T Nation

Help with Cardio in a Strength Workout


#1

Hi every one! I’m a 27 years old guy . I’ve been lifting using the Brooks Kubik dinosaur training Beginer program for a year now ( near the end of the training). I’m a Paramedic so lift people every day at the job which is why training is slower because sometime body feels too tired to lift. I’m really aiming at gaining strenght. Think is i’m getting fat! 6’2" and 250 pounds ! So i was looking to start some cardio in my off day ( i do my grip training in my off day) any idea on what do to ? I have my gym at home and don’t have any cardio machine. I was thinking of starting rope jumping. I’m really looking at powerlifting and strongman kind of training is Dinosaur training good? I’m really enjoying it and i can feel the difference in my daily job! But i’m beginning to gasp for air going up stair !!:S i need some help!


#2

buy a pair of trainers, and go for a walk. If walking is too easy, jog. If that’s too easy, run fast.


#3

I did jogging in the summer, but soon began the have knee pain. But in the winter at -25 celsius, i’m not too much into doing my cardio outside that’s why i began to think about skipping rope


#4

I would make certain recommendations, but without knowing how you train it’s a lil difficult.


#5

What’s the saying… you can NEVER out train a bad diet. Might help if you gave some information on your diet.


#6

@ChickenLittle is right. If its weight loss that you are after, cleaning up your diet is the way to go. Since you are a beginner, you will likely still be able to add a considerable amount of strength on a restricted diet. As far as cardiovascular work, I would recommend purchasing a weight vest. Since you train at home, all you’d have to do is go for a walk with it. I have one and have used it on and off for years.


#7

I follow the dinosaur beginer training so 3 time a week 3x5 of bicep curl, military press, bent over row, bench press and shoulder Raise. then 3x10 of squat and dread lift. Each day i train i increase my rep by one for upper body and by two for.lower body. After i reach 10 for upper body and 20 for lower i start over again and increase my weight. I started with a 30 pound upper body weight and 45 lower body. I’m now at 100 for upper and 160 for lower body. On my off day i do my grip training Which is the david horn beginner training. As for diet i’m more of a eat well type of guys. I dont calculate everything etc. Last year was hard because of switch constantly from night shift to day shift so i took weight. But still i’m trying to lower my quantity and eat more often and still keep getting belly fat( legs are clean cut and well muscled) . Im the vegetable guy with chicken breast. Thing is i used to run 3 miles daily in the summer and gym spinning in winter… That was all before strenght training. I know i’ve gain muscle espacialy upper body, but i’vs stopped cardio completly, and with the job and hard shift i’ve gained weight!


#8

Ok, thanks for the info…based upon how you train I would recommend a combo of moderate intensity cardio (after your strength work-outs) 2-3 times per week & circuit training once a week (either after your last session or the day after your last strength training session).

For the moderate intensity cardio you could do stair climbs (with dbs if this too easy, jumping jacks, body weight squats and planches etc. this done for about 10 mins would be a great start.

For the circuit training you could do a circuit of: Goblet squats 20 reps, ohps 10 reps, rows 10 reps, push ups or easy angle push ups 10 reps & kb or db swings 20 reps x 5 rounds with about a 1 minute rest between rounds.

Also, on your non-training days, simply going for a long brisk walk can be really useful in burning calories.


#9

Add one of these to the end of your workouts…

Also agrre with the guys about taking a good walk, especially if knees sketchy


#10

So I was a medic and follwed Brooks Kubik workouts. Here is my advice.

  1. Like most medics I am sure you work a lot and you work wierd hours. With long and wierd hours, I am sure your diet sucks. Clean up your diet, pack healthy snacks, drank more water and less coffee and etc. etc.

2). Train heavy and hard. Some weeks as a medic I only had two days per week to train, so make the most of it.

  1. Keep your cardio simple in short. Do a simple finisher like carrying a sandbag or do farmer walks. Try indoor cardio options like jump rope, sledge hammer swings, or burpees. Also, be active on your off days, walk, play a sport, or just be outdoor.

As a medic Brook Kubik’s workouts are the best.


#11

This is a huge reason why you’re gaining fat. You’re not spending any time planning or paying serious attention to diet. What, exactly, did you eat yesterday?

If your knees bothered you running, they’re not going to hold up well jumping rope. Look into complexes (a few sets, a few days a week after training or on off days).


#12

Thank’s for all your info! Yes with weird hours getting to eat 3 times a day is sometime hard. Yesterday i ate chicken breast with salad, and pasta with 100% home made napolitain sauce.

Nothing has changed since last year in my diet ( except smaller quantities) but stopped running entirely and more weird hours switching from night to day and less good sleep oh and i was doing gsp rushfit! I really enjoy the brooks kubik training so seeing an other medic doing it is really reassuring!
I’ll try complexes sees how it goes ! I’m really trying my best to train 3 times a week my main training so i’ll try what you say William !


#13

I own several of Kubiks books including his original Dinosaur training… which I used many many moons ago when i was into doing strongman. In retrospect i can honestly say there are many approach just as good or even better than Dino training. I can honestly say I haven’t read his stuff in years and have no idea if his training approach or philosophy has changed since the publication of his first book or not. For powerlifting i can honestly say there is way better options… Personally my biggest issue ( going off the rails slightly)with Kubik is hes sorta comes across as a hypocrite in his original book . He bashes Bench only guys… yet no where have I found in his books or any other source regarding a actual meet total preformed by him. But damn he beats you over the head regarding a 400lbs bench in the 220 class he preformed in the NASA fed at their nationals in the 90,s while wearing a low end bench shirt. Ironically in his book he bashes the use of support gear…go figure.

I will give him credit …hes a good historian regarding old school strength athletes and their approach to training . Other than that I think hes vastly overrated … now understand that is just my opinion


#14

I think Kubik is solid intermediate stuff. Gotta second not jumping rope at 250lb .
Try some walking and possibly some complexes. If you have stones or a sandbag try carrying it for time.


#15

Bulldog, when Brook bashes “bench press” guys, what he really is bashing is the guys,(usually highschool/college kids), who only bench and curl aka bench muscle. He is a big advocate of heavy back and squat work. I know he competed in powerlifting back in the day, he published his squat number, but I can’t find it. Now he is big into O-lifting, because a medical issue, I think glucoma, prevents him from doing powerlifting. I also think he is competing in O-lifting.

I am not saying Brooks is the best author for someone who competes seriously. However, he doesnt write to many articles for the pros. He writes for the everyday person, the working man, students, parents, and people who do all 3. The OP is a medic, I was a medic, the typical powerlifting program, just doesn’t work for that line of work. Weird hours, lack of sleep, and etc. gets in the way of training. In this sense Brooks is an amazing author for the emergency worker, hell any working man. I will take Brook Kubik for strength work and Ross Enamait for cardio any day of the week!


#16

Understand Like i stated I am very familiar with him as I stated I have read and used several of his methods as part of my strongman period over 15 years ago. So im letting you know trying to sell me on his merits is just a waist of your time since my issue with him has less to do with his approach but other factors.

Have you read his original book?

Its great you feel the need to defend your favorite author and that is great. I was just simply stating my opinion regarding his approach for someone interested in competing in Strongman or power lifting from my experience.( For clarification Ive been doing either Bodybuilding and or strength related training on and off since my mid teens im 45 now )Which the Op did ask about… Am I saying his approach is crap ? Not at all.

NO BODY CAN FIND THEM!! Nor any competitive Deadlift numbers! FYI I competed in the same Fed he did maybe not at the same time and Ive asked around.

Working man ? Ive worked blue collar all my life a large % farming doing manual labor and the past 17 years working in a foundry environment. Besides what does Kubik know about the working man? Unless he changed careers since he published his book he was a Lawyer. To be honest a two time a week template of 5/3/1 is just as effective.

Um if he has a condition that prevents him from Powerlifting not seeing how the hell he can do O-lifting since it is in reality is more difficult.

What do you consider a typical powerlifting program ? Are you talking about a actual program to gear one for a meet or just general strength training? Sine for some reason people people want to lump getting stronger as "powerlifting"
Clarification… I want to make it clear I am not attacking you as a person. Im simply stating my opinion and my point of view. Since its almost impossible to have opposing view point online without someone getting bent out of shape and taking it personal.

So I will apologies if my post comes across as rude or me coming across as a horses ass.


#17

I can’t find his deadlift number, I looked everywhere, but I know he published his squat and bench. When I say “typical” powerlifting program, I mean any program that has a strict regimine. Dinosaur Training offers flexibility. For example, if you only have 2 days a week, that is fine, but if you can do 3 or 4 workouts that is fine too. Also, Brooks has glucoma. His doctor didn’t want him to do slow heavy lifts, such as deadlifts. However, his doctor was okay with quick lifts.