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High Rep Front Squats?

I heard from somewhere that front squats should be done at no more than 5 or 6 reps per set. Can anyone confirm this? If it’s true, why is it that you should only do low reps for front squats? If it helps, I use the bodybuilder style of grip for front squats since my wrists aren’t flexible enough for the Olympic style.

Because most people’s rhomboids fatigue early so they become kyphotic (hunchback) at about the 6th rep. I would recommend to get the flexibilty in your wrists so that when you feel your upper back bending you can drive your elbows up, plus if you want to do olympic lifting you will get used to the position. But you might want to see if its your tris and back that maybe aren’t flexible either.

I, personally, don’t do high rep sets because the bar restricts my breathing, which I think is kinda important.

I know a guy who calls them man-makers. We did a 25 rep set of front squats and that 135 lbs made both me and my training partner collapse.

[quote]malonetd wrote:
I, personally, don’t do high rep sets because the bar restricts my breathing, which I think is kinda important.[/quote]

A little hypoxia never killed anyone. Stuff like high rep front squats are good for mental toughness more than anything else.

Start out super light. Even an empty , may be just 10 lbs on each side. Make progress slowly. Eventually, as you slowly increase the weight to keep the reps high, you will be very proud of your self.

I was on a rescue job, going up and down steep sand & clay banks/cliffs repeatedly. I was going up and smiling to my self how well the high rep squats made possible.

It really is worth the time & effort to get there.

Thanks guys for the responses. I want to do some high rep squat work and I prefer front squats to back squats, so that is why I was asking. Since front squats seem okay, I’ll give them a try.

Any advice on how to get flexible enough hold the bar in the Olympic fashion?

A good trick is to use lifting straps.Hook them around the bar and hold the ends of them to get the elbows in position.It takes practice to get the flexiblity.Stay light at the start and perfect the technique.

Go for it it make a man out of you or leave ya crying like a baby maybe both, Its good stuff from time to time for sure

Phill

[quote]bluestreets wrote:
Thanks guys for the responses. I want to do some high rep squat work and I prefer front squats to back squats, so that is why I was asking. Since front squats seem okay, I’ll give them a try.

Any advice on how to get flexible enough hold the bar in the Olympic fashion?[/quote]

I used straps. Afterwards I’d do a wall sit for as long as I could (bodybuilding pendulum.) Tough work.

I just don’t see the point of doing high rep squats. If you’re doing 20 plus reps you’re basically doing an aerobic workout.

Who’s going to get more gains, lifter A doing 20+ rep front squats with 135 or lifter B doing 5 sets of 5 or 5 sets of 6-8 with a much much heavier weight? Sometimes people delude themselves on what working hard is. Heavy weight is key.

Here are some suggestions on flexibility. When I first got to college our Strength and Conditioning Coach made everyone front squat. We developed the felxibilty two ways. One he told us to stretch our hands everyday all day, in class, walking home etc. Just use one hand to pull the other back.

And then another thing was to load the bar up with weight and use a kinda forced stretch to get the forearms there. Hurts like hell but I’ve been able to do them ever since.

[quote]bluestreets wrote:
I heard from somewhere that front squats should be done at no more than 5 or 6 reps per set. Can anyone confirm this? If it’s true, why is it that you should only do low reps for front squats? If it helps, I use the bodybuilder style of grip for front squats since my wrists aren’t flexible enough for the Olympic style.[/quote]

Yes that is true about the 6 reps, I think Poliquin said that.

Also, my wrists weren’t flexible enough, stick with it. Now I can do it right.

I get migraines from high rep squats of any type.