T Nation

HELP: Nutritionist Job Interview

Hey guys,

Well I just got a call about a job interview as a nutrition consultant. Credentials are not important if you know your stuff.

So, Basically I am asking for some help regarding these topics,
Glycemic Index and insulin response.

I have what foods to eat down pat I just would like to have a better understanding of the glycemic index and MAINLY insulin response.

Such as what happens to your insulin when you eat a slice of white bread versus a bowl of fiber. Thanks and I appreciate all responses. (I’ll be back later to respond.)

Well, a bowl of fiber (not sure what that means), will have nearly no effect on insulin, assuming it’s only fiber.

White bread on the other hand will have a profound impact on insulin secretion, assuming white bread is all you eat. That there is the short fall of the glycemic index.

Common guys I’m dying here…

[quote]andruw_doucette wrote:
Common guys I’m dying here…
[/quote]

guess my post was invisible, lol

I don’t really understand what you want? A physiology lesson?

Google it? Pubmed?

So you want us to help you fake your way into a position where people will be trusting their health to your advice?

[quote]conorh wrote:
I don’t really understand what you want? A physiology lesson?

Google it? Pubmed?[/quote]

Exactly. I mean seriously, if you’re going to be a nutritional consultant you should be able to do some basic research on basic topics. And no disrespect intended, but if your idea of research is going onto a forum and asking the general public for advice, then you might want to think about another line of work.

[quote]allenkt wrote:
conorh wrote:
I don’t really understand what you want? A physiology lesson?

Google it? Pubmed?

Exactly. I mean seriously, if you’re going to be a nutritional consultant you should be able to do some basic research on basic topics. And no disrespect intended, but if your idea of research is going onto a forum and asking the general public for advice, then you might want to think about another line of work.

[/quote]

Good post. I wasn’t going to say anything, since last time someone called me “bitter” when I questioned someone wanting to be a trainer.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

Good post. I wasn’t going to say anything, since last time someone called me “bitter” when I questioned someone wanting to be a trainer.[/quote]

Yeah, I almost didn’t say anything but I don’t get my feelings hurt by what someone says to me in an internet forum and hopefully he doesn’t either.

This place has become unbelievable. Dude, its not an actual Nutritionist position. Its just a consultant when you need help or advice about a certain food or if you need mental support.

What the heck do you mean basic research on basic topics? I have been doing my research and am looking for some more opinions on ONE topic…

thanks anyway, but I’m not looking for you to give me direction for my life, just some info on the topic previously mentioned.

do you agree with this…

Two critical ways to control and manage both diabetes and insulin are through diet and exercise. With respect to ones diet it is important to pay heed to the glycemic index (GI). The glycemic index is a ranking of carbohydrates (CHOs) on a scale of 0 to 100 in relation to the rate at which they raise blood sugar levels after eating.

Foods with a high GI rapidly raise blood sugar levels and generally spike insulin levels; whereas foods with a low GI slowly raise blood sugar levels and have a more blunted and sustained insulin response. To measure the GI, 10 subjects fast overnight and are fed 10-50 grams of CHO containing foods and then finger-prick blood sugar samples are taken at 15-30 minute intervals for the next two hours. A blood sugar response curve is then constructed from this data and the area under the curve is used to calculate the GI compared to a base food (an equal amount of glucose).

The area under the curve is divided by the area under the curve for glucose and then multiplied by 100 to achieve the GI rating. Generally foods with a low GI are preferential because it will cause a smaller insulin burst. -Jason Feldman

I just think you should already know this if you are going to apply for the job.

Insulin regulation/sensitivity is talked about quite often on this site. I would have thought in your classes, especially with the rate of obesity in America and the rise of diabetes that those subjects would have been thoroughly covered.

Do you know if they want the science behind it, or just the “how to” on the proper ways of nutrition?

[quote]thomas.galvin wrote:
So you want us to help you fake your way into a position where people will be trusting their health to your advice?[/quote]

LOL. Ain’t that the truth.

I didnt go to school to become a nutritionist. LEt me explain…

Simply for Life helps Obese people lose weight based upon the glycemic index. They do not hire Certified Nutritionists because they do their own training.

I have a good understanding of the glycemic index but…in terms of understanding insulin secretion and its impact of storing fat cells I am still looking for some help.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:

Good post. I wasn’t going to say anything, since last time someone called me “bitter” when I questioned someone wanting to be a trainer.[/quote]

I guess the apology wasn’t accepted eh? :slight_smile:

[quote]905Patrick wrote:
jehovasfitness wrote:

Good post. I wasn’t going to say anything, since last time someone called me “bitter” when I questioned someone wanting to be a trainer.

I guess the apology wasn’t accepted eh? :)[/quote]

it was accepted :slight_smile: , just didn’t want to be accused again :wink:

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

Insulin is used by your body for homeostasis.

Homeostasis - your body regulating itself i.e - temperature, water levels and blood glucose levels.

Insulin is released by your pancreas to lower blood glucose levels.

So if you eat white bread, it will turn into glucose (through various stages using enzymes) and then your body will have higher blood glucose levels.

Assuming you don’t exercise to use the glucose from the white bread for energy, insulin will be released to lower the glucose levels.

If you eat a bowl of pure fibre, nothing will happen because it will just go straight through your system and your blood glucose levels will not be effected.

A typical example of insulin response is Diabetes (Type 1)

When someone is a type 1 diabetic, they don’t produce insulin (or not enough insulin) so they require insulin injections to lower the blood glucose levels.

So if they ate 5 mars bars, they glucose levels would be shockingly high and they could die if they did not inject insulin to bring it down.

That should be enough to help you with your insulin response question.


Glycemic index is fairly simple, High GI = higher sugar foods like cakes etc, so if you understand the above, you should understand it will result in a higher insulin response.

Low GI = lower sugar foods like rice, oatmeal, and this results in a longer sustained release of insulin. If any at all, because exercise could lower the blood glucose concentration anyway.

You can learn this in high school biology or through 15 minutes of google and its terrible you needed to come on here to find out to get yourself a job.

They should of asked you this shit on the spot in my opinion.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
Goodfellow wrote:
Insulin is used by your body for homeostasis.

Homeostasis - your body regulating itself i.e - temperature, water levels and blood glucose levels.

Insulin is released by your pancreas to lower blood glucose levels.

So if you eat white bread, it will turn into glucose (through various stages using enzymes) and then your body will have higher blood glucose levels.

Assuming you don’t exercise to use the glucose from the white bread for energy, insulin will be released to lower the glucose levels.

Not quite; insulin will still be released, since you can’t immediately burn of the energy from the bread to compensate for the rise in blood glucose.

If you eat a bowl of pure fibre, nothing will happen because it will just go straight through your system and your blood glucose levels will not be effected.

A typical example of insulin response is Diabetes (Type 1)

When someone is a type 1 diabetic, they don’t produce insulin (or not enough insulin) so they require insulin injections to lower the blood glucose levels.

Type I diabetics do not produce any insulin. Type II have the capacity to make insulin, but increadibly poor sensitivity.

So if they ate 5 mars bars, they glucose levels would be shockingly high and they could die if they did not inject insulin to bring it down.

That should be enough to help you with your insulin response question.


Glycemic index is fairly simple, High GI = higher sugar foods like cakes etc, so if you understand the above, you should understand it will result in a higher insulin response.

Low GI = lower sugar foods like rice, oatmeal, and this results in a longer sustained release of insulin. If any at all, because exercise could lower the blood glucose concentration anyway.

You can learn this in high school biology or through 15 minutes of google and its terrible you needed to come on here to find out to get yourself a job.

They should of asked you this shit on the spot in my opinion.

[/quote]

Oh thats just being picky <=P