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High-Protein Diet Danger

Hello All,
I came across this in Bottom line’s daily health news. Please let me know what you think.
Thanks,
-D

High-Protein Diet Danger

Youâ??ll probably lose weight if you follow a popular type of diet thatâ??s low in carbs and high in protein – but will you lose health, too? The controversy surrounding this type of eating plan is loud and seemingly endless, and here comes more research stirring that pot with a startling new finding about cardiovascular health.

The study started out as a straightforward effort to determine whether a low- carb/high-protein diet is healthful, says its senior author Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, director of cardiovascular research at the CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Mice bred to have atherosclerosis were fed one of three diets for 12 weeks. One group ate a standard mouse chow with 65% carbohydrates, 15% fat and 20% protein …another group ate an approximation of the typical Western human diet with 43% carbs, 42% fat and 15% protein… and a third group ate an approximation of a typical human low-carb/high-protein weight loss diet with 12% carbs, 43% fat and 45% protein.

Whatâ??s the Surprise?

Not all the findings were surprising… as expected, the mice in the low-carb/high-protein group put on less weight as they matured than those on the Western diet, and their markers for vascular disease (including cholesterol and triglyceride levels)… oxidative stress… insulin and glucose levels… as well as some inflammatory cytokine levels were either no different or slightly better. So far so good… but the researchers got a big surprise when they examined the blood vessels themselves: The low-carb/high-protein eating mice had far more atherosclerosis as measured by plaque accumulation than the mice in the Western diet group.

Uh-oh – this could be big news for human dieters, so now the researchers had to try to find an explanation for this unexpected and worrisome finding. Since none of the standard vascular health markers (the things your doctor checks at your annual physical) indicated anything was amiss, the researchers theorized that something might have interfered with the miceâ??s natural ability to repair injuries to vessels and return them to normal function. The team focused on a special bone marrow cell thought to play a role in blood vessel regrowth and injury repair called EPC (endothelial progenitor cells) … and they found that in the low-carb/high-protein group, levels had indeed dropped 40% after only two weeks on the diet.

What does this mean for us non-mice? The study shows a correlation between reduction of the cells and an increase in arterial plaque, Dr. Rosenzweig said – and he believes this may be of great importance. Other studies have demonstrated that people with heart and cardiovascular disease tend to have fewer of these cells and that people who exercise have more of them, so now we must wonder, can a low-carb diet reduce EPC levels and possibly lead to or contribute to serious heart disease? More research is required, as we still donâ??t know whether this would happen in people… but it convinced Dr. Rosenzweig to go off the low-carb diet he was on!

Related Diet News

If youâ??ve been keeping up with reading your Daily Health News, Dr. Rosenzweigâ??s research may remind you of another study, from Mount Sinai Medical School in New York City (Daily Health News, March 9, 2010, “The Brain-Shrinking Diet”). This earlier and unrelated study found brain shrinkage in mice fed a low-carb/high-protein diet – another finding that raises concerns about the potential for harm in such a diet. While itâ??s too early to draw conclusions, the two studies do ring some cautionary bells about diets loaded with protein and light on carbs. As Dr. Rosenzweig says, the best message for now is to stick with “all the things we know are good for us, including a balanced, nutritious diet with lots of fruits and vegetables.” Those are the kinds of carbs we all need to eat anyway.

Source(s):

Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, director of cardiovascular research, CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, Boston.

I’m not a mouse.

I can understand testing medicines and other chemical/hormonal factors on mice seeing as they have similar endocrine systems and genetic coding to humans HOWEVER, in regards to diet ratios:

  1. Mice have very different body mass ratios in comparison to humans
  2. Mice have much different metabolic rates in comparison to humans due to different activity
  3. Quality, source of foods, and high intensity exercise etc. are variables not accounted for

Anecdotal evidence suggests (to me personally) that the bodybuilder-esque diet is a healthier lifestyle. As nice as animal research is, it can fail, especially when testing something on such a grand scale such as macronutrient ratios.

Once again, I’m not a mouse.

[quote]denetl wrote:
Hello All,
I came across this in Bottom line’s daily health news. Please let me know what you think.
Thanks,
-D

High-Protein Diet Danger

You̢??ll probably lose weight if you follow a popular type of diet that̢??s low in carbs and high in protein Рbut will you lose health, too? The controversy surrounding this type of eating plan is loud and seemingly endless, and here comes more research stirring that pot with a startling new finding about cardiovascular health.

The study started out as a straightforward effort to determine whether a low- carb/high-protein diet is healthful, says its senior author Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, director of cardiovascular research at the CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Mice bred to have atherosclerosis were fed one of three diets for 12 weeks. One group ate a standard mouse chow with 65% carbohydrates, 15% fat and 20% protein …another group ate an approximation of the typical Western human diet with 43% carbs, 42% fat and 15% protein… and a third group ate an approximation of a typical human low-carb/high-protein weight loss diet with 12% carbs, 43% fat and 45% protein.

Whatâ??s the Surprise?

Not all the findings were surprising… as expected, the mice in the low-carb/high-protein group put on less weight as they matured than those on the Western diet, and their markers for vascular disease (including cholesterol and triglyceride levels)… oxidative stress… insulin and glucose levels… as well as some inflammatory cytokine levels were either no different or slightly better. So far so good… but the researchers got a big surprise when they examined the blood vessels themselves: The low-carb/high-protein eating mice had far more atherosclerosis as measured by plaque accumulation than the mice in the Western diet group.

Uh-oh – this could be big news for human dieters, so now the researchers had to try to find an explanation for this unexpected and worrisome finding. Since none of the standard vascular health markers (the things your doctor checks at your annual physical) indicated anything was amiss, the researchers theorized that something might have interfered with the miceâ??s natural ability to repair injuries to vessels and return them to normal function. The team focused on a special bone marrow cell thought to play a role in blood vessel regrowth and injury repair called EPC (endothelial progenitor cells) … and they found that in the low-carb/high-protein group, levels had indeed dropped 40% after only two weeks on the diet.

What does this mean for us non-mice? The study shows a correlation between reduction of the cells and an increase in arterial plaque, Dr. Rosenzweig said – and he believes this may be of great importance. Other studies have demonstrated that people with heart and cardiovascular disease tend to have fewer of these cells and that people who exercise have more of them, so now we must wonder, can a low-carb diet reduce EPC levels and possibly lead to or contribute to serious heart disease? More research is required, as we still donâ??t know whether this would happen in people… but it convinced Dr. Rosenzweig to go off the low-carb diet he was on!

Related Diet News

If youâ??ve been keeping up with reading your Daily Health News, Dr. Rosenzweigâ??s research may remind you of another study, from Mount Sinai Medical School in New York City (Daily Health News, March 9, 2010, “The Brain-Shrinking Diet”). This earlier and unrelated study found brain shrinkage in mice fed a low-carb/high-protein diet – another finding that raises concerns about the potential for harm in such a diet. While itâ??s too early to draw conclusions, the two studies do ring some cautionary bells about diets loaded with protein and light on carbs. As Dr. Rosenzweig says, the best message for now is to stick with “all the things we know are good for us, including a balanced, nutritious diet with lots of fruits and vegetables.” Those are the kinds of carbs we all need to eat anyway.

Source(s):

Anthony Rosenzweig, MD, director of cardiovascular research, CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, Boston.[/quote]

I think you should have used the search function before posting, as this topic has already been thoroughly discussed.

Additionally, your picture scares me.

[quote]denetl wrote:
Please let me know what you think.[/quote]

I didn’t look at the actual study, but I think it’s dangerous to try to draw any conclusions from a single study on rodents.

More research is required.

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:
I think you should have used the search function before posting, as this topic has already been thoroughly discussed.

Additionally, your picture scares me.[/quote]

Why? Because it comes across as a wee bit GAY?

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:
I think you should have used the search function before posting, as this topic has already been thoroughly discussed.

Additionally, your picture scares me.[/quote]

Why? Because it comes across as a wee bit GAY?

[/quote]

Bingo. Glad were on the same page ID.

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

[quote]WestCoast7 wrote:
I think you should have used the search function before posting, as this topic has already been thoroughly discussed.

Additionally, your picture scares me.[/quote]

Why? Because it comes across as a wee bit GAY?

[/quote]

Bingo. Glad were on the same page ID.[/quote]

^^whats worse (about the avatar) is that there is about a 99% chance that its not even him lol. thats what makes it a little less than hetero

As with any science, there are things you just can’t account for, but seriously (and I am just rehashing from other threads):

  1. Humans are not mice. Not only is the metabolism a factor, but whats more, most humans aren’t genetically picked to develop atherosclerosis. All this study really tells you is that in mice that have been genetically picked, you may find a difference in how fast that atherosclerosis occurs.

  2. There are so many confounding variables. How much exercise did the mice get? Was it assumed that all mice that we’re bred to develop atherosclerosis developed it at the same rate? And these mice, bred to develop athero, were also bred to eat standard chow. Isn’t that confounding? I could go on…

  3. Even on this site we have proof that high protein diets and proper exercise IN HUMANS works to drop not only body fat, but various biomarkers that help us to determine risk of athero and other disease. Just ask Dan John and Dave Tate.

…Too bored to write more, but you catch my drift. I’m sure it was an interesting study. But it has little relevance to people, unless they plan to scale it up to more “human-like” animals.

When we, like mice, start producing vitamin C let me know so I can give a shit about what happens to mice on a diet… Also, when we actually have “knockout” humans let me know too, we are not rats/mice. Also, humans are much more complex. There are too many variables to consider.

Mice are good for psychologists who like to pick the brains of something legally, and for scientists who want to tell the world what happened to mice that will surely happen to humans (anyone ever try to stick the ‘square’ through the ‘square’, it worked right. Ever try putting the square in the circle?)

Anyone else wondering how they managed to feed mice a typical western diet?

Did they take them out to Denny’s and stuff, or what?

  1. This has been discussed to death. There is no ground to stand on as there has never been a study researching the effects of high-protein diets on healthy humans. There have been a few completed on giving high protein diets to people with mid- to late-stage renal failure, but that obviously doesn’t apply to healthy individuals.

  2. That article is one of the shittiest examples of journalism I have ever seen. Whoever wrote that needs to have their hands chopped off and their tongue sliced out so that they may never make something so awful again.

1.) This alone throws a huge wrench into any attempt to extrapolate this study. Is it really surprising that mice bread to have a disease developed it?

2.) Also, if all the “traditional markers” were “just as good or slightly better” but didn’t actually mean dick, why are we using them? See point 1.

3.) We know that different fats and proteins can have wildly different effects on health. I doubt the mice got beef and fish oil. Which would probably fuck up a mouse because it’s not what they would normally eat. Just like I’m not supposed to chew off the corners of cereal boxes and ramen noodle packages.

For the last time there is no danger with high protein diets. Sheesh.

[quote]forbes wrote:
For the last time there is no danger with high protein diets. Sheesh. [/quote]

Everyone who eats high protein diets will die.

Eventually.

[quote]Xab wrote:

  1. This has been discussed to death. There is no ground to stand on as there has never been a study researching the effects of high-protein diets on healthy humans. [/quote]

Well, if you take into account that bodybuilders have been eating high protein diets for decades that should be equivalent to a study imo. And the pulling calcium from bones theory doesn’t add up. With all the protein they eat the heavy weights they lift should shatter their bones.

Our eyes are in the front of our heads like every other predator. Our teeth are pretty sharp. Eat meat and lots of it (insert joke)

[quote]dnlcdstn wrote:

[quote]Xab wrote:

  1. This has been discussed to death. There is no ground to stand on as there has never been a study researching the effects of high-protein diets on healthy humans. [/quote]

Well, if you take into account that bodybuilders have been eating high protein diets for decades that should be equivalent to a study imo. And the pulling calcium from bones theory doesn’t add up. With all the protein they eat the heavy weights they lift should shatter their bones.

Our eyes are in the front of our heads like every other predator. Our teeth are pretty sharp. Eat meat and lots of it (personally, I prefer large portions of tube steak) [/quote]

^^^Good but not great. We’re looking for something over the top here.

All those who are worried about the protein in their diets please send me your unwanted steak, chicken, eggs, protein powder etc and I will be sure to dispose of it safely.