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Heavier Weight/Fewer Reps or Lighter Weight/More Reps?

Which is more effective for gaining size: lifting more weight and doing fewer reps, or lifting lighter weights and doing more reps?

Do squats and deadlifts.

[quote]Bwick wrote:
Which is more effective for gaining size: lifting more weight and doing fewer reps, or lifting lighter weights and doing more reps?[/quote]

Both + above maintenance of calories

[quote]Bwick wrote:
Which is more effective for gaining size: lifting more weight and doing fewer reps, or lifting lighter weights and doing more reps?[/quote]

Both

In general less reps heavier weight is for strength and high reps light weight is for endurance so somewhere in the middle is said to be best for size. If you are not strong enough to lift something relatively heavy for 8-12 reps (“bodybuilding rep range”) you wont maker much progress.

I find it best to use various rep ranges, working on size as well as strength.

Here is the general Kinesiology version

1-3: power

3-8: strength

8-12: hypertrophy

12-15+ endurance

I believe thats what I was taught way back when.

It doesn’t necessarily matter as long as the proper stress is added to the muscle imo.

A bigger weight will stimulate the body to grow because it needs more muscle to lift the heavier weight.

More reps can sometimes cause more hypertrophy or damage to a muscle causing it to repair bigger if the weight was heavy enough to stimulate growth.

I generally stay in a 6-12 rep range. I may do 4x6 and really heavy for a few exercises and end with a 2 or 3x12-15 finishing exercise.

When going heavy I’m more concerned about building strength and then when I decide to jump in that 12 rep range for ‘hypertrophy’ I’m hoping its with a heavier weight than last time.

Really tho there is no freaking science to it.

If you bust your ass and move heaving stinking weight and stuff your face with the right food you will build muscle.

that easy.

DG

both
Use a pyramid. Start with high reps and pyramid down. I like to do something like:
14, 12, 10, 8, 8, and then 2-3 sets to failure trying to hit 8 reps

I sometimes work up to a 2-3 and then 1 rep max trying to beat my old record just because I like lifting heavy shit… I don’t even know if it’s helping me, but that’s just me.

Time under tension is important. If you lift a heavy ass weight 2 times at a slow pace because you’re really struggling and then cheat up the 3rd rep a bit and do a really slow negative, then that’s going to be pretty good for hypertrophy.

i dont see any point in going higher than 8 other than legs. unless youre shooting for a pump.

slow negatives also rock. especially after you just squeezed everything into getting that last rep UP now you have to fight to slow it, killer.

strength= lift heavy weights
hypertrophy= lift heavy weights lots of times=volume
both for a given amount of time.add food as required.

[quote]LiveFromThe781 wrote:
i dont see any point in going higher than 8 other than legs. unless youre shooting for a pump.

slow negatives also rock. especially after you just squeezed everything into getting that last rep UP now you have to fight to slow it, killer.[/quote]

I agree for the most part, but sometimes you can induce more growth by adding more volume and venturing up into the 12 rep range or so.

I know most bodybuilders are chemically enhanced, but look at most pro’s. The do go heavy (Ronnie) but they also will hit that hypertrophy range and add in more volume.

For purely bodybuilding purposes I don’t see a good reason to venture below 6 reps much unless strength is the goal and to venture above 8 or so maybe 12 being the highest.

Legs are a completely different story agreed. lol

Now that’s not even 1/4 the battle…because eating is still a factor. lol

As far as training I like that ‘rule of 24’ 4x6, 3x8, 2x12, etc. Those are the 3 schemes I commonly use.

DG

It doesn’t matter if its 1-5 reps or 5-10 reps, as long as the weight you are lifting is heavIER than LAST TIME, and you are gaining bodyweight.

Beyond that its a personal choice. Most people stick to the 6-10 rep range because they can still make progress without risking injury as much, and it allows a more focused mind-muscle-connection.

[quote]mr popular wrote:
It doesn’t matter if its 1-5 reps or 5-10 reps, as long as the weight you are lifting is heavIER than LAST TIME, and you are gaining bodyweight.

Beyond that its a personal choice. Most people stick to the 6-10 rep range because they can still make progress without risking injury as much, and it allows a more focused mind-muscle-connection.[/quote]

Agreed, but to a point the amount of reps performed does play a role in bodybuilding .vs. strength.

Many bodybuilders are a LOT bigger than powerlifters…but powerlifters are a LOT stronger than bodybuilders. With a few exceptions.

Same drugs, different training styles and nutritional habits. Both consume major cals…so this leads me to believe the way you train can and will dictate your progress in the gym.

If you continue to get bigger and stronger then yes…you are doing something right. lol

Everybody is also different. I found my legs didn’t want to grow until I started using more volume and less weight…where my back was the exact opposite.

Find what works for you and stick with it until progress slows then make a change and see whats up.

DG

heavy lifting with good form = size and strength. Period.