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Help Picking a Fat Loss Program

 I have a question regarding the article "Destroying Fat
  • War Room Strategies to Maximize Fat Loss".

Is this program appropriate for someone without previous weight lifting experience?

My guess is NO. If this is the case, can you tell me about a way to get someone that has never lifted in his life ready for suck a demanding program.

I understand that the increase in strength in the learning phase of a new exercise is caused by neurological adaptations that take place, so I am guessing that the intensity you would be working at is not enough to force the body to hold on to muscle.

How much training would be needed to reach a point where you are really challenge your muscles(again, I am presuming that the 2 days of heavy training become effective at preserving muscle mass only from the point at which the the intensity is so big that the body has to preserve it’s muscle mass to be able to perform the exercises)?

Also, I would like to know if it would be wise to be 2-3 weeks on a low calorie and low carb diet, during which no exercise would be done, to jump start the fat loss. After that period I would do a 2 day carb refeed and then start the actual program.
After this 2-3 weeks I would switch to a diet that is more calorie dense and includes more carbs (adding starch carbs post workout)

I also want to mention that I am not a bodybuilder, so losing a bit of muscle is not a problem for me and that

i say wait till you start going to the gym

as for the neurological adaptations dont worry. i personally lift almost to failure and sometimes to failure and ive gained muscle while losing around 20 lbs.

if for example you need to do a set of 8 reps bench press

start with just the barbell, if it seems easy, add 20 kgs, try doing 8 again, if its easy, add 20 more, try again, its probably gonna tire you a bit, wait a minute, add 10 kgs try again. if you try really hard and cant do 8 reps then decrease it by 5 kgs and thats more or less how much you should lift.

as for the neural adaptations i think they happen really fast, today i did 65 kgs on a new exercise whereas the last time i did 55. generally as far as ive noticed from me 1-3 times of doing the exercise are enough in most cases

OP, you put so much info in that post I didn’t even read all of it.

The Destroying Fat program probably isn’t your best bet for now. You are a beginner and that’s ok.

Read the stickies at the top of the Beginner’s Forum. There is a plethora of information in them including, but not limited to, diets, training, etc. Go read a little bit. Then choose a program, choose a dieting style that you think will work for you, then go for it. Keep asking questions, but for yourself, try to find the answer on your own first. You’ll feel better about learning it.

If you have to wait a few weeks to get to a gym, don’t let this time go to waste. Start conditioning your body with bodyweight exercises. Get used to using your body right away.

Challenging is relative. Challenging is whatever is harder than whatever you have done before. Your body will start adapting to increased loads immediately. You may not notice them right away but changes are happening.

If you are just starting out, you don’t have to go on a “program” right away. Start learning all you can about nutrition. Start incorporating what you learn as soon as you can. Develop a strategy that you can sustain for the long term involving resistance exercise, cardio exercise and nutrition.

A good starting point is bodyweight exercises (push ups or dips, inverted rows or chin ups, situps, back extensions, squats), long walks with some sprints, lots of vegetables, protein, and good fats and eliminate sugar and white flour, and limit all grains, potatoes and beans.

[quote]trif_m wrote:
I have a question regarding the article "Destroying Fat

  • War Room Strategies to Maximize Fat Loss".

Is this program appropriate for someone without previous weight lifting experience?

My guess is NO. If this is the case, can you tell me about a way to get someone that has never lifted in his life ready for suck a demanding program.

I understand that the increase in strength in the learning phase of a new exercise is caused by neurological adaptations that take place, so I am guessing that the intensity you would be working at is not enough to force the body to hold on to muscle.

How much training would be needed to reach a point where you are really challenge your muscles(again, I am presuming that the 2 days of heavy training become effective at preserving muscle mass only from the point at which the the intensity is so big that the body has to preserve it’s muscle mass to be able to perform the exercises)?

Also, I would like to know if it would be wise to be 2-3 weeks on a low calorie and low carb diet, during which no exercise would be done, to jump start the fat loss. After that period I would do a 2 day carb refeed and then start the actual program.
After this 2-3 weeks I would switch to a diet that is more calorie dense and includes more carbs (adding starch carbs post workout)

I also want to mention that I am not a bodybuilder, so losing a bit of muscle is not a problem for me and that[/quote]

I jumped right in with the Complexes for fat loss routines. The first few weeks were more about learning form than actually using the lifts for fat loss but it worked pretty well. I wouldn’t suggest a calorie deficit diet unless you are lifting to try and preserve muscle although a low carb approach seems to work pretty well for me. If you go very low calorie without lifting most of your weight loss will be muscle. Trust me been there, made that mistake, still trying to fix it.

PeterD