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High Frequency vs High Volume... Again


#1

What is better !

What i mean is, what is scientifically better for Hypertrophy.

Hitting the muscles 2 or more times per week with a moderate to low volume (10sets per bodypart per session). I mean your recovery seem to suffer on these, but training frequently means faster results right? What about TUT?

Or

Hitting the muscle every 7 days with high volume (20+ sets per bodypart) to increase the TUT. I learned that the more you get the TUT, the more you shock the muscles and get bigger hypertrophy.
So instead of doing an upper lower split and doing (example of upper day) a push then a pull, and again a push and a pull, all of maybe 5x10 per excercise, you stop the TUT between the musclegroup, why not 20sets of chest excersises?

What are your opinions, what are you doing?

Is it different when you are Natty or on Roids?

There are several articles that talks for both sides.

I didnt find any right awnser, or maybe there isn`t.

I am wondering what you think.


#2

First comes frequency. However many sessions per week, adding more workouts. In the beginning, the extra stuff may be really easy. Like “recovery” stuff. Or “conditioning.” Again, this can start easy. Walking for 30 minutes twice a week. Your main workouts stay the same, and you do more extra stuff to prepare for, then recover from them.

The extra stuff gradually evolves into real work. So the frequency is up. Figure out how to structure your training so you can get the extra sessions in every week, without killing your “real” workouts.

Then start squeezing more sets into each session, increasing the volume. And keep adding volume, without hurting yourself. Make sure your “main lifts” are still the focus. Keep them progressing. Don’t do so much that you need to miss sessions. 20 sets may be a lot for chest. Maybe 10 sets for chest. Then 10 for lats. And 10 for upper back. And 10 for triceps. And a few for traps and rear delts.

For the real, true story of a pretty solid lifter turning into a Mastadon SuperFreak, Check out “Farmer’s Log” in the Training Logs section, by FarmerOwen. Frequency, then volume. Then more frequency and more volume.


#3

I am currently experimenting with switching between high frequency total body training and high volume split routines every 6 months or so.

My thinking is that either method will work until the body adapts to the stimulus, so why not experiment with radically changing the stimulus once progress plateaus.

I don’t see how this can hurt, but I have no evidence yet as to whether it does any good either; I will let you know in a couple of years if I see any significant benefits.


#4

I’ll tend to bend towards medium in both.

Really high frequency training is not for everyone (most of lifters are people with limited time and limited recovery capabilities), but really high volume training is not ideal for most people either (most of the lifters can’t handle/don’t need so much as they’re doing and would be better of doing less but better).

So - both work and both are important, but extremes are something very few people actually need. You can see this in majority of strength programs: 1-3 times a week per movement/bodypart with medium (or little high/little low) volume.

PS. The point made above of slowly increasing your capability to handle frequency/volume is also crucial. That’s why high volume/high frequency programs are something usually suited more advanced lifters.


#5

While I would like to say the more frequently you can train a muscle with adequate volume the faster you’ll see results, there are many other factors which may, in fact, impede progress. This is individual and has much to do with your ability to maintain sufficient levels of intensity and effort in the gym, recovery ability(cns, joints etc) and your own body’s response(which should be measured from your ongoing results).[quote=“Vince_AthAesth, post:1, topic:215995”]
What are your opinions, what are you doing?
[/quote]
2x a week per bodypart except arms(1x per week).[quote=“Vince_AthAesth, post:1, topic:215995”]
Is it different when you are Natty or on Roids?
[/quote]
Again, this is individual. [quote=“Vince_AthAesth, post:1, topic:215995”]
I didnt find any right awnser, or maybe there isn`t.
[/quote]
The right answer is you will have to find out what works for YOU through experimentation and experience. This is a long term endeavor, not a “3 months to getting swole” thing so don’t get anal about minutia that will not make a significant difference in your level of development 3-5 years from now.


#6

The right answer is you will have to find out what works for YOU through experimentation and experience. This is a long term endeavor, not a “3 months to getting swole” thing so don’t get anal about minutia that will not make a significant difference in your level of development 3-5 years from now

Really good post right here.

I see frequency and volume as tools for progression. I have seen how both can be effective and how what is more effective may vary between people or even within the same person at different times. I’ve seen great progress on my deadlift at different times training both twice a week and every 10 days with higher volume. That said, I can’t say I enjoy the process of deadlifting twice a week.

People are always trying to find some kind of idealized methodology for their training protocol, but it’s ultimately a futile pursuit. Not only will you never truly realize what is “optimal”, but what is optimal is not static.

Here’s the way I see it:

  1. Do you have some kind of reasonable progression paradigm in your programming?

  2. Is it working?

If the answer is “yes” to both questions, then you’re on the right track. Pay attention to what you’re doing and why it’s working in order to learn from it and stop worrying about ideals.

In my first month of lifting seriously, an experienced lifter told me one of the wisest things about lifting I’ve ever heard: “it’s a marathon, not a sprint”.


#7

It’s probably not important enough for you to worry about. Nor is the question frequency vs volume, as the 2 methods you laid out in the first post had the same volume. You really seem to be asking “which method of getting in X amount of volume is better?”

Theoretically, I think higher frequency is technically better. I find it easier to get in the volume and most of what I’ve read indicates it generally leads to more hypertrophy. But again, it’s probably not big enough of a difference to care.


#8

Join a team, or sign up for an athletic competition. You’re frquency will go up. And you probably won’t deadlift twice a week.


#9

So many other variables at play here. I’ve personally made gains with both types of training, and eventually settled on something that isn’t extreme volume, nor extreme frequency that worked for ME.

As others have already noted, there is a lot of individual factors to consider, and I don’t just mean your recovery ability. Work or school schedule and how often/much time you can realistically spend training, how much $ you’re willing to drop on food/supps, how hard you’re actually able to train in terms of intensity, injuries etc…

Over the years I’ve been a fan of:
-M/W/F/ split (similar to a Push/Pull/Legs approach)
-M/T/TH/F split each bodypart once each rotation)
-4 days on, 1 off (when I was able to truly dedicate time, and stay on top of my diet and recovery)

You’ll never know if something will work for YOU until you try it and give it enough time to adequately assess. Even then, I don’t think you can realistically say that one is better than the other (volume vs frequency) in terms of stimulating hypertrophy.

S