T Nation

Help for Strongman Comp in June

ok so im doing a strong man comp in june. if you are a strongman competitor who has done fairly well in the sprt, will you give me some training ideas cuz im currently training for powerlifting. thanks

It’s called the search function. Use it.

Training ideas:

Lift Heavy
Train Events

I generally try not to come off as an asshole to anyone trying to get into strongman, but it’s pretty damn hard to hold back here. You’re not giving any info here and I don’t think many people are interested in spoon feeding you…

look im not asking for a frinekn journal, but i just want some tips, cuz i wanna perform best. like should i do more shouldr and grip traiing? or more clean and press? i already train as a powerlifter, but i dont have rescources for any events really except llike deadlift stuff and like clean and press, but no farmer walk, or anything like that, so i just need a lil info…

Events.

Gym lifts do not equal kicking ass in all the events.

You gotta know how to do them.

brauny96
try to find a group in you locale that trains strongman. without the equp to train events it’s gonna be REAL hard for your first strongman contest to do well.

if you train powerlifting already then you have the strength base, but the only way to get good at tire flips, stones, conans, kegs, etc you gotta get your hands on the equip, no way around it.

[quote]brauny96 wrote:
look im not asking for a frinekn journal, but i just want some tips, cuz i wanna perform best. like should i do more shouldr and grip traiing? or more clean and press? i already train as a powerlifter, but i dont have rescources for any events really except llike deadlift stuff and like clean and press, but no farmer walk, or anything like that, so i just need a lil info…[/quote]

I guess I was stupid to think you would try the search feature or even post any relevant information. I mean, why would I expect that from someone who can’t even be bothered to make an attempt to capitalize or spell correctly, let alone use complete sentences.

I have no idea what a “frinekn” journal is or what it means to “train as a powerlifter”. Beyond that, I don’t have a clue what you are trying to say.

go to nastrongmaninc.com, find your state chair, email him to find a training group in your area.

[quote]KBCThird wrote:
go to nastrongmaninc.com, find your state chair, email him to find a training group in your area.[/quote]

i see u live in new york. i just went to the website to try and find our chair. i couldnt find him. would u mind if u know, tell me who our chair is.

[quote]w3llis wrote:
KBCThird wrote:
go to nastrongmaninc.com, find your state chair, email him to find a training group in your area.

i see u live in new york. i just went to the website to try and find our chair. i couldnt find him. would u mind if u know, tell me who our chair is.[/quote]

http://www.nastrongmaninc.com/chairmen.asp

I’ve only been in two comps now, and I’m no pro card contender, but I can tell you that you need to figure out how to train events. I’m not the strongest, not the most athletic or the most genetically blessed guy you will ever meet (handsome, yes, but that is irrelevant here), yet I consistently smoke guys who are new to the sport. Why? Because I know the implements and know what to do with them. An atlas stone is not a deadlift and a log press is not just a push press. Now, the good news is that it doesn’t take most guys too long to figure out how to handle some of the more unique implements. So get yourself to a training group and try it out.

I suggest you to just keep raising your lifts and make sure your technique on whatever the events are are picture perfect… That’s pretty much it. You don’t need to be too specific. Vogehlpol doesn’t squat alot, look at where it got him. He recently smashed a world record at 242 pounds.

…His secret? BOX SQUAT.

Increasing lifts such as squats, DLs, OH presses, or any other heavy compound movements should have a direct carryover with the events. Just make sure you practice the events to build the right motor habits.

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
I suggest you to just keep raising your lifts and make sure your technique on whatever the events are are picture perfect… That’s pretty much it. [/quote]

I doubt I’ve ever seen anyone with picture perfect technique on any lift. There are ways to make the lift more efficient, yes, but statements like this are what have new guys coming to training and after every set asking ‘how was my form, how was my form?’ Yeah, be open to critiques and tips, watch and learn, but just get strong

And dont practice the events “just often enough.” I’ve yet to meet someone who trains events too often

[quote]TYPE2B wrote:
Increasing lifts such as squats, DLs, OH presses, or any other heavy compound movements should have a direct carryover with the events.[/quote]

They should, but they really don’t. I had this same mindset in the past and all it got me was several bottom-three finishes. I trained hard in the gym and got stronger on all my core lifts, but I still sucked as a strongman. I know I’ve preached it many other threads on this site, but the truth is you have to train the events if you want to be competitive!

There’s no lift in the gym that will give you the same feel as lifting an atlas stone. I’ve never walked out of Bally’s with bloody forearms.

Are you better at flipping a tire with the arms wider than legs, back parallel stance? Or is your strength in the narrower grip, deadlift/clean style of tire flip? If you don’t know, you won’t find out with a traditional gym lift.

Now matter how many super-maximal partial squats you do, it won’t teach you the core stability and footwork of a heavy yoke walk.

And there’s lots of footwork to learn. Footwork in the yoke. Footwork in truck pulls and pushes. Footwork in farmers and keg carries. How do you train that in the gym.

I’m not saying gym lifts aren’t important, but if you want to be a competitive strongman, what you can do in the events is the most important. If your squat stays at 405 for a year, but in that time you went from loading a 275 pound stone to a 375’er, you’re a better strongman. No one cares about your bench or your bent row in a competition.

Malonetd and KBC nailed it. Picture perfect form? In strongman? You have to be out of your damn mind. The goal is to move weight, and when you are lifting an atlas stone it will look nothing like a textbook deadlift. Cleaning a log more closely resembles the extreme body english of a teen trying to curl more weight than his body can handle than it resembles an actual clean. Strongman lifts are dirty and nasty, and if you can’t figure out how to put your body into a lift you are going to be wasting a lot of time throwing your money down to compete.

The last thing that I will say is that the more you compete the better you will be. Training is one thing, but getting your body in front of a judge is another. Consider it the difference between what you think is a super sweet deadlift, and what an IPF judge thinks is a hitch or a non-lockout. Truthfully, you just have to get out there and experience the contest atmosphere. Long waits between events, long days of competing, nerves, crowds… you just need to compete to be good at competing.

[quote]malonetd wrote:
TYPE2B wrote:
Increasing lifts such as squats, DLs, OH presses, or any other heavy compound movements should have a direct carryover with the events.

They should, but they really don’t. I had this same mindset in the past and all it got me was several bottom-three finishes. I trained hard in the gym and got stronger on all my core lifts, but I still sucked as a strongman. I know I’ve preached it many other threads on this site, but the truth is you have to train the events if you want to be competitive!

There’s no lift in the gym that will give you the same feel as lifting an atlas stone. I’ve never walked out of Bally’s with bloody forearms.

Are you better at flipping a tire with the arms wider than legs, back parallel stance? Or is your strength in the narrower grip, deadlift/clean style of tire flip? If you don’t know, you won’t find out with a traditional gym lift.

Now matter how many super-maximal partial squats you do, it won’t teach you the core stability and footwork of a heavy yoke walk.

And there’s lots of footwork to learn. Footwork in the yoke. Footwork in truck pulls and pushes. Footwork in farmers and keg carries. How do you train that in the gym.

I’m not saying gym lifts aren’t important, but if you want to be a competitive strongman, what you can do in the events is the most important. If your squat stays at 405 for a year, but in that time you went from loading a 275 pound stone to a 375’er, you’re a better strongman. No one cares about your bench or your bent row in a competition.[/quote]

You certainly know what you’re talking about. I agree completely.

It’s called “specificity of training”.

…Although it’s great to be specific with events, one thing to keep in mind is that certain things have carryover to certain things whether they may be positive or not. Curls can indirectly raise your bent row.

General athleticism and strength have their place. Everything a strongman does would be considered GPP, in my mind. Equipment varies pretty widely, and training on one farmers walk handle has good carry over to another farmers walk handle, but these implements aren’t like olympic barbells. They aren’t all the same, in fact they can be wildly different.

A farmers walk can have different pickup heights (you may be able to support a weight but not pick it up if the handle is low… this happens to me a lot), different lengths end to end (impacts how you turn the implement if you have a turn in competition), the grips may be thicker, slick, the implements may not be well balanced… there is a lot of variation there. None of that will have any bearing on how much you deadlift in the gym.

I currently train with a guy who came over from powerlifting, with a 700lb deadlift. Great deadlifter, terrible farmers walker. He can deadlift nearly 350lbs more than I can, and I can out walk him any day of the week at any weight. Why? Because I train in farmers walks. I’m not talking about nudging him out either, I’m talking about flat out doubling his performance. I also weigh a good 80+ lbs less than he does. He isn’t a fat slug either, we are talking about a guy that was a wrestler, so he is athletic and mobile.

So what does he need to do to have a chance to beat me? Well, not more deadlifts or jogging on a treadmill or box jumps. He needs to get time on farmers walk handles and train.

Truth. Strongman is an ugly sport, picture perfect just means getting the rep to count without hurting yourself.