T Nation

Heliodisplay Physics

I’ve been thinking about this one for a long time now, and since I have the impression of there is some physics majors in T-Nation, I thought I’d ask here:

I came over this very fascinating next-generation TV technology called heliodisplay ( http://www.io2technology.com/ ).

It basicly project light beams (probobly infrared?) into the air, stop at 0,xxx meters, heats up the air very locally which makes use of the luminescense ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminescence ) princple and produces visual light of a certain wavelength. With many beams it creates a matrix of lights, which is a picture floating in the air.

Now what I don’t get, is how can an electromagnetic beam heat up the air at 0,113m but not at 0,112m?

The patent application:
appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?
Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=% 2Fnetahtml%2FPTO% 2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=1&s1=‘20040001182’.PGNR.&OS=DN/20040001182&RS=DN/20040001182

The machine takes humidity out of the air and uses the water to shoot up a sheet of water vapor, onto which the image is projected. So not as cool as you might think.

OK, the link didn’t display. You can go to:
http://appft1.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/srchnum.html
and search for 20040001182 .

[quote]larryb wrote:
The machine takes humidity out of the air and uses the water to shoot up a sheet of water vapor, onto which the image is projected. So not as cool as you might think.[/quote]

Ah, I see. Thanks for clearing that up and for the link.