T Nation

Have I Done this Right?


#1

So I sat down the other day and decided to work out my nutritional requirements. I used Thibs "nutrition for newbies" to get these figurse and they just look REALLY whacked out...

I weight 244lbs so at 1.5g protien per pound of body weight thats 366g protien a day. Now this might not sound alot to you guys but when you consider that my daily calorie allowance is 3035 thats HALF my calories gone. Then I used the 50/50 fat/carbs ratio. 87g fat and 196g carbs.

What loses me is that I was lead to understand that your body will switch over to using the most abundant macronutriant for it's primary fuel source, which in this case is PROTIEN! :frowning: That can't be good. So do I switch to using the 90/10 ratio of fat/carbs OR do I take my LEAN body mass (188lbs) and use that to get my protien intake? Or both?

Have I just done something wrong? any ideas guys?

Yoda


#2

I always thought it was 1.5g per Pound of Lean Muscle Mass.


#3

Keep in mind:

  1. Not all of the protein you ingest will be used to repair and build muscle tissue.
  2. Protein can be turned into glucose via gluconeogenesis.
  3. This glucose then can either be store as glycogen or stored as fat.
  4. Breaking down muscle tissue for the amino acids and then using those as fuel is a very time consuming and energy consuming process. Unless you're in starvation mode under a very hypocalorie diet I don't see this happening to a large extent.

I see macro nutrient intake in sort of a continuum:

Carbs High, Fat Low, Protein Moderate
Carbs Low, Fat High, Protein High

If Carbs and Fat are High then excess carbs are easily stored as fat. If Carbs are Low then excess Protein easily converted into glucose. So, if Carbs Low and Protein Low then this negatively impacts muscle building.


#4

so at a lean body mass of 188Lbs then my protien intake is 282. That sounds better. :slight_smile:

I might switch to the carbs/fat ratio to 10%/90% of my remaining calories. See what happens...

Thanks guys.


#5

excess of any macronutrient can be stored as fat but its most difficult for the body to digest and turn protein into fat.

i dont think you're body just starts to use the most abundant macronutrient for fuel just like that. i think, in this case, you're body will only truely switch over to using protein as its primary source of fuel if not enough fat and carbs are ingested - which are the prefered sources of fuel over protein.

circuits are great for raising hgh levels which help mobilize fatty acids but if your not lifting heavy and keeping/increasing your strength you could lose some muscle in the process.

this is my opinion, hope it was helpful.