps. Do back workouts and that will stimulate them.

Squats, Deadlifts, Chin/Pull ups (Assisted or not), Bench Press, Military Press. These should be your core lifts.

If you start a program and your thinking “wait that is way too much” don’t stress it. Just do part of it, then each week try to add more to it until you can do it all.

Best of luck!

[quote]yasser wrote:
Sailorchris:
Mad props to you for picking up the torch to get in shape. Keep in mind through your trials that progress will not always be quick and easy, so do not get discouraged.

I am a bit anti-cardio so I will not address that issue. But in the beginning I wouldn’t put focus on biceps. Do back workouts and that will stimulate them.

Squats, Deadlifts, Chin/Pull ups (Assisted or not), Bench Press, Military Press. These should be your core lifts.

If you start a program and your thinking “wait that is way too much” don’t stress it. Just do part of it, then each week try to add more to it until you can do it all.

Best of luck![/quote]

In your current state lat pulldowns done correctly will be great until you can do a chinup.

Thanks for the article links. There is a great deal of info to help me onto the next step.

[quote]yasser wrote:
Sailorchris:
Mad props to you for picking up the torch to get in shape. Keep in mind through your trials that progress will not always be quick and easy, so do not get discouraged.

I am a bit anti-cardio so I will not address that issue. But in the beginning I wouldn’t put focus on biceps. Do back workouts and that will stimulate them.

Squats, Deadlifts, Chin/Pull ups (Assisted or not), Bench Press, Military Press. These should be your core lifts.

If you start a program and your thinking “wait that is way too much” don’t stress it. Just do part of it, then each week try to add more to it until you can do it all.

Best of luck![/quote]

Hey Yasser,

I am starting the HIIT tomorrow. Although I am a pretty big guy, my core strength has always been fairly good. I can do about 10 pullups. I’m waiting for some new weights to come in to start deadlifts and squats.

Your advise to do what I can and build upon this is great. I was a bit concerned that if i follow the HIIT program and can’t do enough of it to make it a worthwhile then I would be missing out on doing other workouts that might be better suited for me to meet my goals. My next objective is to be at 10% body fat by my 45th Birthday in September. I have a good way to go and need to make sure my workouts maximize fat burn.

I’ve been dialing in the diet the last month utilizing a reduced calorie meal plan, ironically, it is pretty close to the one Thibaudeau advocates in his diet recommendations. The diet is undergoing some fine tooning as it relates to fats, and calorie counts. Since the beginning of the year I’ve been restricting calories to between 1,500 - 2,000 calories. I’m uping this to 2,500 - 2,800 calories. I’ve been feeling a bit run down at the end of the day particularly after a good workout. I know I dont have enough fuel in the tank.

Keep a food log and track your calories.

You don’t have to do this everyday even for a few days in the week for everything you put in your mouth and you’ll probably learn alot. I did this last week to just review my intake and was suprised how many carbs I was taking.

And drink a shitload of water.

[quote]joshjuk wrote:
Read Starting Strength 2nd edition. An amazing book worth every penny![/quote]

This is less expensive, but just as valuable:

As much as I love this program and recommend it to everyone, I don’t think its for you. Yet.

Yes, the program is for beginner’s. You would fall into that category. However, it is very intense and taxing on your body. I don’t think you’re there yet. I’m not sure what you have access to , but bodyweight squats (at 325 will be difficult) and bodyweight lunges could work wonders for you.

Keep in mind, this is caloric intake for your current weight. As you decrease, you will obviously need to eat less.

These results will help you to know how many calories you need to maintain your current weight, and the number of calories needed per day to achieve your goal weight in a healthy, steady manner.

You need 3566.1 calories per day to maintain your current weight without exercise.

You need 2806.8 calories per day to reach your goal weight slowly and maintain that weight without exercise.

If you reduce your current caloric intake to 3066.1 calories per day you will lose one pound per week without exercise.

If you increase your current caloric intake to 4066.1 calories per day, you will gain one pound per week.

Exercise and Calorie Needs

If you exercise for 30 minutes each day, you may increase your caloric intake to 3931.7 calories per day and still maintain your current weight.

If you exercise for 60 minutes each day, you may increase your caloric intake to 4397 calories per day to maintain your current weight.

If you exercise for 30 minutes each day, you will be able to reach your goal weight with 3088.8 calories per day.

If you exercise for 60 minutes each day, you will be able to reach your goal weight with 3447.8 calories per day.

[quote]TheDudeAbides wrote:
Keep in mind, this is caloric intake for your current weight. As you decrease, you will obviously need to eat less.

These results will help you to know how many calories you need to maintain your current weight, and the number of calories needed per day to achieve your goal weight in a healthy, steady manner.

You need 3566.1 calories per day to maintain your current weight without exercise.

You need 2806.8 calories per day to reach your goal weight slowly and maintain that weight without exercise.

If you reduce your current caloric intake to 3066.1 calories per day you will lose one pound per week without exercise.

If you increase your current caloric intake to 4066.1 calories per day, you will gain one pound per week.

Exercise and Calorie Needs

If you exercise for 30 minutes each day, you may increase your caloric intake to 3931.7 calories per day and still maintain your current weight.

If you exercise for 60 minutes each day, you may increase your caloric intake to 4397 calories per day to maintain your current weight.

If you exercise for 30 minutes each day, you will be able to reach your goal weight with 3088.8 calories per day.

If you exercise for 60 minutes each day, you will be able to reach your goal weight with 3447.8 calories per day.[/quote]

Hey TheDudeAbides:

I have been tracking my daily diet and micro-nutrients for the last month using the pc version of fitday, and for about a month before that using their free online version. At the beginning of the year I had cut back my overall daily calories to 1,500 - 2,000 calories per day. My diet is very balanced using the ABS diet as a guide.

I can feel the lack of energy this low calorie intake has on me so I’m increasing the calorie count to 2,500 - 2,800 calories a day. And after reviewing Thibs nutrition article I’m adjusting the diet to include more good fats. Another thing I will be adding is more suppliments. I currently dont take any other then the occassional whey protein my son uses when he’s home (he plays college football).

On the workout side, I will start the HIIT training program today. I dont suspect that I’ll be able to go through the entire workout routine with all the reps, especially the X 15 sets, but i should be able to due 65-75% percent of the program and i can adjust from there.

holy shit you can do 10 pullups? huge props to you man. 325 pounds is some serious weight to chin.

work on proper form

i have seen guys weigh 160 be able to do a ton of weight because of their perfect form as opposed to guys that weigh 250 and have shitty form, this will pay off in the end.

you will shed a lot of weight if you up fat intake along with protein intake and keep carbs at a ceiling of 50 g per day.

water
vegetables
lean meat
eggs
milk

these are my best friends

[quote]Jacked Diesel wrote:
work on proper form

i have seen guys weigh 160 be able to do a ton of weight because of their perfect form as opposed to guys that weigh 250 and have shitty form, this will pay off in the end.

you will shed a lot of weight if you up fat intake along with protein intake and keep carbs at a ceiling of 50 g per day.

water
vegetables
lean meat
eggs
milk

these are my best friends

[/quote]

After reading your post I went and did a count of my carbs for the last 14 days. I’m averaging 16.5g a day. 9.5g of protein, and 5g of fats (12% Saturated). The averaged daily calorie intake count over the 14 days was 1,990.

3 hardboiled eggs every morning/or two instant oatmeal packages
mucho veggies at lunch and dinner
not so much milk (i love it but my kids demolish it before i can usually get any)
Meat - Not to much lean; I’m the son of a butcher so i eat Rib Eye Steak (Prime Rib section of the cow), Fillet Minion one meal a week, and chicken breast is a dinner staple 4/5 nights a week.
I also eat fish three to four times a week often for lunch in a salad. I’d eat it more often but no one else in my family likes fish.

My current diet is a far cry from the drive thru hamburgers and pizza I ate for at least 50-60% of my meals for the last decade. Ninety days ago I didnt have a clue what my calorie intake was (5,000 - 8,000 calories), what the breakdown was, and how it impacted my overall weight and fitness. Dang, I’m glad i found T-Nation, the fitday program, and a little book called the ABS Diet. These things and some work in the gym have changed my outlook on my physical condition, and helped me to set physique goals. Thanks for your input.

[quote]zephead4747 wrote:
holy shit you can do 10 pullups? huge props to you man. 325 pounds is some serious weight to chin.[/quote]

I’ve been over 275lbs for at least 10 years. I also have a son who plays college football (Division I) and have helped him train (spot) since he was a young teenager. I usually took a couple of reps after he was done just fooling around. I really never trained, but I think this helped with strength. We also made a game out of running a fun obsticle course at a local park which has core work “obsticles”. We still run this course and have been doing it now for 7/8 years, and he didnt start to beat me until he was in his freshman year in HS. I had to always beat him in push ups and pullups when he was younger when he did catch up I simply increased the raised push ups and the pullups by an extra 5. So even though I’ve not trained in an organized fashion recently I did get some workouts fun workouts in.

I also used to train hard when I raced motocross semi-professionlly as a young adult.

[quote]hardgnr wrote:
Keep a food log and track your calories.

You don’t have to do this everyday even for a few days in the week for everything you put in your mouth and you’ll probably learn alot. I did this last week to just review my intake and was suprised how many carbs I was taking.

And drink a shitload of water.[/quote]

Yeah, your right. I started tracking my diet around the beginning of the year for every meal, anything that goes into my pie-hole gets accounted for. Man the first week was an eye opener. I had no idea the amount of pure shit I was consuming. The fat content in just one meal I would eat on a regular basis could stop a raging bull in mid stride. Fast food places should be illegal.

I started using the free fitday.com diet tracker and have since purchased the PC version and have been using it and all the features. If your not familiar with this program it has diet and excersize tracking, metabolism breakdown, micro-nutrient tracking, measurement tracking, and dozens of reports that help you define how your progressing towards your goals.

I’m not affilited with the company but its worth the free online version, and I paid under $20.00 for the pc version.

[quote]I started using the free fitday.com diet tracker and have since purchased the PC version and have been using it and all the features. If your not familiar with this program it has diet and excersize tracking, metabolism breakdown, micro-nutrient tracking, measurement tracking, and dozens of reports that help you define how your progressing towards your goals.

I’m not affilited with the company but its worth the free online version, and I paid under $20.00 for the pc version. [/quote]

So is the PC version worth the extra cash? I already love using the website.

Holy crap! I can do maybe 5 and I weigh 235/240. Nice! (or I suck)

My diet is my weakest link (that and my pullups) I can’t offer any advice here.

Without fail everytime I design a new training program I find something new I want to do on this site.

Something weird happened to my post.

[quote]TheDudeAbides wrote:
I started using the free fitday.com diet tracker and have since purchased the PC version and have been using it and all the features. If your not familiar with this program it has diet and excersize tracking, metabolism breakdown, micro-nutrient tracking, measurement tracking, and dozens of reports that help you define how your progressing towards your goals.

I’m not affilited with the company but its worth the free online version, and I paid under $20.00 for the pc version.

So is the PC version worth the extra cash? I already love using the website.[/quote]

Yeah, I think it is. There are more features, mainly reports, which are helpful, and you can use a daily log. I also like the food log better. I paid $19.95. The purchase area says 29 or 39 dollars but the there is a banner at the top of several pages on the site that say purchase pc version for 19 bucks.

[quote]yasser wrote:

I’m 44 '5 11" and 325lbs.

I can do about 10 pullups…

Holy crap! I can do maybe 5 and I weigh 235/240. Nice! (or I suck)

I’ve been dialing in the diet

My diet is my weakest link (that and my pullups) I can’t offer any advice here.

I was a bit concerned that if i follow the HIIT program and can’t do enough of it to make it a worthwhile

Without fail everytime I design a new training program I find something new I want to do on this site.

Something weird happened to my post.[/quote]

Dude you dont need to tell me anything about diet being a weak link. Before the beginning of the year I think my daily caloric intake exceeded 6,000 calories on most day. Over the holidays i looked for and found a diet and fitness tracking system fitday.com and started using it. After 2/3 days the darn thing showed me in live living color what my cappy eating habits where putting into my body. This thing also breaks down protein, carbs, and fats (it measures all three types of fats). I started entering into the system every morsal of anything that went into my mouth. After that 3rd day I went through my pantry, threw out every piece of non-wheat, non whole grain, unhealthy food stuff. I also used to eat out at fast food twice a day during the week. I can count on one hand how many times i’ve eaten away from home since i started tracking this stuff in early January.

If you want to trip your weak link look at every thing you eat on a daily basis. Not what it was (burrito/hamburger/steak etc.) but what micro-nutrients were in the food, good or bad, and this will force you to think about what you eat way before you eat. I’ve never meal planned anything in my life. Now I plan out my daily meals for the week on the weekend, and i’ve even gone so far as to coordinate dinner planning with my wife so i can eat good solid meals throughout the day. Knowing what is going into my body has also kept me from eating any junk food. This wasnt really a problem for me (I always had more struggles with food volume) but I would eat junk food if it was sitting around. We still have some stuff like chips and puddings for the kids but i havent touched the stuff in two months.