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Help Designing Program

I’ve been following 5/3/1 up till now, but I want to start making my own programs because I would like to become a coach and I think it would be good practice. I bought a few books by the ACSM to start off and this is what I came up with. My main goal is to get stronger because I am going to start MMA training. Any suggestions/criticisms would be appreciated.

Workout 1
A1 - Squats
A2 - Chins
B1 - CG bench
B2 - DB rows
C1 - Lateral raises
C2 - Lunges
D1 - Dips
D2 - Pinch gripping
E - Abs

Workout 2
A1 - Deadlifts
A2 - Chins
B - Bench
C1 - Shrugs
C2 - Lunges
D1 - Curls
D2 - Triceps pushdowns
E - Abs

Sets of 2-4 x 8-12 except for abs
Alternating workouts M/W/F

this routine is for MMA?

Yeah I thought I should add some strength training because the MMA gym I’m going to doesn’t really have any S&C besides some kettlebell classes.

if you want to design strength training for MMA (and god knows i’m no expert), i’d get the reps a lot lower, maybe 5-6 reps tops depending on the movement, and pattern in some kind of speed work with some movements.

i think all of the pulling should be done strapless and with heaps of chalk as necessary to build grip strength.

i’m not sure lateral raises would be needed…

Alright, thanks a lot fr0IVIan

I was thinking about switching the main lifts to 4x5 and then maybe 3x3 once I’m consistent. Should I lower the volume for the assistance work too? And I don’t know if this counts as speed work, but I usually do some sprints as a finisher.

I don’t use straps but my gym doesn’t allow chalk. I’m switching gyms for the summer so I’ll try to find one that does.

Maybe instead of lateral raises I’ll do DB shoulder presses.

[quote]98poundweakling wrote:
I’ve been following 5/3/1 up till now, but I want to start making my own programs because I would like to become a coach and I think it would be good practice. [/quote]

totally. instead of putting your clients on programs that are known to be effective you can make stuff up for them that might work!!

Well I would feel kind of cheesy giving my athletes a book and basically saying “do this.” Even Jim Wendler had to start somewhere, and in his last article he said constantly writing out programs was good practice. I’m not just going to make stuff up, I am constantly reading and attending as many seminars as I can, and I will at least get certified through the NSCA when I graduate. I have 3 years to learn as much as I can until I plan to actually start coaching, so hopefully that’s enough time to form a good base.

But don’t worry, if someone asked me for advice now I would just point them to 5/3/1 or WS4SB, but in the future I would like to be able to come up with programs for my athletes by myself.

  1. Get hold of Juggernaut method for bjj book

great books if you want to be a coach and train athletes. IMO periodization is key. and remembering that you want them to get faster and stronger for their sport, not just for lifting weights.

[quote]98poundweakling wrote:
But don’t worry, if someone asked me for advice now I would just point them to 5/3/1 or WS4SB, but in the future I would like to be able to come up with programs for my athletes by myself[/quote]
I think this mind set is standard in the beginning.

Here is an article that might help you:

As for program design, read everything! It’s OK to double check your work with other knowledgeable people. BUT people design programs based on different experiences and knowledge sets. Two highly knowledgeable people might give the same client different programs and neither is wrong. When it comes time for you to give your clients their programs make sure you have the knowledge to back up what you designed. Research, research, research. THEN, test, test, test. First yourself(like you are doing), then friends for free, etc. Oh, and document what works.

Just my .02

just my .02 about volume…

you should be careful with it, and remember that lifting recovery should ideally not impact technique work.

also, adding more volume might be more beneficial for someone looking to move up in weight, accompanied by the proper diet.

also with regards to conditioning, granted I’ve never trained in any combat sport but the usual Crossfit-type training I’ve seen as part of conditioning just seems stupid. why do power cleans at 135 lb for 20 reps if you can do 225 for 5 or 6 (or even 3) and get stronger?