T Nation

High-Bar Squat Form Check

I’ve recently started squatting with a high-bar position due to lack of shoulder mobility and I’m not sure of form yet.

The videos are in my profile because I haven’t been able to upload into a post yet.

Your 82.5x3 looks good on the first 2 reps. On the last rep, your hips and knees rise too quickly and your back bends. You do a semi-bent-back-good-morning for the remainder of the lift. That last rep was potentially dangerous. So, in summary:

Good points:
-Depth
-Knee/hip rising
-Knees not caving in
-Head/spine positioning (first 2 reps)

Bad points on the last rep:
-Rounded back
-Knee/hip rising

Overall good work! Just be careful about how you treat your spine, else you’ll end up broken like me!

I like the bloodhound.

For your squat, hold still!

Seriously, you are bouncing around a bunch before you start the lift, especially in your knees. You need to work on getting a firm base.

First rep was by far the best. (On the final set video, the 2nd set video isn’t working.) After rep one, your knees bend before you break at the hips. That’s common as fatigue sets in, and I’m sure that’s why you do it, but make a mental note to try and make that hip movement the first movement.

It also looks like you are struggling for depth and are a hair high right now. You are sitting back into it well, but you have to remember that at some point you have to sit down, too. Don’t be afraid to let your knees drift forward and your butt drop down to get that last inch or two. As you do that, you will really want to make sure that you are forcing your knees out and maintaining a good arch. Forcing your knees out helps promote that arch.

The poster before me makes a good observation, but I wouldn’t be overly worried about it. That sort of form on the way up is very common with raw, beltless lifters. It is the result of both fatigue and your body putting you into the most mechanically advantageous position by shortening the distance between the bar and your hips. It is not good form, and yes, it does put you at greater risk of injury. For now, cut the reps short before you get to that point. As you gain more experience, you will be able to judge for yourself how much risk you are putting yourself in, and can decide if you want to squeeze out the extra rep like that.

Thanks for your help guys, I’ll put up another couple of videos next Monday. I’ll keep in mind what you guys said and I’ll try to stop before my form goes all wonky. When watching the video I did notice my back go kinda funny that final rep.

I’ll work on getting solidly in place before I squat.

I think the depth thing is because I’m so used to squatting low-bar, with lighter weight I can get my ass to my calves, but when I’m squatting with heavy(er) weights I feel like I’ve hit rock-bottom long before I have. That will probably come with remembering to sit down rather than just back, just like you said.

Edit: What sort of mobility work do O-Lifters do?

P.S. The dog in your video is cute too, it’s go a nice smile. Awesome set of teeth on it 0_o.

tedro, are you an O-Lifter or an athlete of some kind? (asking because of your BF%)

[quote]Bloobird wrote:
Thanks for your help guys, I’ll put up another couple of videos next Monday. I’ll keep in mind what you guys said and I’ll try to stop before my form goes all wonky. When watching the video I did notice my back go kinda funny that final rep.

I’ll work on getting solidly in place before I squat.

I think the depth thing is because I’m so used to squatting low-bar, with lighter weight I can get my ass to my calves, but when I’m squatting with heavy(er) weights I feel like I’ve hit rock-bottom long before I have. That will probably come with remembering to sit down rather than just back, just like you said.

Edit: What sort of mobility work do O-Lifters do?

P.S. The dog in your video is cute too, it’s go a nice smile. Awesome set of teeth on it 0_o.

tedro, are you an O-Lifter or an athlete of some kind? (asking because of your BF%)[/quote]

Was an athlete, football and track, I don’t do much anymore. I have a couple of lifting goals that I will get this winter, after that I am going to get back in running shape so that I can sprint in some amateur meets. Once you get to a certain point, it is very difficult to apply yourself and excel in two different areas like that.

I’ve never really gotten into O-lifting. I taught myself how to clean properly, but that is the only O-lift I’ve ever concentrated on, although I haven’t done it regularly for years.

I assisted in coaching a high school summer conditioning program for a few summers, and teaching proper squat, deadlift, and hang clean form to the serious athletes was my primary responsibility.

Mobility work for them wasn’t real specific, and I don’t think it needs to be. Various running and form drills (high knees, cone drills, etc.) combined with dynamic and static stretching seems to work very well if you can remain disciplined with it.

Cool, I just realized I’m actually going to squat tomorrow, so I’ll probably have a video up then, but I’m going away with school for a hiking from form thursday-saturday, so I probably won’t be able to check it until I get back

I uploaded to more videos into my profile for you guys to check out. My form on the lighter one, 70KGx1 looks pretty good to me, that’s the depth I want to get to with all my squats.

The 80KGx3 looks alright to me, the depth is still a bit shallow, I’ll probably stick with a weight close to that on Monday and just try to get below parallel.

I also squat 87.5KGx1 but my camera crapped out on me while I was setting up under the bar, so no video for that one. My friend eye-balled it and said it was at parallel.

I think its just getting the confidence to hit 3 reps at/below parallel that’s stopping me from doing it.

Any advice on my squats will be taken with pleasure