T Nation

Help Me With Leg Training


#1

Last Monday I wrecked my shoulder and I see the writing on the wall; it's going to be a while before I can train upper.

For the past several years I've been training for 1 hour five days a week on my lunch break and I like having that time to push it and get some mid-day stress relief. Spending that time doing "therapy" just isn't going to cut it so I want to keep pushing it hard during my lunch hour then just do some therapy later at home.

So, that means I will need to try to figure out a schedule for training legs hard 5 days a week. I don't have any machines. I've got a rack and a shoulder friendly bar so I will be able to squat. I can do all kinds of split squat and step-up variations and I've got a sled for pushing and pulling. Pushing the sled might be off limits at first. I doubt I will be able to deadlift but I can probably RDL light or do single leg RDL. I've got a Glute Ham Developer.

One plan I've toyed with is to do normal leg days on Monday & Thursday then on Tues & Friday do Concentric/Plyo type workouts. In this plan I'd sacrifice Wednesdays to the dreaded therapy sessions.

Can any of you come up with something better, more fun or more interesting? I don't really have any goals. I'll be happy if my legs get bigger, stronger or faster, I've got no preference for which. I just like working hard and progressing in some way.


#2

I would start off by fixing my shoulder so you don’t have to try and come up with a 5 sequential days of leg training plan.


#3

I’d say that if you want to do this, go to the Oly Lifting forum and read up. They squat 5 days a week often.


#4

Smolov has you squatting many days a week. I can’t actually vouch for the program, as I’ve never run it.


#5

[quote]cparker wrote:
I would start off by fixing my shoulder so you don’t have to try and come up with a 5 sequential days of leg training plan.[/quote]
This x100.

[quote]on edge wrote:
Last Monday I wrecked my shoulder and I see the writing on the wall; it’s going to be a while before I can train upper. [/quote]
Do you know exactly what happened? What the injury specifically was?

At 50 years old, I trust you’re smart enough to know that if a shoulder injury (or really any injury) becomes chronic now, it can thoroughly fuck up your entire training life from here on out. Healing, and healing [i]100%[/i] has got to be the priority. Whether it means physical therapy/rehab, surgery, whatever.

Especially since you don’t have any concrete goals right now anyway, I suggest stealing a goal directly from Wendler when he had surgery to repair his rotator cuff and labrum:
"The simple goal was to be able to press overhead and bench press pain-free. But really, that wasn’t going to cut it for me. You need to have actual performance goals, or at least I do, to make it worthwhile.

My big goal was to be able to overhead press 135 pounds correctly after 6 months. I’ve known many people who’ve done this 6 weeks after the surgery but I wanted to be patient."

The Mighty Stu also recently had his second labrum surgery (making it one for each shoulder) and also did his therapy diligently instead of just rotating quad day, ham day, quad day, ham day, calf day. Eric Cressey has written a ton about shoulder health, mostly from his perspective working with athletes (baseball players in particular).

Not the advice you wanted to hear, but IMO, it’s the better path.


#6

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]cparker wrote:
I would start off by fixing my shoulder so you don’t have to try and come up with a 5 sequential days of leg training plan.[/quote]
This x100.

[quote]on edge wrote:
Last Monday I wrecked my shoulder and I see the writing on the wall; it’s going to be a while before I can train upper. [/quote]
Do you know exactly what happened? What the injury specifically was?

At 50 years old, I trust you’re smart enough to know that if a shoulder injury (or really any injury) becomes chronic now, it can thoroughly fuck up your entire training life from here on out. Healing, and healing [i]100%[/i] has got to be the priority. Whether it means physical therapy/rehab, surgery, whatever.

Especially since you don’t have any concrete goals right now anyway, I suggest stealing a goal directly from Wendler when he had surgery to repair his rotator cuff and labrum:
"The simple goal was to be able to press overhead and bench press pain-free. But really, that wasn’t going to cut it for me. You need to have actual performance goals, or at least I do, to make it worthwhile.

My big goal was to be able to overhead press 135 pounds correctly after 6 months. I’ve known many people who’ve done this 6 weeks after the surgery but I wanted to be patient."

The Mighty Stu also recently had his second labrum surgery (making it one for each shoulder) and also did his therapy diligently instead of just rotating quad day, ham day, quad day, ham day, calf day. Eric Cressey has written a ton about shoulder health, mostly from his perspective working with athletes (baseball players in particular).

Not the advice you wanted to hear, but IMO, it’s the better path.[/quote]

Don’t worry guys, I’ll be rehabbing my shoulder everyday. I just won’t be doing it during my training hour. I’ll probably wait a week or two before I see a doctor. I don’t want to mess with that hassle until I know for sure its necessary.

I also think I can rehab it better than PT’s can (I’ve had very poor results with PTs in the past) and if it comes down to surgery I’m not sure if I will opt for that. In 2007 I was diagnosed with a frayed labrum. I didn’t do surgery and it took a very long time but I was able to rehab it on my own. A few years ago I was talking to a kid (22ish) who was coming back from surgery for a frayed labrum. He was throwing just fine but he told me if he had to do it again he would pass on the surgery because the recovery was so hard. The fact that I’m 50 is not lost on me in this regard.

This injury, btw, was from diving back into 2nd base while playing baseball and the dive was similar to how any baserunner would routinely dive back into 1st base. I might have had an extra step or two but have now idea why it hurt my shoulder. It didn’t seem so bad at the time either. I could throw and bat just fine afterward.


#7

How do you effectively plan to rehab it if you don’t know whats injured? PT will be different for an AC injury than it would be a torn labrum or rotator cuff. You run the risk of actually making your injury worse by not knowing what it is that needs rehabbed.

What do you want to get out of hitting the legs hard? Size? Strength? Explosiveness? I think that will dictate what your days will look like…


#8

I don’t know what your leg development is like, so if you’re far more advanced than I am, this advice may not be useful. But for me, performing back squats once a week using a variety of set and rep schemes, has been almost all I’ve done for my legs. I deadlift too, but I believe squats have been the key to my leg development.

If I were to perform multiple leg sessions per week, and I couldn’t deadlift, I would only do squats and lunges (given your equipment). I would do both movements each session. I would hit a heavy single, double, or triple 1 day of the week on squats, and I would do my lunges in the 10-20 rep range. On the day(s) I didn’t hit a heavy rep or 2 on squat, I would do something along the lines of 5 sets of 20, or maybe work up to an even higher rep set. On the heavy days, I would get my rep work in with a few sets of 5 or so.

Just some thoughts. Hope the rehab goes well!