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Help With Lower Body Strength

It kinda seems that no matter how hard i work them my legs never seem to gain much strength, im 17 about 5’11 210 lbs i can bench 345, deadlift only 425 and my squat is only 275…i was just wondering on some tips to help leg strength, i do squats and lunges routinely but my legs never gain much strength???

Bro need more info what are you doing exactly the work outs he reps, sets, loads,rest, frequency etc etc as well as diet and recovery.

In general Lift heavy things, big compound movements, the at rest recover FULLY and repeat/progress.

Phill

raises eyebrow

425 pull with a 275 squat??

maybe tight hip flexors or you don’t know how to use your glutes.

there are so many factors that could be involved here you need to give waaay more info

[quote]kolt2006 wrote:
It kinda seems that no matter how hard i work them my legs never seem to gain much strength, im 17 about 5’11 210 lbs i can bench 345, deadlift only 425 and my squat is only 275…i was just wondering on some tips to help leg strength, i do squats and lunges routinely but my legs never gain much strength???[/quote]

Well, first, I wish I had your problems at 17. You are very strong already but obviously have a squating problem. Since you can deadlift 425, your legs must be pretty strong but your squat technique must be poor. There are a lot of article and videos to help you improve your technique. Maybe you also have a confidence issue with squating.

[quote]summa wrote:
Since you can deadlift 425, your legs must be pretty strong but your squat technique must be poor.

[/quote]

Or it could be all lower back and break down of form in the DL and more like a SLDL.

No matter what More info for real help and for sure like suggested read upon the squatting etc…

Phill

[quote]Phill wrote:
summa wrote:
Since you can deadlift 425, your legs must be pretty strong but your squat technique must be poor.

Or it could be all lower back and break down of form in the DL and more like a SLDL.

No matter what More info for real help and for sure like suggested read upon the squatting etc…

Phill

[/quote]

The kid could be built to deadlift.

I’ve had a hundred lb dif in my dead/squat at different times because I’m built to deadlift.

The squat could also be ATG – though that’s still a fairly large spread.

Or he could be talking about a hex bar deadlift…most kids at the high school where I taught math would tell me how much they deadlifted, but upon further investigation I learned it was hex bar deadlifts they were doing and the hex bar’s handles on the bar they were using had raised handles (2 inches), so the range of motion was diminished.

My advice: You’re young, it takes time. Alternate 3 week periods of squats, then box squats, then front squats and do lots of Bulgarian squats, lunges and step ups.

[quote]bretc wrote:
Or he could be talking about a hex bar deadlift…most kids at the high school where I taught math would tell me how much they deadlifted, but upon further investigation I learned it was hex bar deadlifts they were doing and the hex bar’s handles on the bar they were using had raised handles (2 inches), so the range of motion was diminished.

My advice: You’re young, it takes time. Alternate 3 week periods of squats, then box squats, then front squats and do lots of Bulgarian squats, lunges and step ups. [/quote]

Were these kids 6’3’’ or taller? If so, the raised handles on the HBDL is the way to go.

The guy can bench more than he can squat. That’s really wierd. In any case, giving squats more volume and the other exercises less should do the trick.

[quote]undeadlift wrote:
The guy can bench more than he can squat. That’s really wierd. In any case, giving squats more volume and the other exercises less should do the trick.[/quote]

It is an unusual spread but I can also bench more than I squat. I can bench 275 for 5 and my best squat is 275 for 4 reps. I don’t wear a belt and go ATG which does make it harder. I think people forget that squatting is a longer range of motion and you’re lifting about 75% of your bodyweight with the bar.

“If you can bench more than you can squat, you should be ashamed, not proud.”

I forget who said it, but it’s true nonetheless. I would put all upper body training on hold until my squat got where it needed to be. Longer ROM aside, there is no set of circumstances under which it is acceptable for a person to bench more than they squat. Unless of course, that person doesn’t care at all about strength, athletic ability, or aesthetics, which describes very few people who lift weights.

[quote]rmccart1 wrote:
“If you can bench more than you can squat, you should be ashamed, not proud.”

I forget who said it, but it’s true nonetheless. I would put all upper body training on hold until my squat got where it needed to be. Longer ROM aside, there is no set of circumstances under which it is acceptable for a person to bench more than they squat. Unless of course, that person doesn’t care at all about strength, athletic ability, or aesthetics, which describes very few people who lift weights.[/quote]

I used to squat more than my bench until I decided to stop wearing my belt and go below parallel.

It’s longer range of motion AND 75 to 80% of your bodyweight. I think it’s a bit harsh to say you should be ashamed.

In my case, I have always given my lower body as much attention as my upper. How many people who squat huge poundages compared to their bench are going atg without belt or wraps? Probably not many. I think some people are just better at one or the other.

I think you should try to make everything as strong as possible?

Should he be proud if he let his upper body strength diminish in order to let his squat poundage be in the “correct” ratio?

I think that this issue is very delicate. Both arguments could be said for or against.

IMO the squats should be ahead of the bench for the simple reason that you want more muscle mass in your lower body as opposed to your upper body. And by having a stronger squat you make sure this is achieved. That is not always the case with the deadlift.

There can be thousands of arguments as to why his squats are below the other powerlifts. Maybe an untold injury, unused at some point in his life, or at some time a more mental focus on bench. However, in all my years in the gym I have seen very few individuals whose natural squat strenght is less than their natural bench. And usually there is some kind of damage, instability or flexibility issue.

If there is no damage to the lumbar region, knees or achilles then the person has to analyze why the squat is far behind. Is it a flexibility problem? Is it a technique problem? or a frequency problem?

Without watching his technique in the deadlift it is very hard to know where is the imbalance. Could be that he is more SLDL the weight than using his legs in a conentional style, leaving his quads underdeveloped. This translates into doing a half-good morning at the bottom position of the squat instead of pushing with both quads and posterior chain.

One way to know for sure is to use something like this:

Squats 3x5
Bench 3x5
Dead 3x5

Do the workout like this with the squats first and analyze the ratio of the deadlift weight currently with having the deadlift after the squats. If your deadlift value lowers significantly from the number you mentioned then you are weak in the quadricep and/or other leg muscles.

Possible solution?

Do specialization of bottom-position double contraction squats alternated with cycles of regular range squats.

Something like this. Do your regular squat routine and then alternate with worksets of 3x5 the following way:

“Lower yourself with full control with a light weight. In the bottom position wait a full 2 sec and then start the movement up, as soon as you reach the middle portion go back down and do the full pause again. Go back up and that counts as 1 rep”.

You will be burning from this double contraction work, but after a cycle with this method go back to your regular style of squats and the extra muscle will let you increase the strenght faster. Don’t forget to alternate between the double contraction method and the regular one.

Also get your protein nutrition in order. From experience there are certain people who get their extra protein or calories from the leg muscles. The saying “breaking the walls to warm the house” has a different meaning when you understand where your body is eating from…