T Nation

Heavy Unracks

Does anyone utilize heavy unracks as a type of overload for your CNS?

I tried it the other day, after doing reverse band squats, and turned purple, shook around, then racked it after 10 seconds. However, after doing so, I was so burnt out that the rest of my workout felt like SHIT. I could hardly finish the rest of my workout, to be honest.

Does anyone have any thoughts on them? Have they helped? Did they hinder your progress more than help?

I’d use partials instead, such as 600lbs quarter (more like 1/8th) squats for reps (10-20). It definitely gets your system going and you’ll have your CNS primed instead of annihilated.

I think that heavy partials, (like 1/4-1/8) for lower reps like 3 would do a better job of priming the CNS. I feel that higher reps for me personally, regardless of the ROM will fatigue me muscularly whereas low reps will only really prime the CNS when done correctly.

IMO, they are stupid and put you at risk for injury.

Trust your training cycle.

You need to be mentally tough enough to take a weight out of the rack you have never had on your back before, feel like you are going to get smashed, tighten up and smoke it anyway.

We teach lifters to turn that part of their brain off. Doesn’t matter what it feels like on the set-up. Tighten up and get it done.

This whole prime your CNS shit is dumb.

You’re either strong enough to squat it or not.

[quote]ebomb5522 wrote:
I think that heavy partials, (like 1/4-1/8) for lower reps like 3 would do a better job of priming the CNS. I feel that higher reps for me personally, regardless of the ROM will fatigue me muscularly whereas low reps will only really prime the CNS when done correctly. [/quote]

Could be, I think the problem with it is that I’m so psyched by the ability to move larger weights that I always decide to take it for reps… Guess you just need to restrain yourself on that one…

I think stand-ups are good, Ernie Frantz has always had his lifters doing it, and he has produced some very good lifters over the years

[quote]crashcrew56 wrote:
I think stand-ups are good, Ernie Frantz has always had his lifters doing it, and he has produced some very good lifters over the years[/quote]

When you refer to “stand-ups” are you talking about starting on the pins and squatting up?

[quote]apwsearch wrote:
IMO, they are stupid and put you at risk for injury.

Trust your training cycle.

You need to be mentally tough enough to take a weight out of the rack you have never had on your back before, feel like you are going to get smashed, tighten up and smoke it anyway.

We teach lifters to turn that part of their brain off. Doesn’t matter what it feels like on the set-up. Tighten up and get it done.

This whole prime your CNS shit is dumb.

You’re either strong enough to squat it or not.[/quote]

I second most of what he said, you need to prime your CNS, but I also think that if your amped up enough and your mentally ready, nothing is going to stop you. If your focused, that last thing that youll think about is how heavy the weight is out of the rack, I guarantee it.

[quote]brauny96 wrote:
ou need to prime your CNS
[/quote]

OK, now you have won the distinct honor of having to explain what the hell “prime your CNS” means.

Seriously.

It’s cold up here. Tomorrow or Saturday I will need to mow my grass and I have a primer bulb for my mower. I will hit it 3 times and pull the start and it will run.

Literally 20 seconds before starting it. Push, push, push, pull.

Seems like a fair analogy to me.

To me ‘prime’ means put together a training cycle that points you in the direction of your goals and roll with it.

Seriously. Heavy unracks are for the weak of mind.

I don’t know about priming but I do like to do some at the end of a workout, expecially close to a meet. Wouldn’t do them all the time, but they are good for getting your body used to the heavy weight. Taking the weight out and walking it back should not be difficult and these help to make them easier. If you are a multi ply, monolift lifter, I don’t know but for raw or single ply lifters who walk the weight out, these are good.

I haven’t done anything like this in a long time but have been itching to do it again. In HS, we used to load up 110-120% on our max day, and do a 5 second hold. Then when we went to max it felt light. I think its partially psychological but also excites your supporting muscles and gets them ready for the max.

[quote]dankid wrote:
I haven’t done anything like this in a long time but have been itching to do it again. In HS, we used to load up 110-120% on our max day, and do a 5 second hold. Then when we went to max it felt light. I think its partially psychological but also excites your supporting muscles and gets them ready for the max.[/quote]

I have had this same experience on the bench. I would do heavy sets of 2-3 starting fro 2-4 ‘’ from my chest prior to my actual bench press and my bench literally shot up 30 pounds in three weeks after starting that. I really believe that made all the difference because it was the only thing I really changed about my bench training.

Thanks, guys. I think I’ll just stick to reverse bands to overload. I was just curious as to what others thought about them.

I use to do walkouts with 600 when I squat squatting about 405…

Stupid really. Set my back off a few times and you know what… it never increased my squat. It only made the weight feel light, at least till I was in the hole.

Spend time doing exercises that will increase whatever lift you need work on.

Overloading CNS is stupid as other people have said. I simply have to reiterate.

Time spent training in a fashion that will provide the move improvement is time well spent. I’d spend your time doing something more productive.

I think that theoretically, they might useful to “potentiate” the nervous system before a lift. The body definitely has nervous system mechanisms that keep the body from applying a large percentage of the force that it is actually capable of producing.

I guess it could be thought of as an emergency brake, to keep us from imposing excessive forces on the body to prevent injury. By holding a weight heavier than you can squat on your back before a squat, I think your body would probably release some of those mechanisms that prevent us from being able to produce force, making the body capable of lifting a heavier weight than was possible in an “unpotentiated” state.

Now, whether or not this actually happens is definitely debatable, and it would be pretty hard to prove or disprove it.

I like to use walkouts with 40-80lbs over my max, it usually makes the weight feel lighter on my back and gets me use to heavier weights. If I go heavier or want to save energy, sometimes I just lift it off the hooks with no walkout. I’m running smolov and walking out 600 before my starting 10x3 at 475 made it feel light.

I wouldn’t tell someone to go above there max at first. You gotta build up slow, but then you can use a constant weight for a while. I used 545 for a while, then 585, now 610.

Heavy walkouts can be very usefull, they aren’t stupid at all, but there probably isn’t any reason to use more than 110% of your max, using 150% of your max would be a waste. Just 100 - 110 % of your max at the end of your squat workout occasionally, mostly as you get close to a competition. You don’t want to struggle getting your squat set up in a meet, you should be able to walk out your max without any problem.