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High Blood Pressure + Lifting

Sup guys, i took a blood pressure test at a local CVS pharmacy an it came out in these 3 orders at 3 different times. (164, 158, an 169) I know its really high an im only 20 yrs old, 195 lbs an 17% BF.

Im not the unhealthiest guys out there, i eat clean but when i do eat dirty i binge. Its also a genetic thing from my mom. Any advice? Should i lift reguarly still? thanks

bump

Yes

magnesium helped me out a lot. there are other things out there, but keep up the lifting and cardio. eating low carb will lower bp also. probably one of the worst things you could do is stop lifting.

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My BP is still a bit high. I had been on meds for a few years and then lost a lot of weight. I was off meds for a while but as I started lifting heavier and gaining a bit of muscle weight my BP went up. My doctor told me weight is weight and it still puts a strain on the system. Some people are just prone to high BP. Don’t mess around, get it checked. It’s not worth having more problems. Yes, you should still be able to lift. Add a bit of cardio, watch your sodium and caffeine, and drink a lot of fluids.

[quote]stitch0102 wrote:
My BP is still a bit high. I had been on meds for a few years and then lost a lot of weight. I was off meds for a while but as I started lifting heavier and gaining a bit of muscle weight my BP went up. My doctor told me weight is weight and it still puts a strain on the system.

Some people are just prone to high BP. Don’t mess around, get it checked. It’s not worth having more problems. Yes, you should still be able to lift. Add a bit of cardio, watch your sodium and caffeine, and drink a lot of fluids.[/quote]

“weight is weight”; this is crap. This doctor is an idiot.

When you get fat your body creates millions of tinny capillaries to feed and maintain the fat tissue. This is extremely difficult for blood to flow through because they are so small and if you are really fat, you have a lot of them.

So it is like your heart trying to suck a grape seed through a straw. This causes a backup of blood in you vein system and left side of your heart. In turn causing high blood pressure.

On the other had, increased muscle is not the same. Muscle tissue is VERY vascular and blood flows in and out of it very well. The only issue would be making sure your heart can supply the blood when needed as the muscle become bigger and need more 02 and blood supply during exercise.

This is why you need to do some cardio work to help you heart “catch up” to your muscles. Your heart does get stronger by weight training, but IMO, anaerobic training does not develop it to the extent that cardio (aerobic) training does.

So weight is not weight.

Lastly, some people have hypertension from renal issues or other factors. These are the people who need to be careful about sodium and other lifestyle factors including medications. But for someone who does not fit into this sodium sensitive category, sodium is a non-issue.

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[quote]AlteredState wrote:
Lorisco wrote:

“weight is weight”; this is crap. This doctor is an idiot.

When you get fat your body creates millions of tinny arterioles to feed and maintain the fat tissue. This is extremely difficult for blood to flow through because they are so small and if you are really fat, you have a lot of them.

So it is like your heart trying to suck a grape seed through a straw. This causes a backup of blood in you arterial system and left side of your heart. In turn causing high blood pressure.

On the other had, increased muscle is not the same. Muscle tissue is VERY vascular and blood flows in and out of it very well. The only issue would be making sure your heart can supply the blood when needed as the muscle become bigger and need more 02 and blood supply during exercise.

This is why you need to do some cardio work to help you heart “catch up” to your muscles. Your heart does get stronger by weight training, but IMO, anaerobic training does not develop it to the extent that cardio (aerobic) training does.

So weight is not weight.

Lastly, some people have hypertension from renal issues or other factors. These are the people who need to be careful about sodium and other lifestyle factors including medications. But for someone who does not fit into this sodium sensitive category, sodium is a non-issue.
[/quote]

Your edit is incorrect.

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Low carb diet, cardio, eating relatively clean all helped me out big time.

This weight lifting we do is about being healthy, stronger, looking good inside & out. When a bodybuilder can’t walk up a stairway or jog arround the block, somebody is lieing to themself. Their most important muscle(heart) isn’t as shaped up as it needs to be. How far are you driving to a gym to work out? You should be walking 2 to 5 miles a day to do something about the heart & blood pressure. Maybe simply adding in walking to and from the gym could help.

I never stopped lifting weights, and never stopped some form of aerobics, and I am 65.

Dr Cooper of the Cooper clinic has a WWW site that has mountains of proven information. Also he has a radio show on Saturday mornings, that can be heard from his site, and it has a back log of older shows.

Lastly, from GNC I take their Magnesium & Potasssium in an Asportage Base, 3 @ day.

[quote]AlteredState wrote:
Lorisco wrote:
AlteredState wrote:
Lorisco wrote:

“weight is weight”; this is crap. This doctor is an idiot.

When you get fat your body creates millions of tinny arterioles to feed and maintain the fat tissue. This is extremely difficult for blood to flow through because they are so small and if you are really fat, you have a lot of them.

So it is like your heart trying to suck a grape seed through a straw. This causes a backup of blood in you arterial system and left side of your heart. In turn causing high blood pressure.

On the other had, increased muscle is not the same. Muscle tissue is VERY vascular and blood flows in and out of it very well. The only issue would be making sure your heart can supply the blood when needed as the muscle become bigger and need more 02 and blood supply during exercise.

This is why you need to do some cardio work to help you heart “catch up” to your muscles. Your heart does get stronger by weight training, but IMO, anaerobic training does not develop it to the extent that cardio (aerobic) training does.

So weight is not weight.

Lastly, some people have hypertension from renal issues or other factors. These are the people who need to be careful about sodium and other lifestyle factors including medications. But for someone who does not fit into this sodium sensitive category, sodium is a non-issue.

Your edit is incorrect.

How so? The left side of the heart feeds out to the arterial system. If the arteries become constricted (through faulty activation of the RAA system, or chronic stress, etc) then this causes an increase in BP.

Eventually, after much time and attempts by the heart to compensate, the blood backs up in the left ventricle which is unable to contract forcefully enough to eject all the blood. This causes a back up in the pulmonary system and eventually the right side of the heart.

The venous system does not become conjected before the arterial system in nearly all cases of hypertension from what I understand.

So you said:

“So it is like your heart trying to suck a grape seed through a straw. This causes a backup of blood in you venous system and left side of your heart.”

However the heart does not “suck up” anything, since that would imply negative pressure through the venous system into the vena cava. The heart is fed through slight positive pressure, it does not ‘suck’. Your analogy is faulty.

Besdies, the venous system feeds the right side of the heart not the left.

However if I have missed your point, then I’m sorry. Please explain to me what you meant.[/quote]

Wow, very knowledgable. That was a great read! Thanks for the info. I understand Lorisco analogy at the same time though. His info wasn’t totally correct but he made a great point I think.

thanks for all the responses guys, helped alot.

also someone above said i should have a low carb diet, but from what i know (not too much), wont i need alot of carbs to gain mass an keep the hard earned muscle? I have a phobia thinking if i cut carbs out ill lose the hardwork ive put in…so practically i think alot of carbs = musce gain + size